Environmental factors – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 17:31:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental factors – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Biological tipping point: At some point in life, environmental factors and age are more important than DNA for disease risk https://eco-label-tourism.com/biological-tipping-point-at-some-point-in-life-environmental-factors-and-age-are-more-important-than-dna-for-disease-risk/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/biological-tipping-point-at-some-point-in-life-environmental-factors-and-age-are-more-important-than-dna-for-disease-risk/ In 1952 Nobel laureate Dr. Peter Medawar have hypothesized that aging processes may be the result of the fact that natural evolutionary selection has little to say about people past their childbearing years. New study finds new support for The Medawar hypothesis in an analysis of how approximately 20,000 human genes are ExpressSource of trust […]]]>

In 1952 Nobel laureate Dr. Peter Medawar have hypothesized that aging processes may be the result of the fact that natural evolutionary selection has little to say about people past their childbearing years.

New study finds new support for The Medawar hypothesis in an analysis of how approximately 20,000 human genes are ExpressSource of trust as we age.

The study suggests that our genes have less influence as we age.

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Principal author of the study Dr. Peter Sudmantassistant professor in integrative biology at the University of California at Berkeley tells Berkeley News“Almost all common human diseases are diseases of aging: Alzheimer’s, cancers, heart disease, diabetes.”

“Massive amounts of public resources have been devoted to identifying the genetic variants that predispose you to these diseases. What our study shows is that in fact, as you age, genes have less importance for the expression of your genes,” says Sudmant.

“Genes that are activated when we are young are more evolutionarily limited because they are essential for our survival and reproduction, while genes expressed after reaching reproductive age are under less evolutionary pressure.”

This is an excerpt. Read the full article here

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Environmental factors can affect credit quality https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-can-affect-credit-quality/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 11:15:37 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-can-affect-credit-quality/ Cumberland Advisors is located in the city of Sarasota. In preparation for Hurricane Ian, which was initially expected to make landfall in the Tampa area, we dispatched employees to our disaster recovery site in Vineland, NJ, where Cumberland’s corporate headquarters was originally located. Our remote operations have been robust since our shift to fully remote […]]]>

Cumberland Advisors is located in the city of Sarasota. In preparation for Hurricane Ian, which was initially expected to make landfall in the Tampa area, we dispatched employees to our disaster recovery site in Vineland, NJ, where Cumberland’s corporate headquarters was originally located.

Our remote operations have been robust since our shift to fully remote working with the start of the COVID shutdowns. Fortunately, all of our staff are cared for and safe. Our thoughts and prayers are with those affected by Ian’s shock and who lost property and possibly their lives.

The massive, deadly surge of water and catastrophic winds that first hit land just west of Fort Myers are poised to make Ian one of the costliest storms in the history of the United States.

• Damage – $67 billion was a first estimate. Katrina was worth over $100 billion.

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In Iowa, focus on nutrition, environmental factors https://eco-label-tourism.com/in-iowa-focus-on-nutrition-environmental-factors/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 13:45:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/in-iowa-focus-on-nutrition-environmental-factors/ This photo shows a close-up of a beam scale in New York. Patrick Sison, AP FILE PHOTO DES MOINES — When working with obese children, nutrition is the first place to start, according to Stacey Milani, a pediatrician at a MercyOne pediatric clinic in Pleasant Hill. Milani is working on her certification as a physician […]]]>





This photo shows a close-up of a beam scale in New York.


Patrick Sison, AP FILE PHOTO


DES MOINES — When working with obese children, nutrition is the first place to start, according to Stacey Milani, a pediatrician at a MercyOne pediatric clinic in Pleasant Hill.

Milani is working on her certification as a physician in obesity medicine. She has experience working with patients struggling with health issues related to obesity. For the youngest, getting parents on board to work on health behaviors is sometimes difficult.







Milani Stacey

Stacey Milani


“It’s always a bit of an issue whether or not the parent is even going to accept that there’s a problem,” she said.

“Obviously with children it’s the parent who decides something needs to be done and makes the changes.”

Working with parents to manage a child’s nutrition can be challenging because pediatricians see patients in a short timeframe that doesn’t allow for detailed discussions. Insurance companies often don’t pay for consultations with nutritionists, Milani said.

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Childhood obesity can lead to a host of health problems, including high blood pressure, early heart problems and type 2 diabetes, she said.

As of 2019, Iowa’s childhood obesity rate is slightly higher than the national average. Among high school students, the state’s obesity rate is 17%, compared to a national rate of 15.5%, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Among children ages 10 to 17, 16.9 percent are obese, according to the State of Childhood Obesity. Iowa ranks 18th out of 50 states for this age group.

The rate in Iowa as measured by the CDC has increased over the past decade. The obesity rate was 13.2% in 2011 and 15.3% in 2017.

State initiatives

Iowa has several nutrition, fitness, and food insecurity initiatives aimed at reducing childhood obesity.

One of the most important is 5-2-1-0: Healthy Choices Matter. The program, which originated in Maine, came to Iowa in 2016 as the Central Iowa Healthy Kids Coalition sought to create simple messages. Today, the program is promoted by the Iowa Department of Public Health, the Healthiest State Initiative, and dozens of nonprofits and schools statewide.

The campaign encourages children to follow four simple guidelines: Eat five servings of fruit or vegetables a day; do not use screens for more than two hours a day; engage in physical activity for one hour a day; and consume sugar-free drinks.

It’s based on proven ways to improve health and reduce obesity, said Healthiest State Executive Director Jami Haberl. The Healthiest State Initiative is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to make Iowa the healthiest state in the nation.

“5-2-1-0 is evidence-based,” she said. “We know that people in Iowa don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, and that goes for kids and adults alike.”

The program has sites in schools, workplaces and daycares in 83 counties in Iowa. Over the past three years, the state has awarded grants to 16 communities for the prevention of childhood obesity to create “sustainable and equitable environmental and policy change that supports active living and healthy eating,” according to one. 2021 report.

Five more cities in Iowa will begin receiving funding in 2022.

“Work Together, Iowa [Department of Health and Human Services] and the Healthiest State Initiative are providing strategic leadership, stakeholder engagement, community funding, and evaluation of the initiative,” said Iowa HHS spokeswoman Sarah Ekstrand.

When it comes to making healthy choices, how Iowa compares to the rest of the nation depends on the metrics.

In 2019, according to the CDC’s High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Iowa students scored lower than their national peers on most nutritional parameters. They were more likely to have eaten no fruit or vegetables in the past seven days and to have drunk soda or several servings of soda per day.

On measures of physical activity, Iowa students generally performed better than national averages. They were more likely to have participated in physical activity for at least 60 minutes on one or more days in the previous week. They were also less likely to have played video games or used a computer for three or more hours a day, and less likely to have skipped physical education class for one or more days.

Federal aid

Like other states, Iowa participates in federal programs that provide nutritional assistance to low-income families and children.

Iowa’s obesity rate for children ages 2 to 4 participating in WIC, a federal nutrition assistance program for women, infants, and children, was 15.8% in 2020, according to the CDC.

In 2019, 58,064 Iowa residents were enrolled in WIC, according to a State of Childhood Obesity report. The report found that 46.8% of aid-eligible residents participated in 2016.

The state also administers the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance program, with 144,000 children participating in 2018, or 43.4% of those eligible.

The Healthiest State initiative also offers a “Double Up Food Bucks” program that allows SNAP recipients to increase the purchasing power of their fresh produce aid at participating stores. SNAP recipients can get up to $10 more per day to spend on products.

“They can go to a participating location, whether it’s a farmers’ market or a grocery store…and they can use their SNAP EBT card to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, and for every fresh fruit and vegetable they buy, they can receive a dollar from Double the Food Dollars,” Haberl said.

Social, environmental factors

Looking at the causes of childhood obesity, Jessica Nelson, United Way’s Health Community Impact Coordinator, said it helps to understand the social determinants of children’s health, including environmental factors.

Nelson said obesity rates aren’t just about eating healthy foods and being active. The prevalence of childhood obesity also depends on the environment in which children live. The prevalence of sidewalks, green spaces, and the availability of food in a neighborhood are all correlated with health and obesity. Such things can be changed by policy changes, not necessarily by individual actions.

“How do we make sure people understand the importance of this, that it’s not just about making these healthy choices and choosing an apple over crisps, but really, do they have the option apple in their community?” she says. “Do they have walkable and safe communities where they can be active?

Nelson said the 5-2-1-0 campaign moved to view childhood obesity through this lens, seeking to influence systems for better health. Grants awarded under the program in recent years have gone towards setting up water filling stations in schools and parks and setting up “story walks” to encourage the ‘physical activity.

“It really started with looking at those messages that impact individual behavior, but it’s moved to more looking at environments and systems that can help create healthy communities,” Nelson said. .

These problems also arise in clinical settings. Milani, the Pleasant Hill pediatrician, often asks parents to worry about their child getting enough exercise because they don’t have a garden or there isn’t a convenient way to exercise. activity outside the home. Some families live in food deserts and do not have easy access to fresh produce.

Milani said her office asks about food insecurity on intake forms, asking if a family needs help getting food or other essentials.

“We have health workers who will examine them and then try to help people who are struggling and who might need extra food or might need help with certain social situations,” she said.

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How environmental factors might influence disease and medication https://eco-label-tourism.com/how-environmental-factors-might-influence-disease-and-medication/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 13:16:36 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/how-environmental-factors-might-influence-disease-and-medication/ Image Credit: Shutterstock/Amanita Silvicora The study of lifetime exposures, also known as the ‘exposome’, offers new insight into how environmental and social factors affect disease pathways and overall well-being, and may influence how whose pharma researches drugs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines the exposome as “the measure of all of an […]]]>

The study of lifetime exposures, also known as the ‘exposome’, offers new insight into how environmental and social factors affect disease pathways and overall well-being, and may influence how whose pharma researches drugs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines the exposome as “the measure of all of an individual’s exposures over a lifetime and how those exposures relate to health.” Amid the global spotlight on climate change, exposome research has exploded in recent years, becoming more relevant than ever.

In 2020, the EU launched the European Human Exposomes Network (EHEN) to tackle environmental and health issues. EHEN has nine large-scale projects that are executed by 126 research groups in 24 countries. The initiative has received 106 million euros ($105.5 million) from the European Commission to achieve the goal of understanding the impact of environmental and social exposures on health.

A better understanding of the exposome could in particular help research on atopic diseases and allergies. The ultimate goal of exposome research is to identify genetic and environmental risk factors, how they combine to form the overall risk of a disease, its prognosis, and a patient’s needs and susceptibility to different treatments, says Dr. Marc Rothenberg, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. As it happens, “[We] can intervene with different drugs and influence the natural history of the disease.

This week, scientists from 34e The annual conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2022) will explore the wide range of exposome research and its possible applications in the health sciences. Dr Sylvain Sebert, coordinator of the Longitools project, one of the EHEN projects, describes its goal as “using exposomal research to understand the relationship between environmental factors, including pollution and other toxic factors, and the risk of diseases cardiovascular and cardiometabolic across the course of life.”

Map the exposome

In 2005, cancer epidemiologist Dr. Christopher Wild first coined the term exposome, which has since become a burgeoning area of ​​research. Like the Human Genome Project, exposomal research aims to map all exposures that affect the human body throughout life in order to improve health outcomes. Exposome research also aims to understand the effects of environmental exposures to mitigate the effects of climate change on human health. A wide range of tools ranging from bioinformatics programs to systems biology approaches are used to map the full extent of the exposome.

Dr. Robert Barouki, biochemist and molecular biologist, heads Inserm Unit 1124, a research unit that studies environmental toxicity, therapeutic targets, cell signaling and biomarkers. Barouki’s research involves using an AI-based tool to find chemical exposures associated with diabetes and linking them to meaningful events and adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). “This is done primarily through text mining the [adverse outcome] path. The tool develops a framework that links a molecular event to cellular events and adverse outcomes to identify meaningful associations.

Another of Barouki’s studies looked at persistent chemicals associated with metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, fat cells taken from the tumors of more than 100 women were analyzed and, after chemical analysis, the researchers were able to determine that the chemical dioxin, a by-product of many manufacturing processes, had a correlation with a increase in tumor size. Further away in vitro study concluded that dioxin increased the incidence of breast cancer tumor metastasis, by inducing the expression of a cancer stem cell marker.

The EHEN REMEDIA project focuses on how exposures affect cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). REMEDIA project coordinator Sophie Lanone, PhD, explains that common environmental risk factors (eg, smoking) can have varying effects on CF and COPD phenotypes. To understand this variability, REMEDIA conducts epidemiological and experimental studies. On the epidemiological level, “we are studying the effect of these factors on the development of COPD in five cohorts of patients, and we have access to the French registry of cystic fibrosis”, explains Lanone, who is also part of the GEIC20, a team interdisciplinary of Mondor Biomedical. Research Institute, Créteil, France. On the experimental side, researchers expose mice to different factors such as air pollution, stress and physical activity.

A better understanding of disease pathways opens the door to the development of new drugs and treatment algorithms. By understanding the exposome, Barouki says, “you better understand how a chemical works, what proteins are involved, and what negative pathways are activated…which means you can maybe look at that pathway to develop a drug.”

In the field of atopic diseases and allergies, researchers have focused on integrating new exposomic knowledge into precision medicine approaches. “Atopic disease is a complex trait, which means there are genes and environmental factors that interact to cause different responses in some individuals,” Rothenberg said. “The ultimate goal is to identify genetic and environmental risk factors, and how they combine to form an overall disease risk, which can influence prognosis, as well as a patient’s susceptibility and need for different treatments” , he adds.

Rothenberg predicts that understanding “omics” such as the exposome could become critical for the future of precision medicine. Phenotype penetration is going to be paramount not only for precision medicine in terms of targeting specific pathways, but also for personalized responses to drugs and variability, he says.

Climate change and health inequalities

In addition to drug development, exposomal research may have broader implications for human health. One such area involving environmental factors is that of climate change and air pollution. PM2.5 refers to particles with a size of 2.5 microns and is linked to the pathology of asthma, COPD, coronary heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, etc. These particles are small enough to pass through the lungs into the bloodstream and organs and tend to be emitted during activities such as home heating and power generation. The government has made significant efforts to reduce the amount of PM2.5 particles in the air.

Dr. Tesafye Mersha, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati, says it’s difficult to map these particles and other aspects of the exposome. “The problem is that the technology for mapping the exposome is not that mature, and the measurement is very limited in some ways.” However, he argues that it was important to overcome this issue when mapping environmental exposures, saying, “We need to factor this into our disease control prevention strategies, including precision medicine.”

Further, Sebert describes the importance of this data, saying, “It is important to examine how environmental inequality relates to health inequality.” Longitools conducts epidemiological studies and aims to develop new methods for monitoring and forecasting and to help plan new European health and environmental policies, among others, Sebert explains.

Processing large amounts of data

Despite the potential importance, the scale of exposomal data slows the process of their large-scale use in the development of new drugs and the implementation of new policies.

Of the wide range of chemical exposures present, scientists only have a small understanding of 10,000 or 20,000 chemical exposures, Barouki says. “[The] the great challenge of the exposome is that it is too broad and that we cannot know everything, but we should not expect to dose and map everything; we should try to do everything we can,” he said.

Despite the daunting task ahead of mapping the exposome, the researchers are optimistic about the possible impact this knowledge could have. Referring to the exposome, Sebert adds, “I’m very optimistic that it provides a better opportunity to improve and understand health more empirically. Knowledge is improving, so there is no reason why treatment should not improve as well.

Related companies

]]> How environmental factors might influence disease and medication https://eco-label-tourism.com/how-environmental-factors-might-influence-disease-and-medication-2/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/how-environmental-factors-might-influence-disease-and-medication-2/ Image Credit: Shutterstock/Amanita Silvicora The study of lifetime exposures, also known as the ‘exposome’, offers new insight into how environmental and social factors affect disease pathways and overall well-being, and may influence how whose pharma researches drugs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define the exposome as “the measure of all of an […]]]>

The study of lifetime exposures, also known as the ‘exposome’, offers new insight into how environmental and social factors affect disease pathways and overall well-being, and may influence how whose pharma researches drugs.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) define the exposome as “the measure of all of an individual’s exposures over a lifetime and how those exposures relate to health”. In the middle of a global spotlight on climate changeexposome research has exploded in recent years, becoming more relevant than ever.

In 2020, the EU launched the European Human Exposomes Network (EHEN) to tackle environmental and health issues. EHEN has nine large-scale projects that are executed by 126 research groups in 24 countries. The initiative has received 106 million euros ($105.5 million) from the European Commission to achieve the goal of understanding the impact of environmental and social exposures on health.

A better understanding of the exposome could in particular help research on atopic diseases and allergies. The ultimate goal of exposome research is to identify genetic and environmental risk factors, how they combine to form the overall risk of a disease, its prognosis, and a patient’s needs and susceptibility to different treatments, says Dr. Marc Rothenberg, of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. As it happens, “[We] can intervene with different drugs and influence the natural history of the disease.

This week, scientists from 34e The annual conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE 2022) will explore the wide range of exposome research and its possible applications in the health sciences. Dr Sylvain Sebert, coordinator of the Longitools project, one of the EHEN projects, describes its goal as “using exposomal research to understand the relationship between environmental factors, including pollution and other toxic factors, and the risk of diseases cardiovascular and cardiometabolic across the course of life.”

Map the exposome

In 2005, cancer epidemiologist Dr. Christopher Wild first coined the term exposome, which has since become a burgeoning area of ​​research. Like the Human Genome Project, exposomal research aims to map all exposures that affect the human body throughout life in order to improve health outcomes. Exposome research also aims to understand the effects of environmental exposures to mitigate the effects of climate change on human health. A wide range of tools ranging from bioinformatics programs to systems biology approaches are used to map the full extent of the exposome.

Dr. Robert Barouki, biochemist and molecular biologist, heads Inserm Unit 1124, a research unit that studies environmental toxicity, therapeutic targets, cell signaling and biomarkers. Barouki’s research involves using an AI-based tool to find chemical exposures associated with diabetes and linking them to meaningful events and adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). “This is done primarily through text mining the [adverse outcome] path. The tool develops a framework that links a molecular event to cellular events and adverse outcomes to identify meaningful associations.

Another of Barouki’s studies looked at persistent chemicals associated with metastasis in breast cancer. In this study, fat cells taken from the tumors of more than 100 women were analyzed and, after chemical analysis, the researchers were able to determine that the chemical dioxin, a by-product of many manufacturing processes, had a correlation with a increase in tumor size. Further away in vitro study concluded that dioxin increased the incidence of breast cancer tumor metastasis, by inducing the expression of a cancer stem cell marker.

The EHEN project Remedy focuses on how exposures affect cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). RemedyProject coordinator Sophie Lanone, PhD, explains that common environmental risk factors (eg, smoking) can have varying effects on CF and COPD phenotypes. To understand this variability, Remedy conducts epidemiological and experimental studies. On the epidemiological level, “we are studying the effect of these factors on the development of COPD in five cohorts of patients, and we have access to the French registry of cystic fibrosis”, explains Lanone, who is also part of the GEIC20, a team interdisciplinary of Mondor Biomedical. Research Institute, Créteil, France. On the experimental side, researchers expose mice to different factors such as air pollution, stress and physical activity.

A better understanding of disease pathways opens the door to the development of new drugs and treatment algorithms. By understanding the exposome, Barouki says, “you better understand how a chemical works, what proteins are involved, and what negative pathways are activated…which means you can maybe look at that pathway to develop a drug.”

In the field of atopic diseases and allergies, researchers have focused on integrating new exposomic knowledge into precision medicine approaches. “Atopic disease is a complex trait, which means there are genes and environmental factors that interact to cause different responses in some individuals,” Rothenberg said. “The ultimate goal is to identify genetic and environmental risk factors, and how they combine to form an overall disease risk, which can influence prognosis, as well as a patient’s susceptibility and need for different treatments” , he adds.

Rothenberg predicts that understanding “omics” such as the exposome could become critical for the future of precision medicine. Phenotype penetration is going to be paramount not only for precision medicine in terms of targeting specific pathways, but also for personalized responses to drugs and variability, he says.

Climate change and health inequalities

In addition to drug development, exposomal research may have broader implications for human health. One such area involving environmental factors is that of climate change and air pollution. PM2.5 refers to particles with a size of 2.5 microns and is linked to the pathology of asthma, COPD, coronary heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, etc. These particles are small enough to pass through the lungs into the bloodstream and organs and tend to be emitted during activities such as home heating and power generation. The government has made significant efforts to reduce the amount of PM2.5 particles in the air.

Dr. Tesfaye Mersha, a professor of pediatrics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, says it’s difficult to map these particles and other aspects of the exposome. “The problem is that the technology for mapping the exposome is not that mature, and the measurement is very limited in some ways.” However, he argues that it was important to overcome this issue when mapping environmental exposures, saying, “We need to factor this into our disease control prevention strategies, including precision medicine.”

Further, Sebert describes the importance of this data, saying, “It is important to examine how environmental inequality relates to health inequality.” Longitools conducts epidemiological studies and aims to develop new methods for monitoring and forecasting and to help plan new European health and environmental policies, among others, Sebert explains.

Processing large amounts of data

Despite the potential importance, the scale of exposomal data slows the process of their large-scale use in the development of new drugs and the implementation of new policies.

Of the wide range of chemical exposures present, scientists only have a small understanding of 10,000 or 20,000 chemical exposures, Barouki says. “[The] the great challenge of the exposome is that it is too broad and that we cannot know everything, but we should not expect to dose and map everything; we should try to do everything we can,” he said.

Despite the daunting task ahead of mapping the exposome, the researchers are optimistic about the possible impact this knowledge could have. Referring to the exposome, Sebert adds, “I’m very optimistic that it provides a better opportunity to improve and understand health more empirically. Knowledge is improving, so there is no reason why treatment should not improve as well.

Related companies



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Association Between Ownership of Patient Care and Personal or Environmental Factors in Medical Trainees: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study | BMC medical training https://eco-label-tourism.com/association-between-ownership-of-patient-care-and-personal-or-environmental-factors-in-medical-trainees-a-multicenter-cross-sectional-study-bmc-medical-training/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:45:54 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/association-between-ownership-of-patient-care-and-personal-or-environmental-factors-in-medical-trainees-a-multicenter-cross-sectional-study-bmc-medical-training/ The context In Japan, those wishing to practice clinical medicine enter a compulsory clinical graduate program after obtaining a national license for physicians. All trainees alternate between several clinical departments (junior residents; kenshui in Japanese) for two years. It is only after the two years of training that doctors proceed to higher postgraduate clinical training […]]]>

The context

In Japan, those wishing to practice clinical medicine enter a compulsory clinical graduate program after obtaining a national license for physicians. All trainees alternate between several clinical departments (junior residents; kenshui in Japanese) for two years. It is only after the two years of training that doctors proceed to higher postgraduate clinical training in specialized areas, which usually lasts more than three years (senior residents; senkoui in Japanese) [16].

study design

In this study, we used a cross-sectional multicenter design. Approval to conduct this study was granted by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Tokyo (IRB approval number: 2021108NI).

Framework and participants

Thirty graduate clinical training hospitals in Japan were selected using information from the Electronic Residency Information System, which is a database of teaching hospitals developed and maintained by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. Twenty-five of the thirty hospitals agreed to collaborate in our research. Participating hospitals were geographically distributed throughout Japan. These hospitals varied in size and included both teaching and community hospitals (Table 1).

Table 1 Characteristics of the 25 participating hospitals

Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to all eligible participants [n = 1038] by their training program administrators in September 2021. Eligible study participants were all first- through sixth-year postgraduate (PGY) trainees in the training programs of the 25 hospitals that had committed to participate in the study. The participants filled out the questionnaires, put them in their respective envelopes and handed them over to those in charge of the training program. The administrators mailed them to the researchers. Participants were informed that participation was voluntary. About a week after the survey was distributed, they received a reminder. A second reminder was sent a week later.

Outcome Variable: Patient Ownership Scale

Ownership of patient care was measured using J-PCOS [15]. J-PCOS is a 13-item instrument. Participants were asked to assume hospital care settings when completing the survey. Each item was scored on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from 1 = strongly disagree to 7 = strongly agree. Total J-PCOS scores were calculated by summing the item scores for each participant. Therefore, the total J-PCOS ranges from 13 to 91, with higher values ​​indicating better PCO.

Environmental factors

Based on a literature review [7, 11,12,13,14, 17]various environmental factors that may be associated with PCO were included as explanatory variables: hospital size (≤ 500 beds; 501–800 beds; 801–1000 beds; or ≥ 1001 beds), type of hospital (community hospital vs university hospital), medical care system (single shujii system vs multiple shujii (as described below in detail)), number of team members (≤ 2; 3-4; 5-6; or ≥ 7), number of inpatients in charge (≤ 3; 4-6; 7 -9; or ≥ 10), average number of hours worked per week, number of off-peak calls per month (0 vs ≥ 1), and perceived level of the workplace as a learning environment.

With regard to the question of the medical care system, participants were asked to choose between two of the following options: a single shujii (the physician primarily responsible for the patient) system and several shujii system (team system). In Japan, most hospitals used a single shujii system. In one shujii system, a single doctor takes charge of a patient’s care until discharge. In this system, even if other doctors are on call during their off hours, hospital doctors cannot just take a break because they have to constantly check on patients’ condition and treat them accordingly. [18]. When a resident becomes a shujii for a given patient, the legal responsibility for patient care is considered to rest with the supervisor, but the majority of management (eg, scheduling exams, planning treatment, and explaining the condition to the patient) is left to the resident. However, in recent years, overwork of doctors has become a problem in Japan. [19, 20]and some hospitals have started adopting multiple shujii system as a counter-response. In many shujii system, multiple physicians are responsible for patient care as a team. As either of these two systems is likely to affect the development of trainees’ OCP, we decided to include it as an explanatory variable in this study.

We asked participants about the average working hours on weekends and weekdays and the number of night shifts per month they work. Based on previous studies [21,22,23]we calculated the average number of working hours per week using the following formula:

Average working hours per week = 5 * (Average working hours on weekdays) + 2 * (Average working hours on weekends) + 7 * (Number of night tasks per month/30) * (24–hours of average weekday work).

Previous research (both qualitative and quantitative) has shown that the learning environment can impact PCO training [12, 14]. In particular, the article validating the PCO scale showed that residents trained in a positive learning environment had a significantly higher PCO through bivariate analysis using the Mini-Rez scale of Linzer et al. [14]. Accordingly, we decided to include workplace level as a learning environment as an explanatory variable. We chose a single-item global rating scale for the following three reasons. First, in the field of medical education and work environment research, the usefulness of global rating scales has been proposed because of their excellence in capturing nuanced elements. [24,25,26]. The learning environment is a multi-faceted concept, and its nuances can best be captured by a comprehensive rating scale. In fact, a one-item measure of the learning environment has been used in previous studies in the field of medical education. [27,28,29], which would justify our use of an overall score in this study. Second, in terms of response rate, shorter questionnaires generally give better results. [30]. Since the survey covered many explanatory variables, there was concern that the response rate would decrease if a large number of questions were required for each explanatory variable. Third, to our knowledge, there is no valid Japanese version of the Mini-Rez scale. Therefore, we used a single measure of workplace level as the learning environment as follows: “Using any number from 0 to 10, where 0 is the worst possible learning environment and 10 is the best possible learning environment, what number should you use to rate your current department as a learning environment? »

Personal factors

We also included some personal factors as possible explanatory variables related to PCO based on previous studies. [7, 11,12,13,14, 17]; they are: educational level (PGY 1–2 (junior residents); kenshui) vs. PGY 3–6 (senior residents; senkoui)); the gender of the participants (female, male or other identities); and participant service (internal medicine, surgery or other services).

In Japan, internal medicine and surgery and other departments treat a large number of hospitalized patients. We considered that the differences by department could affect the PCO and decided to add the departments of the participants to the explanatory variables.

statistical analyzes

In this study, a linear mixed-effects model was used (random intercept model), which includes random effects for hospitals and explanatory variables (i.e. gender, education level, department, hospital size, type of hospital, medical care system, number of member teams, number of inpatients in charge, average weekly working hours, post-work on-call obligations and level of workplace as learning environment) as fixed effects. The full case analysis approach was chosen due to the small amount of missing data. One to two tails p a value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. We used SPSS Statistics 27.0 (IBM Japan; Tokyo, Japan) to analyze our data.

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ENVIRONMENTAL project: deciphering the environmental factors linked to mental disorders https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-project-deciphering-the-environmental-factors-linked-to-mental-disorders/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 11:50:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-project-deciphering-the-environmental-factors-linked-to-mental-disorders/ The environMENTAL project will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions. Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro). The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what […]]]>

The environMENTAL project will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions.

Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro).

Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro).

The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new insights and potentially positive outcomes for participants.

The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new insights and potentially positive outcomes for participants.

Determining the influence of global environmental challenges in the field of brain and mental health is the main objective of the environMENTAL project. This initiative is funded by the European Union under the Horizon Europe program, which will deploy an international consortium with the participation of the University of Barcelona, ​​and will be led by Professor Gunter Schumann, Head of the Center for Population Neuroscience and precision. Medicine (PONS) and Fudan University (Shanghai).

The project, which will end in May 2027, will study the impacts of climate, pollution, urbanity, regional socio-economic conditions and the COVID-19 pandemic on brain health, and decipher their biological mechanisms. underlyings. The research team will analyze data from more than one million European citizens and patients to uncover brain mechanisms related to environmental factors that lead to symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress and substance abuse.

As Professor Gunter Schumann points out, “a better understanding of environmental factors and their corresponding genetic modulation responsible for specific pathological mechanisms will help estimate individual risk levels and facilitate the treatment of environmentally related mental illnesses.”

Data acquired from remote sensing satellites, climate models, atmospheric measurements, public resources and digital health applications will be linked to citizen and patient data using complex intelligence-based computer models to demonstrate the effect of environmental events on brain structure and function. Comprehensive analyzes using omics techniques, 3D brain organoids and virtual brain simulations will complement the analyzes to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms.

Once the most relevant molecular pathways have been identified, the team will begin to screen pharmacological compounds to identify molecules that interact with pathogenic molecules, and thus improve drug discovery.

At the same time, pioneering digital health strategies using virtual reality to improve the response of people at risk of environment-related mental illnesses will also be put in place. Participants will be exposed to different psychosocial environmental scenarios (noise, crowded spaces, etc.) and trained to deal with these situations; they will also have access to a virtual therapist who will guide them to overcome anxieties and depression. “There is more than 30 years of evidence showing that people tend to react realistically to situations and events in immersive virtual reality,” says Professor Mel Slater, director of the Event Lab research group and faculty member of psychology and the neuroscience institute. (NeuroUB) of the UB.

“One of the most important areas of application has been mental health. As part of the environMENTAL project, we will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new insights and potentially positive outcomes for participants and, in ultimately, the patients. This objective will be linked to digital mental health assessments and, in this regard, a set of neuropsychological tests will be developed alongside a smartphone application to determine health problems in combination with environmental factors of daily life. This will be based on the principles of citizen science, which allow for greater participation and interaction within the community.

With this innovative and interdisciplinary approach, environMENTAL will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions, as well as patient associations and other sectors outside from academia.

The project also involves other internationally renowned teams from the University Hospital of Bonn, the Charité Hospital and the Free University of Berlin (Germany); the Austrian Institute of Science and Technology; the University of Southern California and the Georgia State University Research Foundation (USA); King’s College London and the University of Aix-Marseille (France), among others.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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ENVIRONMENTAL project: deciphering the environmental factors linked to mental disorders https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-project-deciphering-the-environmental-factors-linked-to-mental-disorders-2/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-project-deciphering-the-environmental-factors-linked-to-mental-disorders-2/ The environMENTAL project will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions. Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro). The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what […]]]>


The environMENTAL project will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions.


Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro).

Professor Mel Slater, of the UB School of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute (UBNeuro).


The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new insights and potentially positive outcomes for participants.

The environMENTAL project will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new insights and potentially positive outcomes for participants.

Determining the influence of global environmental challenges in the field of brain and mental health is the main objective of the ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT. This initiative is funded by the European Union under the Horizon Europe program, which will deploy an international consortium with the participation of the University of Barcelona, ​​and will be led by Professor Gunter Schumann, Head of the Center for Population Neuroscience and precision. Medicine (PONS) and Fudan University (Shanghai).

The project, which will end in May 2027, will study the impacts of climate, pollution, urbanity, regional socio-economic conditions and the COVID-19 pandemic on brain health, and decipher their biological mechanisms. underlyings. The research team will analyze data from more than one million European citizens and patients to uncover brain mechanisms related to environmental factors that lead to symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress and substance abuse.

As Professor Gunter Schumann points out, “a better understanding of environmental factors and their corresponding genetic modulation responsible for specific pathological mechanisms will help estimate individual risk levels and facilitate the treatment of environmentally related mental illnesses.”

Data acquired from remote sensing satellites, climate models, atmospheric measurements, public resources and digital health applications will be linked to citizen and patient data using complex intelligence-based computer models to demonstrate the effect of environmental events on brain structure and function. Comprehensive analyzes using omics techniques, 3D brain organoids and virtual brain simulations will complement the analyzes to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms.

Once the most relevant molecular pathways have been identified, the team will begin to screen pharmacological compounds to identify molecules that interact with pathogenic molecules, and thus improve drug discovery.

At the same time, pioneering digital health strategies using virtual reality to improve the response of people at risk of environment-related mental illnesses will also be put in place. Participants will be exposed to different psychosocial environmental scenarios (noise, crowded spaces, etc.) and trained to deal with these situations; they will also have access to a virtual therapist who will guide them to overcome anxieties and depression. “There is more than 30 years of evidence showing that people tend to react realistically to situations and events in immersive virtual reality,” says Professor Mel Slater, director of the Event Lab Research Group and member of the Faculty of Psychology and Institute of Neuroscience (NeuroUB) from the UB.

“One of the most important areas of application has been mental health. As part of the environMENTAL project, we will create scenarios that use the power of virtual reality to go beyond what is possible in reality and lead to new ideas and potentially positive outcomes for participants and, in ultimately, the patients. This objective will be linked to digital mental health assessments and, in this regard, a set of neuropsychological tests will be developed alongside a smartphone application to determine health problems in combination with environmental factors of daily life. This will be based on the principles of citizen science, which allow for greater participation and interaction within the community.

With this innovative and interdisciplinary approach, environMENTAL will bring together the ideas and expertise of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, geoscientists, climatologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, anthropologists, computer scientists and experts in digital interventions, as well as patient associations and other sectors outside from academia.

The project also involves other internationally renowned teams from the University Hospital of Bonn, the Charité Hospital and the Free University of Berlin (Germany); the Austrian Institute of Science and Technology; the University of Southern California and the Georgia State University Research Foundation (USA); King’s College London and the University of Aix-Marseille (France), among others.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

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Rokita: Environmental factors in public pension funds favor leftist agenda https://eco-label-tourism.com/rokita-environmental-factors-in-public-pension-funds-favor-leftist-agenda/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/rokita-environmental-factors-in-public-pension-funds-favor-leftist-agenda/ *This story has been updated to include a statement from the Indiana Bankers Association. The State of Indiana has been drafted by its top legal official to get involved in a nationwide effort to target financial institutions that have chosen, or are perceived to have chosen, to walk away from fuels investments. fossils or to […]]]>

*This story has been updated to include a statement from the Indiana Bankers Association.

The State of Indiana has been drafted by its top legal official to get involved in a nationwide effort to target financial institutions that have chosen, or are perceived to have chosen, to walk away from fuels investments. fossils or to participate in “left-wing social causes”.

Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita released a advisory opinion claiming that investments made by the Indiana Public Retirement System Board could not be made with strategies based on non-financial considerations known as environmental, social and governance, or ESG, considerations.

Rokita said existing federal and state laws prohibit trustees from making investment decisions with anything other than the financial best interests of beneficiaries in mind. He said ESG considerations violate these laws and “advance left-wing social causes” and “bad economic agendas” that could not be achieved through elections.

“This specific type of investment is disguised to appear as a good deed. Good for you, good for the planet, perhaps, but this moves away from having to put the financial interests of individual savers first, rather than the political goals of investment managers,” Rokita said in a press conference. “Woke” big business is collaborating with their leftist allies to overthrow the will of the people. This includes investing Hoosiers pensions in ways that work against the best interests of Indiana families.

Rokita’s opinion follows a failed attempt to pass a bill in the 2022 legislative session that would have prohibited the state from investing in or contracting with companies that “boycott” fossil fuels. The bill was withdrawn after the Indiana Bankers Association opposed the legislation, calling it “an anti-free market bill.”

IBA told the Indiana Environmental Reporter that it is still reviewing the advisory but generally opposes the investment restrictions.

“While we are still considering the impact of IN AG 2022-3, restricting investments or state trading based on ESG statements, or any other corporate statements, is fundamentally wrong. does nothing to alleviate the growing pressure financial institutions face from federal regulators regarding climate risk management.Restricting investments based on subjective ESG statements only harms Indiana financial institutions and those which draw on a diverse mix of investment options available to the IN public pension system,” said IBA Policy Director Dax Denton.

ESG criteria are used to screen investments avoid losses when companies engage in risky or unethical practices, such as supporting more and more unpopular and potentially unprofitable investments in fossil fuels.

The burning of fossil fuels resulted in greenhouse gas emissions that trapped heat in the atmosphere, causing dangerous and costly climate change.

Financial institutions, pension funds, city and state governments, faith-based organizations and other entities around the world are committed to retaining approximately $40.6 trillion investments from the fossil fuel industry.

The fossil fuel industry has retaliated against the divestments by using its influence on red state officials and politicians through various right-wing organizations it funds, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council, the Heritage Foundation and others, to enact legislative and administrative measures which would protect the industry.

ALEC provides “model legislation” to lawmakers who pursue right-wing goals like opposite federal action on climate change, amendment the American Constitution to make it more favorable to conservative ideas, delay closing coal-fired power plants, urging logging companies to clear forests to fight wildfires, to prevent States and regional efforts to regulate greenhouse and other gases.

States like Kentucky, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas have all passed laws based on ALEC’s model legislation that sever ties with financial institutions that divest from fossil fuels.

Rokita served as main speaker at the 2016 ALEC Annual Meeting in Indianapolis.

Rokita’s advisory opinion is based on a request from Indiana Senator Eric Koch, public chair of the ALEC Communications and Technology Working Group.

Some controversial environmental rollbacks in Indiana have ties to ALEC or its model legislation, such as the repeal of most state wetland protections Written by ALEC State President Senator Linda Rogers and a law 2021 which prohibited local governments from enacting laws eliminating or phasing out the use of natural gas and other fossil fuels or requiring energy-saving or energy-generating systems.

Representative Ethan Manning introduced a bill which reflected a ALEC Model Policy during this year’s legislative session. House Bill 1224 sought to end a “boycott” by companies that refused to invest in fossil fuels at all levels, including pledges to reduce their carbon footprint and other self-governance decisions.

The bill was withdrawn after the Indiana Bankers Association objected to the policy in public hearings and the Indiana Department of Administration warned that the legislation would further limit the already limited number of financial institutions that can provide financial services to the state, such as credit cards, fuel cards, administration of child support payments, unemployment benefits and other social programs.

The bill could resurface in the 2023 legislative session.

Rokita said he will join Republican attorneys general in Arizona and Missouri in investigating major investment management companies and programs such as BlackRock Inc., Vanguard Group Inc., State Street Corp., Morningstar Inc. and the United Nations Environment Program Net-Zero. Banking Alliance violated Indiana state law.

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Is multiple sclerosis hereditary? Genetic and environmental factors play a role https://eco-label-tourism.com/is-multiple-sclerosis-hereditary-genetic-and-environmental-factors-play-a-role/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 18:31:54 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/is-multiple-sclerosis-hereditary-genetic-and-environmental-factors-play-a-role/ Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease where, for reasons scientists are still trying to figure out, your body’s immune system suddenly attacks the lining covering the nerves in your brain and spinal cord. “If you think of nerve cells as wires, myelin is like the insulation protecting those wires,” explains Josef Gutman, MD, neurologist and […]]]>

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease where, for reasons scientists are still trying to figure out, your body’s immune system suddenly attacks the lining covering the nerves in your brain and spinal cord.

“If you think of nerve cells as wires, myelin is like the insulation protecting those wires,” explains Josef Gutman, MD, neurologist and director of the NYU Long Island Comprehensive Multiple Sclerosis Center. Inflammation and other immune damage to the outer lining of nerves can disrupt nerve cell firing, leading to a wide range of symptoms from muscle weakness to vision problems.

Scientists have not found a real cause behind multiple sclerosis. But what is known is that there is a genetic factor that could influence your risk of disease.

How do your genes affect multiple sclerosis?

There is no single gene that directly causes MS

There are many genes, as many as 233– that everyone has their own small contribution to multiple sclerosis. “There’s a lot of research going into alleles, bits of gene, in people with multiple sclerosis that aren’t seen in the general population that might make them susceptible to the disease,” he adds. Mary Ann Picone, MD., a multiple sclerosis neurologist at Holy Name Medical Center.

Dr. Gutman says those most relevant to the development of multiple sclerosis are those involved in the regulation of the immune system. In other words, genes that regulate what your immune system will or will not target. In effect, to research shows that some of these genes, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB1*15:01, are involved in innate immunity, the first line of defense when a threat is present in the organism, and contribute to the progression of multiple sclerosis.

Your genes play a small role in multiple sclerosis

Having a family history of multiple sclerosis can also increase your risk of contracting the disease, although it is not something that is passed down from parent to child. Also, even if a parent has multiple sclerosis, Dr. Gutman says the increased risk is very small in the grand scheme of things. “Compare it to sickle cell anemia where if one parent has sickle cell disease you have a 25% chance of being a carrier, sometimes 50% depending on the other parent.”

“That’s one of the ways we know multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease unlike Alzheimer’s disease, where it’s more of a neurodegenerative disease with a weaker genetic link,” adds Sharon Stoll, DO., a neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis and neuroimmunology at the Yale School of Medicine.

What is your genetic risk?

You have an estimate 1 in 67 chance (1.5%) of contracting multiple sclerosis if the mother or father also have it. A sibling with multiple sclerosis translates to a 1 in 37 (2.7%) chance of developing it yourself.

In identical twins whose genes are 100% identical, if one has developed multiple sclerosis, the chances of the other getting it are 25%. “If it were a strictly genetic condition, a condition in one twin would mean a 100% chance of getting it in the other,” says Dr. Gutman.

To put it into perspective, Dr. Gutman says that having multiple sclerosis in a close relative makes you 20 times higher than the general population, increasing your overall risk to 2% and 98% chances that you will never develop it. “Again, there is a genetic contribution, but by far the greatest risk is non-genetic.”

Other MS risk factors

Genetics is only part of the story. There are environmental triggers that can increase your risk for multiple sclerosis. These include:

  • Epstein-Barr infection
  • Low levels of vitamin D
  • Age
  • To be female
  • Have other autoimmune diseases
  • Smoking
  • Obesity

How to treat multiple sclerosis?

Experts agree that you should see your primary care physician (PCP) if you experience pain or unusual body sensations. Your PCP can assess symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis such as muscle weakness, numbness in the body, vision problems, and refer you to a neurologist for further testing.

Although Dr. Gutman says that people with family members who have multiple sclerosis don’t need to have routine preventative screening unless you start experiencing disturbing and inexplicable symptoms.

There is no single diagnostic test for multiple sclerosis. Instead, a neurologist may give you several imaging tests, blood tests, and a physical exam to rule out other illnesses. Dr. Stoll says that because multiple sclerosis has a genetic component, you’ll likely be asked if you have a family history of autoimmune diseases or a personal history of autoimmune diseases.

Dr. Picone says there are over 20 FDA-approved treatments for multiple sclerosis, and the earlier you start, the better your chances of getting a good result. If you receive an official diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, Dr. Stoll says your doctor will likely prescribe immunosuppressive drugs to partially suppress the immune system to prevent further damage to myelin. The second drug option are immunomodulators which manipulate immune function and how they react to a potential threat. Other treatments may involve injectable medications, oral therapies, and other intravenous therapies.

“These are very effective and can go a long way in preventing relapses, slowing progression, and helping you live as normal a life as possible,” says Dr. Picone.

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