Environmental factors – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:38:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental factors – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Environmental factors predict risk of death https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-predict-risk-of-death/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:38:18 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-predict-risk-of-death/ Besides high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, environmental factors such as air pollution are highly predictive of the risk of death, especially heart attack and stroke, according to a new study. . Led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the study showed that exposure to […]]]>

Besides high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, environmental factors such as air pollution are highly predictive of the risk of death, especially heart attack and stroke, according to a new study. .

Led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the study showed that exposure to above-average levels of outdoor air pollution increased the risk of death. by 20% and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease by 17%.

The use of wood or kerosene stoves, poorly ventilated by a chimney, to cook food or heat the house also increases the overall risk of death (by 23% and 9%) and the risk of cardiovascular death (by 36% and 19%). Living far from specialized medical clinics and near busy roads also increases the risk of death.

Publication in the journal PLOS ONE online June 24, the findings come from personal and environmental health data collected from 50,045 mostly poor rural villagers living in the northeastern region of Golestan in Iran. All of the study participants were over the age of 40 and agreed to have their health monitored during annual visits with researchers dating back to 2004.

The researchers say their latest investigation not only identifies the environmental factors that pose the greatest risk to heart and overall health, but also adds much-needed scientific evidence from people living in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional research on environmental risk factors, the researchers note, has favored urban populations in high-income countries with much greater access to modern health care services.

Compared to those with easier access to specialist medical services, those who live farther from clinics with catheterization labs capable of unblocking clogged arteries, for example, had a 1% increased risk of death every 10 kilometers. (6.2 miles) away. In Gulistan, most people live more than 80 kilometers from these modern facilities.

The study results also showed that the third of study participants who lived within 500 meters (1,640 feet) of a major road had a 13% increased risk of death.

“Our study highlights the role that the key environmental factors of indoor/outdoor air pollution, access to modern health services and proximity to noisy and polluted roads play in all causes of death and death. cardiovascular disease in particular,” said study lead author and cardiologist Rajesh Vedanthan, MD, MPH.

“Our findings help broaden the disease risk profile beyond age and traditional personal risk factors,” says Vedanthan, associate professor in the Department of Population Health and Department of Medicine at NYU Langone Health. .

“These results illustrate a new opportunity for health policymakers to reduce the burden of disease in their communities by mitigating the impact of environmental risk factors like air pollution on cardiovascular health,” says the author. study principal Michael Hadley, MD, a cardiology researcher and incoming assistant professor of medicine at Mount Sinai.

In contrast, the study showed that other environmental factors included in the analysis – low neighborhood income levels, increasing population density and too much exposure to nighttime light – were not independent predictors of risk of death, despite previous research in predominantly urban settings suggesting otherwise.

For the survey, the researchers analyzed data collected up to December 2018. They then created a predictive model on the overall risk of death and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

The research team plans to continue its analysis and hopes to apply the predictive model to other countries in an effort to refine its predictive ability. They say their new tool could serve as a guide to assess the effectiveness of environmental, lifestyle and personal health changes in reducing death rates around the world.

According to the World Health Organization, a quarter of all deaths worldwide are now attributable to environmental factors, including poor air and water quality, lack of sanitation and exposure to toxic chemicals.

Funding for the study was provided by US National Institutes of Health grant R21HL140474.

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Spatio-temporal distribution of tuberculosis and effects of environmental factors in China | BMC Infectious Diseases https://eco-label-tourism.com/spatio-temporal-distribution-of-tuberculosis-and-effects-of-environmental-factors-in-china-bmc-infectious-diseases/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 12:15:11 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/spatio-temporal-distribution-of-tuberculosis-and-effects-of-environmental-factors-in-china-bmc-infectious-diseases/ Shaweno D, Karmakar M, Alene KA, Ragonnet R, Clements AC, Trauer JM, et al. Methods used in the spatial analysis of tuberculosis epidemiology: a systematic review. BMC Med. 2018;16:193. Article Google Scholar Rao HX, Zhang X, Zhao L, Yu J, Ren W, Zhang XL, et al. Spatial transmission and meteorological determinants of tuberculosis incidence in […]]]>
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    Environmental factors determining traffic management decisions https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-determining-traffic-management-decisions/ Thu, 26 May 2022 11:11:43 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-factors-determining-traffic-management-decisions/ Yunex Traffic explains how they help local authorities monitor air quality and reduce emissions. Local authorities take their environmental responsibilities seriously, developing and deploying solutions that help measure, monitor and continually improve their impact, benefiting the people who live, work, visit and study in their cities. The Combined Liverpool City Area Authority (LCRA) is an […]]]>

    Yunex Traffic explains how they help local authorities monitor air quality and reduce emissions.

    Local authorities take their environmental responsibilities seriously, developing and deploying solutions that help measure, monitor and continually improve their impact, benefiting the people who live, work, visit and study in their cities. The Combined Liverpool City Area Authority (LCRA) is an excellent example of such a forward-thinking authority.

    Bringing together the six local authorities in the Liverpool City region – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral – LCRA has recently commissioned two initiatives which demonstrate its commitment to improving air quality, driving decarbonisation and create value. LCRA’s commitment to addressing the major issues that affect all of its citizens is reflected in these two programs, which contribute to solving environmental and air quality problems.

    Measure and monitor air quality

    LCRA has recognized that air quality monitoring is essential, not only to measure the impacts of different interventions over time, but also to develop and implement effective environmental strategies in real time. This database will help the Authority to define and orient its major strategic plans, as well as to shape tactical responses to traffic management in real time, based on the environmental results observed.

    To achieve this, LCRA awarded a contract to Yunex Traffic for the supply and installation of 37 Zephyr® air quality monitors. The monitors were installed in existing traffic signal locations across the six LCRA authorities and integrate with their existing Yunex Traffic Stratos traffic management and control systems. This will allow environmental data trends to be reviewed and analyzed and will help the Authority define environmental strategies based on real-time data on pollution, temperature and humidity, as well as on the quality levels of the air.

    Using innovative technology, Zephyr® sensors measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and ozone (O3) in real time, as well as fine particles PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. Carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) can also be measured, if required.

    Reduce CO2 emissions and save energy with retrofit technology

    Decarbonization and energy consumption are two key issues that LCRA has also addressed through affirmative action, ensuring the sustainability of the region’s transport infrastructure in a cost-effective way. As part of a Transforming Cities funding project, Yunex Traffic is working closely with the Authority to upgrade more than 750 traffic light sites in the region. The program will see existing halogen running lights upgraded with our LED center light source technology, which consumes less energy while providing improved visibility and reliability.

    This solution is expected to provide LCRA with energy and cost savings of approximately 75%, as well as significantly reducing the need for regular maintenance visits to replace and clean lamps. It is estimated that each year the new traffic lights will generate savings of over 1,300 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy savings of nearly £400,000, supporting improvements in environmental, economic and sustainability. social.

    The upgrade will retain existing road infrastructure, while providing LCRA with low maintenance, long life and energy efficient LED signs that provide better visibility in all weather and lighting conditions. This LED retrofit solution will allow authorities to leverage existing investments in equipment and infrastructure, especially with Yunex Traffic-enabled assets, and avoid the waste and costs associated with full retrofits.

    Thousands of traffic lights in the UK are still fitted with traditional incandescent halogen signal lamps, which will soon become obsolete. Our work with LCRA follows similar modernization schemes we have put in place for authorities across the UK, including in London and Greater Manchester, with each solution ensuring the future proofing of the LCRA’s road sign equipment. authority against the obsolescence of halogen lamps and any subsequent risk of lamp supply and maintenance.

    These air quality modernization and monitoring initiatives are just two examples of the many programs in place across the UK that are delivering operational and safety benefits to local authorities, supporting their drive to improve air quality and sustainability for the benefit of our cities. As LCRA recognises, “a modern and efficient transport system is what defines major international cities and urban regions” and we are delighted to help local authorities across the UK achieve their transport goals.

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    75% of global food and beverage organizations believe that environmental factors such as the depletion of natural resources impact their industry https://eco-label-tourism.com/75-of-global-food-and-beverage-organizations-believe-that-environmental-factors-such-as-the-depletion-of-natural-resources-impact-their-industry/ Mon, 23 May 2022 14:11:46 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/75-of-global-food-and-beverage-organizations-believe-that-environmental-factors-such-as-the-depletion-of-natural-resources-impact-their-industry/ LONDON, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks are increasingly affecting the food and beverage industry as it faces the combined challenges of controlling the environmental impact of production processes and supply chain disruption. In a new global survey, WTW W.T.W.one of the world’s leading advisory, brokerage and solutions companies, […]]]>

    LONDON, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks are increasingly affecting the food and beverage industry as it faces the combined challenges of controlling the environmental impact of production processes and supply chain disruption.

    In a new global survey, WTW W.T.W.one of the world’s leading advisory, brokerage and solutions companies, outlines the pressures the food and beverage industry is facing due to the turbulence of the past two years, from the impact of the pandemic to the disruption of the supply chain caused by global volatility, in particular with regard to the conflict between Russia and Ukraine, which is likely to have a significant impact on the global food supply.

    The investigation also revealed:

    • Brand and reputation, which is strongly linked to sustainability, is a significant risk (46%), but 55% had no reputation coverage.
    • 73% declare that their company does not have specific insurance for environmental risk and 67% do not have cover against cyber risk. 42% had no product recall coverage. All were classified as risk factors.
    • External factors beyond the organization’s control, including geopolitical factors (60%) and economic factors (60%) were considered the greatest challenges to medium-term risk mitigation.
    • Despite the challenges of the past two years, 70% are optimistic that the sector will be more profitable over the next two years with organic food (48%) topping the list of growth opportunities.

    The survey was conducted among 250 senior executives from food production, processing and manufacturing organizations, across the globe, and across different categories including confectionery, snacks, bakery, cereals, dairy , brewery, distillery and soft drinks.

    Direct and Optional Manager Garret Gaughan said: “While this investigation was undertaken prior to the current geopolitical situation, we recognize that the food and beverage sector is experiencing a wide variety of disruptions caused by a number of seismic events, notably the situation in Ukraine/Russia. However, this survey also demonstrates the growing awareness of the food and beverage sector of the impact of ESG on this sector, which also reflects the changing nature consumers who are increasingly concerned about sustainability and how their food is produced and the ingredients it contains, as well as the impact of climate change on the supply chain.”

    For more information, please visit:- https://www.wtwco.com/en-GB/Insights/2022/04/global-food-and-beverage-survey-report

    About WTW

    At WTW W.T.W., we provide data- and insight-driven solutions in the areas of people, risk and capital. By leveraging the global vision and local expertise of our colleagues serving 140 countries and markets, we help organizations refine their strategy, build organizational resilience, motivate their people and maximize their performance.

    By working hand-in-hand with our clients, we uncover opportunities for lasting success and provide insight that moves you.

    Learn more at www.wtwco.com.

    Media contact

    Sarah Booker: +44 7917 722040
    sarah.booker@willistowerswatson.com


    main logo

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    75% of global food and beverage organizations believe that environmental factors such as the depletion of natural resources are impacting their industry https://eco-label-tourism.com/75-of-global-food-and-beverage-organizations-believe-that-environmental-factors-such-as-the-depletion-of-natural-resources-are-impacting-their-industry/ Mon, 23 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/75-of-global-food-and-beverage-organizations-believe-that-environmental-factors-such-as-the-depletion-of-natural-resources-are-impacting-their-industry/ Willis Towers Watson Public Limited Company In WTW’s latest global food and beverage survey report, ESG risks are of greatest concern, with reputational risk increasingly seen as critical to success LONDON, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks are increasingly affecting the food and beverage industry as it faces the […]]]>

    Willis Towers Watson Public Limited Company

    In WTW’s latest global food and beverage survey report, ESG risks are of greatest concern, with reputational risk increasingly seen as critical to success

    LONDON, May 23, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks are increasingly affecting the food and beverage industry as it faces the combined challenges of controlling the environmental impact of production processes and supply chain disruption.

    In a new global survey, WTW (NASDAQ: WTW), one of the world’s leading advisory, brokerage and solutions companies, outlines the pressures facing the food and beverage industry due to the turmoil of the two recent years due to the impact of the pandemic to the disruption of the supply chain caused by global volatility, in particular with regard to the conflict between Russia and Ukraine, which is likely to have a significant impact on the global food supply.

    The investigation also revealed:

    • Brand and reputation, which is strongly linked to sustainability, is a significant risk (46%), but 55% had no reputation coverage.

    • 73% declare that their company does not have specific insurance for environmental risk and 67% do not have cover against cyber risk. 42% had no product recall coverage. All were classified as risk factors.

    • External factors beyond the organization’s control, including geopolitical factors (60%) and economic factors (60%) were considered the greatest challenges to medium-term risk mitigation.

    • Despite the challenges of the past two years, 70% are optimistic that the sector will be more profitable over the next two years with organic food (48%) topping the list of growth opportunities.

    The survey was conducted among 250 senior executives from food production, processing and manufacturing organizations, across the globe, and across different categories including confectionery, snacks, bakery, cereals, dairy , brewery, distillery and soft drinks.

    Direct and Optional Manager Garret Gaughan said: “While this investigation was undertaken prior to the current geopolitical situation, we recognize that the food and beverage sector is experiencing a wide variety of disruptions caused by a number of seismic events, notably the situation in Ukraine/Russia.However, this survey also demonstrates the growing awareness of the food and beverage sector of the impact of ESG on this sector, which also reflects the changing nature of consumers who are increasingly concerned about sustainability and how their food is produced and the ingredients it contains, as well as the impact of climate change on the supply chain.

    For more information, please visit:- https://www.wtwco.com/en-GB/Insights/2022/04/global-food-and-beverage-survey-report

    About WTW

    At WTW (NASDAQ: WTW), we provide data and insights-driven solutions in the areas of people, risk and capital. By leveraging the global vision and local expertise of our colleagues serving 140 countries and markets, we help organizations refine their strategy, build organizational resilience, motivate their people and maximize their performance.

    By working hand-in-hand with our clients, we uncover opportunities for lasting success and provide insight that moves you.

    Learn more at www.wtwco.com.

    Media contact

    Sarah Booker: +44 7917 722040
    sarah.booker@willistowerswatson.com

    ]]>
    Genetics and environmental factors contribute to how socioeconomic status shapes brain architecture https://eco-label-tourism.com/genetics-and-environmental-factors-contribute-to-how-socioeconomic-status-shapes-brain-architecture/ Thu, 19 May 2022 03:32:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/genetics-and-environmental-factors-contribute-to-how-socioeconomic-status-shapes-brain-architecture/ Your education, job, income, neighborhood you live in: Together, these factors are considered to represent socio-economic status (SES) and contribute to a variety of health and social outcomes, from physical and mental health to academic achievement and cognitive abilities. The brain acts as an obvious mediator between SES and many of these outcomes. But the […]]]>

    Your education, job, income, neighborhood you live in: Together, these factors are considered to represent socio-economic status (SES) and contribute to a variety of health and social outcomes, from physical and mental health to academic achievement and cognitive abilities.

    The brain acts as an obvious mediator between SES and many of these outcomes. But the mechanism by which it does this has remained unclear, and scientific studies have failed to show whether the impact of SES on the brain is encoded in our genes or dictated by the environment we live in.

    In a new report in Scientists progress, an international research team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is working to distinguish the relative contributions of genes and environment. Using the largest dataset ever applied to this question, the team found evidence that genetic and environmental influences contribute to the impact of SES in a complex interplay with effects that span a variety of brain regions.

    What we saw in the study is that part of the relationship between the brain and socio-economic status could be explained by genetics, but there is much more to this relationship that remains even after having consider genetics. This suggests that socio-economic conditions somehow underlie and may have additional negative influences on the social and economic disparities we see around us.”


    Gideon Nave, professor of marketing, Penn’s Wharton School and co-author of the study

    The work is the product of a large academic collaboration co-led by Philipp Koellinger de Nave and Vrije, a senior author of the study, called BIG BEAR, for Brain Imaging and Genetics in Behavioral Research. Martha Farah, another co-lead author of the work and a professor of psychology at Penn, is the lead researcher on the collaboration.

    Mapping the imprint of SES in the brain

    A large body of research has shown that SES has a signature in the brain.

    “I study the relationship between SES and the brain,” says Farah, “and one question that always comes up is: what causes these differences? Are the characteristics of SES encoded in the genome, or is it life experience at different levels of SES have these differences We were able to show that it is both, and also that genes and environment seem to exert different effects on different parts of the brain.

    In the work, the researchers used a massive dataset, the UK Biobank, to better understand these relative contributions. Previous studies either used smaller samples to investigate the link between the brain and SES or were inconsistent in defining SES. In contrast, the UK Biobank encompasses a wide range of data types, including brain scans and genomic sequencing as well as SES measurements, all collected in a standardized way. As a result, the research team was able to look for patterns among SSE factors and brain scan information for nearly 24,000 people.

    Each individual was assigned two SES “scores”, one combining income, occupation and education level, and a second combining neighborhood and occupation. Looking at the two scores together, they accounted for about 1.6% of the change in total brain volume; a discovery that had been seen previously.

    The researchers then dug deeper into the brain scan data, looking for specific brain regions that tracked with SES. They found a whole host of different brain regions linked to SES, including a few surprises. It should be noted that the cerebellum, not analyzed by many previous studies, showed a substantial link with SES. Located near the brainstem, the cerebellum is responsible for movement and balance as well as higher-level functions involving cognition and learning.

    “We see correlations emerging throughout the brain between SES and gray matter volume,” says Nave. “They are small, but with the large sample size of our study, we can be sure they are real.”

    Adds Hyeokmoon Kweon, the first author of the study and a doctoral student at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam: “It is important to note that these small regional correlations do not imply that the overall relationship between the brain and SES is also weak. In fact, we can predict a considerable amount of SES differences by aggregating these small brain-SES relationships.

    Nature versus nurture

    Since tens of thousands of individuals in the UK Biobank have also had their genomes sequenced, researchers could be looking for evidence of the genetic influence of SES in the brain. For this analysis, they created a unique index of SES and genetic linkages based on previous research that identified single nucleotide polymorphisms; one-letter variations of the DNA code; which are correlated with the SES.

    Using this index, they found that genetics could explain just over half of the relationship between gray matter volume and SES in some regions. The prefrontal cortex and insula – responsible for abilities such as communication, decision-making and empathy – were found to be particularly strongly governed by genetic influence. However, the relationship between SES and gray matter volume in other brain regions – the cerebellum and lateral temporal lobe, for example – was less correlated with genetics, indicating that the alterations may instead be influenced by the environment.

    Highlighting the influence that the environment can have, the researchers look at another variable in the data: body mass index (BMI). Although genetics plays a role in BMI, BMI also arises from non-genetic factors, including nutrition and physical activity. Even after controlling for known genetic links between brain anatomy and SES, they found that BMI may account for an average of 44% of the relationship between SES and gray matter volume.

    The finding suggests that environmental factors, not just genetic determinants, that can contribute to high BMI, such as poor diet and insufficient exercise, can also manifest in brain structure.

    A rationale for the intervention

    The researchers say their findings, far from suggesting that there is nothing that can be done to improve the impact of SES on the brain, rather underscore that thoughtful policymaking could address health and social disparities linked to differences of SSE.

    “The question of genetic or environmental contributions to differences in SES is controversial, in part because of its perceived implications for policy,” Farah said. “Many people think that if the difficulties of people with low SES are caused by the environment, then you can and must modify the environment, but then you come to an illogical conclusion: insofar as they are genetic, it There is nothing you can do.Genetic-based problems can also be improved by environmental interventions, such as dietary changes for people with severe innate metabolic syndrome PKU or glasses for common vision problems.

    Policy interventions could be a solution, the researchers say, addressing, for example, environmental justice concerns related to poorer neighborhoods. “If the air quality is worse in low-SES neighborhoods, it can trigger inflammation and other negative effects on the brain,” says Nave. “To cite just one example, regulations that mitigate air pollution could eliminate this damage and improve health and well-being at all levels, regardless of the neighborhood in which one lives. A preschool Free and high quality can do the same thing. Genetics, in this case, is not fate.”

    Further studies are needed, according to the team, to move from identifying correlations to determining causes in terms of understanding the environmental effects of SES on the brain. “With more and more data available,” says Kweon, “I think we will soon be able to produce such studies, which will help shape targeted interventions.”

    Source:

    Journal reference:

    Kweon, H. et al. (2022) Human Brain Anatomy Reflects Separable Genetic and Environmental Components of Socioeconomic Status. Scientists progress. doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abm2923.

    ]]>
    Authorities examine environmental factors as outbreak that killed 140 horses slows | New https://eco-label-tourism.com/authorities-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows-new/ Sat, 14 May 2022 03:15:30 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/authorities-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows-new/ A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors have all contributed to the spike in deaths . One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility […]]]>

    A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors have all contributed to the spike in deaths .

    One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility have died since April 23, according to situation reports released by the Bureau of Land Management. The cause appears to be a combination of diseases, and environmental factors such as wildfires and high winds may also have played a role.

    The good news is that the outbreak may be resolving itself: No deaths were reported on Tuesday or Thursday this week, the first days without deaths since the outbreak began.

    “Clinical observations” earlier this week “suggest that the horse population across the facility, including those in the severely affected West Douglas subpopulation, is returning to normal,” officials wrote. of the Bureau of Land Management. These observations, the report continues, “suggest that the epidemic is diminishing in intensity and beginning to resolve.”

    Now officials are working to better understand what exactly led to the sudden and intense deaths among a particular herd at the facility.

    When the first 10 horses died three weeks ago, state veterinarian Maggie Baldwin said, initial evaluation suggested the cause was neurological. Further monitoring of the herd revealed “significant respiratory disease,” she told members of the governor’s expert panel on emergency outbreak response.

    “There were a lot of horses that died in a very short time,” she said.

    Diagnostic tests sent to Colorado State University and the University of California, Davis have tested positive for equine flu, she said. Equine flu can infect and sicken a large portion of a herd, but it usually has a low mortality rate, Baldwin said, which made the rush of deaths unusual. The Strep zoo was also discovered in the dead animals, which further aggravated the condition of the horses.

    There are about 2,600 horses at the Cañon City facility, but the outbreak was particular to the West Douglas herd. The horses had been pulled from a wildfire area last year, Baldwin said, and they may have been “prone to lung damage” from the smoke. Mortality among the West Douglas herd exceeded 25%, she said. Between 40% and 60% of horses in the herd had symptoms, compared to about 20% of horses in other paddocks, according to the BLM situation report.

    Additionally, specifically affected parts of the herd had been removed from wildfire areas last year, and there had been “significant wind and dust issues” in the herd area in the weeks leading up to the outbreak. , Baldwin told a committee of Colorado medical experts on Thursday.

    The deaths were caused by a “complex outbreak of multifactorial respiratory disease involving the H3N8 equine influenza virus and the bacterium” that causes zoo strep in animals, the BLM wrote. Diagnostic labs are still working to determine the influence of these environmental factors, Baldwin and the federal agency said.

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    Officials examine environmental factors as outbreak that killed 140 horses slows https://eco-label-tourism.com/officials-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/officials-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows/ A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors likely all contributed to the spike in death. One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility have […]]]>

    A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors likely all contributed to the spike in death.

    One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility have died since April 23, according to situation reports released by the Bureau of Land Management. The cause appears to be a combination of diseases, and environmental factors such as wildfires and high winds may also have played a role.

    The good news is that the outbreak may be resolving itself: No deaths were reported on Tuesday or Thursday this week, the first days without deaths since the outbreak began.

    “Clinical observations” earlier this week “suggest that the horse population across the facility, including those in the severely affected West Douglas subpopulation, is returning to normal,” officials wrote. of the Bureau of Land Management. These observations, the report continues, “suggest that the epidemic is diminishing in intensity and beginning to resolve.”

    Now officials are working to better understand what exactly led to the sudden and intense deaths among a particular herd at the facility.

    When the first 10 horses died three weeks ago, state veterinarian Maggie Baldwin said, the initial veterinary evaluation suggested the cause was neurological. Further monitoring of the herd revealed “significant respiratory disease,” she told members of the governor’s expert panel on emergency outbreak response.

    “There were a lot of horses that died in a very short time,” she said.

    Diagnostic tests sent to Colorado State University and the University of California, Davis have tested positive for equine flu, she said. Equine flu can infect and sicken a large portion of a herd, but it usually has a low mortality rate, Baldwin said, which made the rush of deaths unusual. The Strep zoo was also discovered in the dead animals, which further aggravated the condition of the horses.

    There are about 2,600 horses at the Cañon City facility, but the outbreak was particular to the West Douglas herd. The horses had been pulled from a wildfire area last year, Baldwin said, and they may have been “prone to lung damage” from the smoke. Mortality among the West Douglas herd exceeded 25%, she said. Between 40% and 60% of horses in the herd had symptoms, compared to about 20% of horses in other paddocks, according to the situation report from the Bureau of Land Management.

    Additionally, specifically affected parts of the herd had been removed from wildfire areas last year, and there had been “significant wind and dust issues” in the herd area in the weeks leading up to the outbreak. , Baldwin told a committee of Colorado medical experts on Thursday.

    The deaths were caused by a “complex outbreak of multifactorial respiratory disease involving the H3N8 equine influenza virus and the bacterium” that causes zoo streptococcal disease in animals, the Bureau of Land Management wrote. Diagnostic labs are still working to determine the influence of these environmental factors, Baldwin and the federal agency said.

    ]]>
    Authorities examine environmental factors as outbreak that killed 140 horses slows | Health https://eco-label-tourism.com/authorities-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows-health/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/authorities-examine-environmental-factors-as-outbreak-that-killed-140-horses-slows-health/ A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors likely all contributed to the spike in death. One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility have […]]]>

    A disease outbreak that has killed more than 140 horses at a federal facility in Cañon City is slowing, officials said this week, and evidence suggests equine flu, streptococci and environmental factors likely all contributed to the spike in death.

    One hundred and forty-four horses from the Cañon City Wild Horse and Burro Facility have died since April 23, according to situation reports released by the Bureau of Land Management. The cause appears to be a combination of diseases, and environmental factors such as wildfires and high winds may also have played a part.

    The good news is that the outbreak may be resolving itself: No deaths were reported on Tuesday or Thursday this week, the first days without deaths since the outbreak began.

    “Clinical observations” earlier this week “suggest that the horse population across the facility, including those in the severely affected West Douglas subpopulation, is returning to normal,” officials wrote. of the Bureau of Land Management. These observations, the report continues, “suggest that the epidemic is diminishing in intensity and beginning to resolve.”

    Now officials are working to better understand what exactly led to the sudden and intense deaths among a particular herd at the facility.

    When the first 10 horses died three weeks ago, state veterinarian Maggie Baldwin said, the initial veterinary evaluation suggested the cause was neurological. Further monitoring of the herd revealed “significant respiratory disease,” she told members of the governor’s expert panel on emergency outbreak response.

    “There were a lot of horses that died in a very short time,” she said.

    Diagnostic tests sent to Colorado State University and the University of California, Davis have tested positive for equine flu, she said. Equine flu can infect and sicken a large portion of a herd, but it usually has a low mortality rate, Baldwin said, which made the rush of deaths unusual. The Strep zoo was also discovered in the dead animals, which further aggravated the condition of the horses.

    There are about 2,600 horses at the Cañon City facility, but the outbreak was unique to the West Douglas herd. The horses had been pulled from a wildfire area last year, Baldwin said, and they may have been “prone to lung damage” from the smoke. Mortality among the West Douglas herd exceeded 25%, she said. Between 40% and 60% of horses in the herd had symptoms, compared to about 20% of horses in other paddocks, according to the situation report from the Bureau of Land Management.

    Additionally, specifically affected parts of the herd had been removed from wildfire areas last year, and there had been “significant wind and dust issues” in the herd area in the weeks leading up to the outbreak. , Baldwin told a committee of Colorado medical experts on Thursday.

    The deaths were caused by a “complex outbreak of multifactorial respiratory disease involving the H3N8 equine influenza virus and the bacterium” that causes zoo streptococcal disease in animals, the Bureau of Land Management wrote. Diagnostic labs are still working to determine the influence of these environmental factors, Baldwin and the federal agency said.

    ]]>
    Yale researchers quantify genetic and environmental factors in cancer – PharmaLive https://eco-label-tourism.com/yale-researchers-quantify-genetic-and-environmental-factors-in-cancer-pharmalive/ Fri, 13 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/yale-researchers-quantify-genetic-and-environmental-factors-in-cancer-pharmalive/ Every day there are news about new knowledge about cancer. Often this is related to how a drug works against a specific type of cancer. For example, this week only, Therapeutic Achilles dose the first patient with custom clonal reactive neo-antigen (cNeT) T cells made using the company’s higher-dose VELOS process. The phase I/IIa CHIRON […]]]>

    Every day there are news about new knowledge about cancer. Often this is related to how a drug works against a specific type of cancer.

    For example, this week only, Therapeutic Achilles dose the first patient with custom clonal reactive neo-antigen (cNeT) T cells made using the company’s higher-dose VELOS process. The phase I/IIa CHIRON trial is evaluating the drug in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). She also initiated enrollment in Cohort B of the THETIS trial of cNeT in combination with a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor for metastatic malignant melanoma.

    Somewhere else, Elpiscience Biopharma received the green light from the United States Food and Drug Administration to initiate a phase I trial of ES014 in advanced solid tumors. E014 is an anti-CD39xTGF-beta bispecific antibody that simultaneously targets the CD39-adenosine and TGF-beta pathways.

    Less common is something fundamental to our understanding of cancer. Over the past few weeks, researchers from Yale University published research in Molecular biology and evolution describing a novel molecular analysis approach to quantifying DNA changes that contribute to cancer growth.

    Of course, environmental factors can lead to genetic mutations leading to cancer. For example, ultraviolet light or tobacco use. It is, however, much more difficult to determine the extent to which a person’s cancer has developed due to these environmental factors or aging and bad luck. But Yale researchers have developed an approach that quantifies the contribution of each mutation to cancer.

    “We can now answer the question – to the best of our knowledge – ‘What is the underlying source of the key mutations that turned these cells into cancer instead of remaining normal tissue?'” Jeffrey Townsend, Ph.D. , the Elihu professor of biostatistics in the department of biostatistics at the Yale School of Public Health, said.

    They were able to combine an ability to predict how specific factors cause specific mutations with a method that quantifies the contribution of each mutation to cancer. “This gives us the final piece of the puzzle to connect what happened to your genome with cancer,” Townsend said. “It’s really direct: we look into your tumor, and we see the signal written in your tumor of what caused this cancer.”

    For example, some tumors such as bladder and skin tend to grow more due to preventable factors. Prostate cancers and gliomas (types of brain tumors) are largely due to age-related processes.

    Specific locations or even professions that have unusually high levels of cancer might be able to use the method to identify cases of exposure to carcinogens, Townsend suggests. “It can be useful to give people feedback that lets them know what caused their cancer,” he said. “Not everyone may want to know. But on a personal level, it can be helpful for people to attribute their cancer to its cause.

    Currently, their methodology does not take into account all the genetic changes that lead to cancers. Further research will be needed to fully understand all of the genetic changes associated with cancer, and there are many more, even rare cancers, to be evaluated.

    The authors wrote that “mutational processes in tumors create distinctive patterns of mutations, composed of neutral ‘passenger’ mutations and oncogenic factors that have quantifiable effects on the proliferation and survival of cancer cell lines. Increases in proliferation and survival are mediated by natural selection, which can be quantified by comparing the frequency with which we detect substitutions to the frequency with which we expect to detect substitutions assuming neutrality.

    DNA and genetics research concept. The hand holds a glowing DNA molecule in the hand.
    Source: Organic Space

    Most of the variants that they can assess with whole-exome tumor sequencing are neutral or nearly neutral. Therefore, the processes that cause the majority of mutations might not be the primary source of carcinogenic mutations.

    By evaluating 24 types of cancer, the research team identified the contributions of mutational processes to each oncogenic variant and quantified the extent to which each process contributed to tumor development. In addition to their findings in melanomas and lung cancer, gliomas and prostate adenocarcinomas, they found that preventable mutations associated with exposure to pathogens and l Apolipoprotein B mRNAs account for a high percentage of head and neck cancers, bladder, cervix, and breast cancers.

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