Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 05:30:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 A knowledge-based ecosystem solves environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/a-knowledge-based-ecosystem-solves-environmental-problems/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:06:08 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/a-knowledge-based-ecosystem-solves-environmental-problems/ TEHRAN – The Ministry of Environment (DOE) has decided to use the capabilities of knowledge-based enterprises to solve environmental problems, said DOE Chief Ali Salajeqeh. So far, 437 knowledge-based companies active in the environmental field have been identified, he said, IRNA reported on Wednesday. Companies have been divided according to their environmental expertise, such as […]]]>

TEHRAN – The Ministry of Environment (DOE) has decided to use the capabilities of knowledge-based enterprises to solve environmental problems, said DOE Chief Ali Salajeqeh.

So far, 437 knowledge-based companies active in the environmental field have been identified, he said, IRNA reported on Wednesday.

Companies have been divided according to their environmental expertise, such as waste, wildlife, pollution, etc. so that the capabilities can be used in all environmental areas, he said, adding that they have entered the operational phase and we are currently using domestic resources. production for environmental monitoring.

The leader of the Islamic Revolution, Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei, has designated the current Iranian year (March 2022-March 2023) as “the year of production: based on knowledge and job creation”. Strengthening knowledge-based enterprises is on the agenda, raising hopes to reduce obstacles on the path to development.

Technologies protecting the environment

The use of digital and advanced technologies plays an effective role in protecting the environment, Salajeqeh said, noting that technologies in this field should be used in areas such as surveillance and monitoring, census and management. garbage.

The Iranian House of Innovation and Technology, as an exhibition venue for Iranian technologies, hosted 30 technological achievements in the field of environment.

Among the most important achievements are the elimination of unpleasant odors from sewage treatment plants, wastewater treatment, biodegradable polymers, disposal of hospital waste, electric and heat-generating microturbines, electric motorcycles, four-wheeled motorcycles, lithium batteries and wind turbines.

knowledge-based ecosystem

Over the past year, in order to achieve a resilient and knowledge-based economy, the Vice Presidency for Science and Technology has implemented a series of activities to further develop the innovation ecosystem and technology in the country.

The Vice Presidency for Science and Technology was founded in 2006 as one of the subsets of the government with the slogan of moving from an oil-based economy to a knowledge-based economy, aiming to increase the technological capabilities and innovation to generate wealth of knowledge and improve people’s quality of life.

Thus, more than 7,000 knowledge-based enterprises and 1,600 creative enterprises have so far been registered and started their activities.

The fields of biotechnology, agriculture, food industries, chemical technologies, aircraft maintenance, steel, gas, pharmaceuticals, medical equipment and medicine, petroleum, electronics and telecommunications, information technology and computer software are some of the sectors in which researchers from technology companies work. .

FB/MG

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Farm bill must include environmental issues, letter says https://eco-label-tourism.com/farm-bill-must-include-environmental-issues-letter-says/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:45:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/farm-bill-must-include-environmental-issues-letter-says/ WASHINGTON – A letter signed by more than 150 organizations and addressed to President Joe Biden calls for the next farm bill to address economic inequality, racial divides, hunger, climate change, nutrition and food security while supporting farmers, workers and communities. Groups signing the Sept. 13 letter included the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, AFL-CIO, […]]]>

WASHINGTON – A letter signed by more than 150 organizations and addressed to President Joe Biden calls for the next farm bill to address economic inequality, racial divides, hunger, climate change, nutrition and food security while supporting farmers, workers and communities. Groups signing the Sept. 13 letter included the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, AFL-CIO, Center for Food Safety, Center for Science in the Public Interest, Plant Based Food Institute, Sierra Club , The Land Institute and the Union of Concerned Scientists.

“President Biden has shown a deep understanding of the urgency of addressing the challenges facing our country, including the climate crisis, racial injustice and economic insecurity, and how to transform our food and agriculture system into one more resilient, equitable and sustainable is the key to addressing these challenges,” said Ricardo Salvador, PhD, senior scientist and director of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ food and environment program. “The Farm Bill provides a pathway to build on historic investments in the Cut Inflation Act, reinforce key administrative actions already taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and advance the President’s values.” . “

To address racial justice, the farm bill could confront past discrimination, address systemic racism within the U.S. Department of Agriculture and invest in underserved communities, according to the letter. To fight hunger, the farm bill should protect and strengthen food assistance programs. The Farm Bill, to address the climate crisis, could invest in technical assistance and financial incentives that allow farmers and ranchers to reduce their emissions.

Implementing agricultural and labor policies could help farmers and workers withstand extreme weather conditions and protect workers from pesticides. The farm bill should also address pathogens that come from farms and endanger the US food supply, according to the letter.

Congress reauthorizes the Farm Bill every five years. The next farm bill is scheduled for 2023 since the last farm bill, also known as the Farm Improvement Act of 2018, was passed in December 2018.

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2 Go broadcaster Ben Fordham says solar panels have environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/2-go-broadcaster-ben-fordham-says-solar-panels-have-environmental-issues/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 06:04:11 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/2-go-broadcaster-ben-fordham-says-solar-panels-have-environmental-issues/ One of Australia’s most prominent radio hosts has reignited the debate over solar panels, saying the “clean, green source of energy” poses environmental concerns. Sydney Radio 2GB host Ben Fordham has raised questions about the panels’ ‘shaky’ and ‘flawed’ business case after being inundated with complaints from listeners now doubting a push to make the […]]]>

One of Australia’s most prominent radio hosts has reignited the debate over solar panels, saying the “clean, green source of energy” poses environmental concerns.

Sydney Radio 2GB host Ben Fordham has raised questions about the panels’ ‘shaky’ and ‘flawed’ business case after being inundated with complaints from listeners now doubting a push to make the switch.

Solar power is expected to account for 50% of Australia’s power capacity by 2030, which NSW Treasurer Matt Kean called “critical to the modernization of our electricity system”.

But Fordham says authorities can’t hide the fact that many question marks remain on the signs, even though half a million NSW homes have installed them alone, including himself.

A big question mark remains over the cost and environmental effectiveness of solar panels, according to a broadcaster (pictured, panels being installed)

It costs Australians on average $10,000 for the panels in addition to $16,000 for the battery to get the most out of the system, the host said.

“People have been installing solar panels in hopes of saving money in the long run,” he said.

“But more and more experts are pointing out that ‘savings day’ is getting pushed back further and further.”

“Auditors have commented to us that after making the switch, they don’t really save any money.

“It looks like people are starting to have buyer’s remorse.”

A woman told Fordham that her household was now paying $80 more than a quarter before switching to solar power two years ago because they reimbursed the cost of the panels.

Fordham cited research by leading consumer groups to back up his claims.

The Canstar Blue review website says there is no black and white answer as to whether solar batteries are worth the investment as it depends on individual circumstances.

“Despite the savings on ongoing utility bills, the unit is unlikely to pay for itself…until the battery warranty expires,” the site says.

Choice Magazine says the results of a years-long Australian trial of solar storage batteries were not encouraging.

At least half a million NSW homes have solar panels, according to the state government.  Pictured is a new home with solar panels in Sydney's North West

At least half a million NSW homes have solar panels, according to the state government. Pictured is a new home with solar panels in Sydney’s North West

Ben Fordham (pictured with wife Jodie Speers) has described the business case for solar panels as flimsy and flawed, despite having them installed in his home

Ben Fordham (pictured with wife Jodie Speers) has described the business case for solar panels as flimsy and flawed, despite having them installed in his home

Economist Judith Sloan warned this week that a government push towards renewables will not bring electricity prices down anytime soon.

“On sunny, windy days, the price can be low, sometimes negative, during the day, but the price shoots up at night when the sun goes down and the wind drops often,” she wrote in The Australian. .

“At this point, renewable energy is not useful and only reliable or firming generation can be used to meet demand.”

Fordham stressed that environmental factors are also a big concern as Australia prepares for another chaotic La Nina system.

He added that the vast majority of solar panels in the world are made in China, which will increase to 95% in the next decade.

Many households have had solar panels installed in hopes of saving money in the long run, but have seen their electricity bills soar

Many households have had solar panels installed in hopes of saving money in the long run, but have seen their electricity bills soar

“So even though Australia has been a key player in inventing solar technology…we’re counting on China,” Fordham said.

‘So you have waste. By 2025, NSW will generate up to 10,000 tonnes of waste a year – from solar panels and batteries. By 2035, this could reach 70,000 tons per year.

Fordham ended the segment by admitting that solar power could be a big part of Australia’s future.

“But right now the industry is suffering from a branding problem,” he said.

‘The sun doesn’t shine…as much as we used to.

“People aren’t saving money…as much as they expected.

“And the so-called ‘clean and green energy source’ has its own environmental issues!”

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Episcopal bishop credits education AND his work on environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/episcopal-bishop-credits-education-and-his-work-on-environmental-issues/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 02:37:36 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/episcopal-bishop-credits-education-and-his-work-on-environmental-issues/ Bishop of California Mark Andrusan Episcopal Church national leader in the fight against climate change, says growing up in Roane County, hiking in the Smokies and attending the University of Tennessee set him on his career to care about the spiritual and material aspects of our planet. His advocacy work has taken him to public […]]]>

Bishop of California Mark Andrusan Episcopal Church national leader in the fight against climate change, says growing up in Roane County, hiking in the Smokies and attending the University of Tennessee set him on his career to care about the spiritual and material aspects of our planet.

His advocacy work has taken him to public places in Paris and other countries and Dakota Access Pipeline demonstrations in Standing Rock, North Dakota.

California Episcopal Bishop Marc Andrus and his wife, Sheila, were among a group of interfaith leaders from around the world working on behalf of climate change goals at the United Nations Framework Convention Conference of Parties on climate change, or COP21, in Paris in 2015. Andrus is in the back row, second from the right, standing behind his wife who is holding a drum.

At a recent Lambeth conference of Anglican communities in England, he helped launch a Communion Forest on the grounds of London Palace, the official residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. The initiative was planned by a small team from the Anglican Communion Environmental Network and the Anglican Alliance, of which he was a member.

The simple act of planting trees until they become groves helps remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere, Andrus said.

UN Climate Change Conference

In November in Sharp El-Sheikh, Egypt, he will lead the Episcopal Church delegation representing the Presiding Bishop Michael Curry at the 2022 United Nations climate change conference. It’s officially called the 27th session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP27.

“COP27 gives us the opportunity to work in partnership with interfaith representatives around the world – learning from each other and amplifying voices of faith on climate change and environmental degradation,” he said. he said in a statement released by the Episcopal Press Services.

He later said in an interview with this columnist that everyone considers the land sacred. “It will take many actions – millions – to heal the planet. It seems that Episcopalians should be (at climate change conventions) on the side of scientists and policy makers.

The Rt. Rev. Marc Handley Andrus of the Episcopal Diocese of California spoke about his views on climate change and his life in East Tennessee in a Zoom interview Aug. 25 in San Francisco and in some chat of emails. “Growing up in East Tennessee (offered) so much beauty,” he said.

The 61-year-old Bishop was born in Oak Ridge and raised in Kingston. His father, Francis “Andy” Andrus, worked for Union Carbide on the business side, and his mother, Frances, was a teacher. A sister, Barbara Foster, lives in Farragut.

California Bishop Marc Andrus, left wearing glasses, watches an umbrella rise as part of a worship service

Californian Bishop Marc Andrus, left wearing glasses, watches an umbrella rise as part of a ‘pop-up’ worship service in a public place during the 2022 United Nations climate change conference in Paris. Andrus was an Episcopal leader working on behalf of an agreement to reduce carbon emissions.

Swimming in a toxic mercury dump

His memories of the area include swimming in the Clinch River, where tons of mercury, a heavy toxic material, is now known to have been released. His father died of cancer when he was 14, and Andrus says it was because of problems with radiation exposure.

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“Looking at this beautiful water, we were swimming in this river with all this mercury,” he said.

And this type of situation is happening all over the world, with decisions on environmental issues influencing outcomes that affect race, poverty, economy and nations, he said.

When California Bishop Marc Andrus announced a 2024 retirement plan on July 22, he thanked his wife, Sheila, for her support during his years.  The couple, who have ties to East Tennessee, have worked together on <a class=environmental issues.” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/pMIBfLTCCvPWbHBL1NvZUw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTcyMA–/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/fkS0mv98VYbbBgHcUEkqSA–~B/aD0zMDI0O3c9NDAzMjthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/knox-news-the-knoxville-news-sentinel/c5a8ee864f5d77eca84448aa9623c408″/>

When California Bishop Marc Andrus announced a 2024 retirement plan on July 22, he thanked his wife, Sheila, for her support during his years. The couple, who have ties to East Tennessee, have worked together on environmental issues.

Andrus went to UT to study soil science and plant nutrition in agriculture and majored in religious studies. “They were both great departments,” he said. He also met his wife there. She is dr. Sheila MooreAndrus, a native of Maryville, who has had a career as an environmental scientist, including with the US Forest Service, where she led the agency’s insect research. The two appear frequently in programs together on the environment.

After earning his bachelor of science degree from UT in 1979, Marc Andrus earned a master’s degree in social science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Blacksburg State University, Virginia, and a master’s degree in theology from Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria. He was a regional planner and served several episcopal institutions as priest or rector. He was Bishop Suffragan for the Episcopal Diocese in Alabama before moving to San Francisco as bishop in 2006. He announced he would retire in 2024 and eventually move to Staunton, Virginia.

Andrus likes to talk about his activist role in his work for eco-justice.

California Episcopal Bishop Marc Andrus in hat meets with other bishops at the recent Lambeth Conference in London to launch a community forest initiative.  The East Tennessean alum is one of the leading voices of the Episcopal Church's climate change initiative.  To the right of the tree is Central American Bishop Julio Murray.

California Episcopal Bishop Marc Andrus in hat meets with other bishops at the recent Lambeth Conference in London to launch a community forest initiative. The East Tennessean alum is one of the leading voices of the Episcopal Church’s climate change initiative. To the right of the tree is Central American Bishop Julio Murray.

In Paris in 2015, where nations gathered at COP21 at the Parc des Expositions and reached an agreement to set voluntary targets for reducing global warming, Andrus was part of an interfaith group that advocated for the policy.

What he described as a ‘pop-up’ worship service, complete with umbrellas, featured ‘musical offerings, time for reflection, meditation and sharing in the public square – a beautiful start for the Episcopal Church of the COP”.

Former President Donald Trump withdrew from the Paris Agreement in 2020, but President Joe Biden returned to it.

Similar support for climate change initiatives was organized at UN climate conferences in Morocco, Germany and Poland in subsequent years. In Katowice, Poland, many residents are moving away from coal mining as a profession and need help finding new jobs while older miners need pensions, he said .

Supporting the efforts of miners has shown how bringing clean energy also fosters new opportunities, he said.

The importance of simply planting trees

Just planting trees is really like planting a new community, he says. Once the trees are planted and remain there, the environment is cooler. In developed areas, this allows for fewer cars and less parking, helping to reduce carbon emissions.

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“In Knoxville, when it’s over 100 degrees, the majority of Knoxville residents in low-income areas are warmer than those in high-income areas. The reason is all these trees,” he said.

At the recent Lambeth Conference, the Communion Forest was started in the palace gardens which had been gardened or cultivated for over 1000 years, but the grass was now brown and withered from the heat and the drought,” Andrus wrote in a message to his diocese.

“Not only has the Communion Forest initiative been well received by Bishops and Spouses, but I have also witnessed that across the Communion, Bishops and Spouses recognize the climate emergency as one of their top concerns. Finally, I believe that the Anglican Communion and the Episcopal Church, while climate action will be very diverse, I believe that we will continue to focus on eco-justice, how environmental degradation and climate change weigh disproportionately on already vulnerable populations,” he said.

Georgiana Vines is a retired associate editor of News Sentinel. She can be contacted at gvpolitics@hotmail.com.

This article originally appeared on Knoxville News Sentinel: Vines: Episcopal Bishop attributes education to environmental concern

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Structured Production Methods and Environmental Issues: Perspectives on Bottom-Up and “Laterally” Co-Created Science https://eco-label-tourism.com/structured-production-methods-and-environmental-issues-perspectives-on-bottom-up-and-laterally-co-created-science/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 09:46:34 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/structured-production-methods-and-environmental-issues-perspectives-on-bottom-up-and-laterally-co-created-science/ This article is a combination of a methodological article and a treatise examining some of the theories that underpin participatory methods in stakeholder engagement in science. Emphasis is placed on methods that involve the co-design of structured products (maps, models, games, stories, etc.) that can be interpreted by both scientists and non-scientists – thus creating […]]]>

This article is a combination of a methodological article and a treatise examining some of the theories that underpin participatory methods in stakeholder engagement in science. Emphasis is placed on methods that involve the co-design of structured products (maps, models, games, stories, etc.) that can be interpreted by both scientists and non-scientists – thus creating “sides ” rather than descendants or descendants. bottom-up perspectives.

The authors describe how some established and new methods (participatory agent-based modeling, co-construction of computer games, and participatory social network mapping) can be used to engage stakeholders in iterative and constructivist communication, enabling researchers and stakeholders to co-create a structured “reality”. The authors discuss how these approaches support and contribute to scientific productions that better represent the reality of the participants.

The authors examine the impacts of these approaches used in ecosystem services, agricultural adaptation and disaster risk management. They find that such representations provide opportunities for communication and spaces for reflection and constructivist learning. They conclude that structured outcomes allow stakeholders (participants and researchers) to mirror their human-environmental system to collaboratively reflect on gaps and issues of understanding.

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Locals are informed about environmental issues | Local News https://eco-label-tourism.com/locals-are-informed-about-environmental-issues-local-news/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/locals-are-informed-about-environmental-issues-local-news/ The Environmental Issues Forum covered a wide range of topics, from nurdles to dredging to drought, on Saturday, August 20, at Veterans of Foreign War Post 4403. The event, hosted by the Calhoun County Democratic Club and Maclovio Perez, candidate for Congressional District 27, featured a variety of speakers who covered topics including drought, water […]]]>

The Environmental Issues Forum covered a wide range of topics, from nurdles to dredging to drought, on Saturday, August 20, at Veterans of Foreign War Post 4403.

The event, hosted by the Calhoun County Democratic Club and Maclovio Perez, candidate for Congressional District 27, featured a variety of speakers who covered topics including drought, water rights as well as environmental issues. In progress.

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Tackling environmental problems is more complicated than simply reducing emissions: farmer https://eco-label-tourism.com/tackling-environmental-problems-is-more-complicated-than-simply-reducing-emissions-farmer/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 02:52:54 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/tackling-environmental-problems-is-more-complicated-than-simply-reducing-emissions-farmer/ An Australian farmer called on the government to take a constructive and positive approach to environmental issues, warning that overly simplified methods could have consequences and would not solve the complexity of the problems on the ground. Mark Davie, chairman of industry group Beef Sustainability Australia, told The Epoch Times that society and science should […]]]>

An Australian farmer called on the government to take a constructive and positive approach to environmental issues, warning that overly simplified methods could have consequences and would not solve the complexity of the problems on the ground.

Mark Davie, chairman of industry group Beef Sustainability Australia, told The Epoch Times that society and science should find a solution that balances carbon reduction goals with the need to maintain food production for a growing world population.

“I’m all for initiatives that can reduce emissions while working in the productivity drivers of industry, because we still have to feed people,” he said.

Davie warned that without considering the need to feed people, “simple solutions” like reducing methane emissions could be effective in one aspect, but can come at the cost of people’s livelihoods, as well as farmers and small businesses.

The Queensland producer cited an example in Ireland where farmers are being forced to reduce herd numbers to reduce emissions, calling it a “low-hanging fruit approach”.

“[Given the fact that] people in other parts of the world are starving, I just wonder if that’s really the moral high ground in this situation.

Davie further warned that an overly simplified approach could lead to solutions that are not cost effective; for example, “We will end up with a case where we have large corporations offsetting carbon emissions by planting trees on farmland.”

Australia’s climate debate recently took place at federal level when the lower house passed the Climate Change Bill, which sets the target of reducing emissions by 43% by 2030 as a minimum standard.

However, the opposition and some independents have expressed concern that the 14-page proposal lacks detail on how the target might be achieved.

Calls to focus more on solutions, not negativity

This follows the release of the State of the Environment Report, which depicts a dire situation for Australia’s environment and a deteriorating landscape and biodiversity.

“I have to admit – maybe I should have known – that I had no idea how far behind we were in responding to these environmental flows until I took over this portfolio,” said the Minister of Environment Tanya Plibersek on July 18 as she attacked the former coalition government. .

“Years of warnings that have been ignored or kept secret. Promises made but not kept. Questionable behavior undermining public trust, brutal budget cuts, willful negligence,” she alleged.

Epoch Times Photo
A display of Australian beef is seen in a butcher shop in the Melbourne suburb of Yarraville on May 12, 2020. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP via Getty Images)

But Davie noted that some of the aspects of the report “could relate to domestic politics” and could damage the reputation of Australian farmers overseas when they “really do the right thing”.

“We can back that up with our own measurements and reports,” Davie told The Epoch Times. “If you look at the national accounts, we are back to 1990 levels of forest cover… We have [also] has gone from 50% healthy land cover levels at the end of last September (end of the dry season) to now 78%”.

“So the challenge with the environment is that you can choose different time frames to measure things and have a different story.

“I think it has to be a holistic conversation.”

Epoch Times Photo

One of the factors behind the inaccuracies in the state of the environment report’s descriptions of the environment is that Australia “doesn’t really have good metrics to measure things like biodiversity or the quality of our environments like the canopy,” he added.

“This is the great challenge of the report on the state of the environment. The environment is about the quality, not the quantity, of a satellite’s canopy and we really need to focus on that.

The Queenslander also urged the government to focus on solutions rather than negativity.

“I think the future belongs to the optimist,” Davie noted, saying farmers “are also trying to communicate to a global population about how we operate here, and we can back that up with our own metrics and report industry is doing to demonstrate where we are not causing this damage to the environment.

Davie added that the farmers and industry members he represents are very eager to engage with the new government and its ministers – Plibersek and Agriculture Minister Senator Murray Watt – as they can help provide the most informed view of the situation on the ground as opposed to top-down approaches which tend to be more quantitative.

“We manage 50% of the Australian landscape. I don’t think the government can afford to do this, and we can do this productively, feed people and get results. We just want to get in the room and figure out how to do it,” he said.

“There are a lot of things producers do every day,” he added of private sustainability initiatives. “Beef producers and agricultural producers would have dozens of small environmental projects that they run on their own property that they don’t classify as a project [with the government].”

On his own property, Davie was able to eliminate hundreds of feral dogs to see a population of black swans recover. “There are some things we do that we probably don’t tell our customers that they would like to know about.”

Nina Nguyen

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Nina Nguyen is a Sydney-based journalist. She covers Australian news with a focus on social, cultural and identity issues. She is fluent in Vietnamese. Contact her at nina.nguyen@epochtimes.com.au.

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Poll: Environmental Issues Top of Mind for Pennsylvania Voters in 2022 | Friday morning coffee https://eco-label-tourism.com/poll-environmental-issues-top-of-mind-for-pennsylvania-voters-in-2022-friday-morning-coffee/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/poll-environmental-issues-top-of-mind-for-pennsylvania-voters-in-2022-friday-morning-coffee/ Good Friday morning, Dear Researchers. You don’t have to look far these days to find evidence that climate change is hitting Americans where they live. Of flash flood in the upper Midwest to forest fires that are reshaping California and the American West, scientists agree that climate change causes the incidence of extreme weather conditions. […]]]>

Good Friday morning, Dear Researchers.

You don’t have to look far these days to find evidence that climate change is hitting Americans where they live. Of flash flood in the upper Midwest to forest fires that are reshaping California and the American West, scientists agree that climate change causes the incidence of extreme weather conditions.

And as a new poll clearly shows, concerns about climate change are top of mind for Pennsylvania voters heading into the 2022 midterms. And voters say they’re more likely to support lawmakers states that support limits on methane and carbon emissions.

Sixty-two percent of respondents to Global Strategy Group Survey controlled by the political arms of the Environmental Defense Fund and the Natural Resources Defense Council say state legislators should “make reducing air pollution a priority”, and an equal number believe the state needs more rules to protect Commonwealth air and water from oil and gas pollution.

As a reminder, the 203 members of the State House and half of the 50 members of the State Senate are eligible for re-election this fall. The Republicans who control both chambers, with the support of industry, generally resisted the democrat Administration of wolves efforts to limit emissions.

But a majority (56%) of the 1,200 voters likely to have responded to the poll agreed with the assumption that “rules to reduce pollution from oil and gas will create new jobs in manufacturing and in the field to inspect and repair leaks”.

Independent voters joined Democrats in accepting that premise — especially in suburban Philadelphia that’s less impacted by oil and gas exploration, but whose eco-friendly, predominantly blue voters tend to show up in favor. force during election years. Notably, however, voters in the Pittsburgh area, which is ground zero for natural gas exploration, also support this thesis, the poll showed.

The poll “shows very clearly that voters recognize the importance of tackling climate change and would be more likely to vote for elected officials who will actually take action.” Mandy Warnerthe Pennsylvania Director for EDF action, said in a statement. “A substantial majority of Pennsylvania voters support the carbon and methane emissions proposals and are eager to support the candidate who favors climate action.”

(Source: Global Strategy Group survey)

With a mid-term environment generally unfavorable to them, the poll is a dose of good news for Pennsylvania Democrats seeking to topple the State House and clinch seats in the state Senate.

Just over two months after Election Day, the state’s wildcard ballot for the General Assembly is tied at 46% each for Democrats and Republicans, according to pollsters.

A generic Democrat who supports carbon limits gets a 10-point bounce (51-41%) over a Republican who opposes them; while a generic Democrat who supports reducing methane emissions from oil and gas exploration gets an 8-point bounce (50-42%) over a Republican who opposes it, according to the poll.

In the much-watched gubernatorial race, the Democrat Josh Shapirocurrent state attorney general, leads the Republican Party Doug Mastriano, a state senator, 50-42 percent. And in the fight for the Democratic US Senate Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman directs a famous republican doctor Mehmet Oz 49-37 percent.

“Pennsylvanians support clean air and climate action and seek leaders who will make progress on these issues,” Jackson Morristhe main adviser for the NRDC Action Fund, said in a statement. “Candidates who support efforts to reduce dangerous carbon and methane pollution will be rightly rewarded for prioritizing the health of our citizens and communities over the profits of big industry polluters. .”

The poll, conducted July 14-19, had a margin of error of 2.9%.

Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano (City & State photo by Justin Sweitzer).

Our things.
Republican candidate for governor by Doug Mastriano education finance plan would devastate public schools in Pennsylvaniasay the defenders. Stone Room to the story.

Florida Jewish and Democratic leaders urged Sunshine State Governor Ron DeSantis to cancel his Friday appearance in Pittsburgh where he must campaign for Mastriano, Stone Room also reports.

Federal public health officials said Thursday they were work with national and local health departments to boost messaging and vaccinations for those most at risk of contracting monkeypox, including at large-scale events. Jennifer Shutt, Washington Capital-Star reporter and Cassie Miller have the story.

Ancient U.S. Senator Rick Santorum, R-Pa., was about to storm the Iowa State Fair Thursday to build support for a constitutional convention, Robin Opsahl, from our sister site, reports the Iowa Capital Dispatch.

In the Estrella-Capital: The State Functionaries Alientan to the Residents of Pensilvania to serve as electoral workers before the November elections. Veinte estados, incluyendo a Pensilvania, join the opposition of Texas’ request for emergency abortion care.

On our comments page this morning: New Federal Law Providing Health Care for Burning Hearth Victims puts an end to a decades-old injusticea Virginia Tech scholar writes. And the agri-titans fusion Sanderson Farms and Cargill is a bad deal for farmers and consumerslawyer Tim Gibbons written in an op-ed first published by our sister site, the Missouri Independent.

Monkeypox virus, illustration (Getty Images)

Somewhere else.
Black residents of Philadelphia are at higher risk for monkeypox, but do not have equal access to vaccinesthe Applicant reports.

The Post-Gazette features today’s Steel City rally for the Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano, with Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

A federal judge blocked DeSantis’ “Stop-WOKE” law dealing with workplace training around race, finding its policies “bordering on unintelligible” and in violation of the First Amendment, Politics reports. DeSantis is sure to please, notes the news agency.

A new announcement from the Democratic gubernatorial candidate Josh Shapiro complaints Mastriano hired ‘alt-right extremists’ after a payment on the right social media site Gabthe Bucks County Mail Schedules reports (via GoErie).

Mastriano declined an invitation to debate of LancasterOnlinecalling its staff “left hacks”, PolicyAP reports.

Asset loyalist steve bannon called Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate John Fetterman ‘Satanic,’ PennLive reports. It’s going about as well as one might expect.

by Fettermann Republican Rival, Mehmet Oz, barn in luzerne county Thursday. The Voice of citizens has the details (paywall).

New internal polls show tight race for Northeastern Pennsylvania’s 8th congressional district, where the incumbent Democrat U.S. Representative Matt Cartwright faces a rematch with the Republican Jim Bognet, City and State Pa. reports.

The FBI has issued subpoenas to several Pennsylvania lawmakers – the reasons are still unclear, WITF-FM reports.

Lancaster County Prison Commission rejected a proposal to embezzle less money inmate purchases from the county general fund, LancasterOnline reports.

morning call five things to know on the future of passenger rail transport in the Lehigh Valley.

Philadelphia launched a new tool to connect residents with free and low-cost healthcare providers, WHY-FM reports.

Here’s your #Pennsylvania Instagram for the day:

What is happening
10:30 a.m.: Visit by State Department of Education officials Harrisburg Area Community College to tout higher education in this year’s state budget.

What’s Going On (Naked Political Edition)
Republican candidate for governor Doug Mastriano hosts a reception at 4 p.m. (presumably in Pittsburgh – you need to RSVP to find out). Admission costs $2,500 and $10,000. House Minority Leader Joanna McClinton, D-Philadelphiahosts a reception at 5:00 p.m. Bartram’s Garden in Philadelphia. Admission costs $75 to $5,000. and state Rep. Regina Young, D-Philadelphiahosts a reception at 5:30 p.m. ROAR in Philadelphia. Admission there costs between $50 and $1,000.

WolfWatch
At the time of this writing, Governor Tom Wolf has no public schedule today.

You say it’s your birthday department
Speaking of Joanna McClinton: Birthday wishes go out to the Democratic leader this morning as she takes another trip around the sun. Congratulations.

heavy spinning
We will be going out this week with one of Death Taxi for Cutie. Here is ‘Here forever.’

Free Friday Football Link
It’s Friday, and that means The Guardian has his list of top 10 things to watch in the round this weekend premier league stock. Notably, Arsenal will look for his third straight win as he faces a newly promoted Bournemouth Saturday.

And now you are up to date.

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Baby boomers are more aware of environmental issues and more involved in climate action: study and more Latest News Here https://eco-label-tourism.com/baby-boomers-are-more-aware-of-environmental-issues-and-more-involved-in-climate-action-study-and-more-latest-news-here/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 15:28:51 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/baby-boomers-are-more-aware-of-environmental-issues-and-more-involved-in-climate-action-study-and-more-latest-news-here/ HEALTH, COST AND CONVENIENCE KEY DRIVERS OF CHANGE The second OCBC Climate Index found that the majority of Singaporeans are still not adopting many sustainable behaviors. Respondents who adopt sustainable behaviors are typically motivated by personal practical benefits, such as health, cost and convenience, not the environment, the OCBC said. Although 47% of respondents indicate […]]]>

HEALTH, COST AND CONVENIENCE KEY DRIVERS OF CHANGE

The second OCBC Climate Index found that the majority of Singaporeans are still not adopting many sustainable behaviors.

Respondents who adopt sustainable behaviors are typically motivated by personal practical benefits, such as health, cost and convenience, not the environment, the OCBC said.

Although 47% of respondents indicate that they want to live a sustainable life for a greener future, more are adopting carbon-intensive behaviors, such as using air conditioning as their primary mode of cooling their homes and purchase of new non-essential items. more than once a month, compared to 2021.

Those who don’t engage in carbon-intensive behaviors “are not necessarily adopting climate action for environmental reasons,” the OCBC said.

“Rather, the reasons for their choices are personal and include a desire for better health, saving money, and personal comfort.”

These motivations lead people to walk, cycle or take public transport instead of driving, to buy second-hand furniture and to participate in “urban agriculture” initiatives, he noted. ‘OCBC.

The national average score for 2022 of 6.7 was unchanged from 2021.

This year, having better health and having a cleaner, greener environment were the two reasons respondents wanted to live a sustainable life, at 47%.

Cost and inconvenience were cited as the main barriers to sustainable living.

“Thus, desires to want a more sustainable world have not tipped the index score this year, as personal practical reasons continue to motivate concrete actions,” OCBC said.

Although the overall score remained the same as last year, Ms. Koh Ching Ching, Head of Group Branding and Communications at OCBC Bank, noted that this year’s survey results showed that more Singaporeans wanted to create a more sustainable world, but that it was difficult to make real change. when it’s expensive or impractical.

Ms. Jessica Cheam, Founder and Managing Director of Eco-Business, also noted that while the results may be discouraging at first glance, there are “bright spots” in the results that indicate improvements, such as in the choice of transport or in the adoption of re-commerce.

In its inaugural edition, the OCBC Climate Index in 2020 found that high awareness of environmental issues did not reflect adoption of green practices.

Baby boomers are more aware of environmental issues and more involved in climate action: study and latest news

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Gen Zer Tracks Baby Boomers in Sustainability Awareness and Climate Action: Study https://eco-label-tourism.com/gen-zer-tracks-baby-boomers-in-sustainability-awareness-and-climate-action-study/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 13:35:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/gen-zer-tracks-baby-boomers-in-sustainability-awareness-and-climate-action-study/ HEALTH, COST AND CONVENIENCE KEY DRIVERS OF CHANGE The second OCBC Climate Index found that the majority of Singaporeans are still not adopting many sustainable behaviors. Respondents who adopt sustainable behaviors are typically motivated by personal practical benefits, such as health, cost and convenience, not the environment, OCBC said. Although 47% of respondents indicate they […]]]>

HEALTH, COST AND CONVENIENCE KEY DRIVERS OF CHANGE

The second OCBC Climate Index found that the majority of Singaporeans are still not adopting many sustainable behaviors.

Respondents who adopt sustainable behaviors are typically motivated by personal practical benefits, such as health, cost and convenience, not the environment, OCBC said.

Although 47% of respondents indicate they want to live a sustainable life for a greener future, more are adopting carbon-intensive behaviors, such as using air conditioning as their primary mode of cooling their homes and purchase of new non-essential items. more than once a month, compared to 2021.

Those who don’t engage in carbon-intensive behaviors “are not necessarily adopting climate action for environmental reasons,” the OCBC said.

“Rather, the reasons for their choices are personal and include a desire for better health, saving money, and personal comfort.”

These motivations lead people to walk, cycle or take public transport instead of driving, buy second-hand furniture and participate in “urban agriculture” initiatives, he noted. ‘OCBC.

The national average score for 2022 of 6.7 was unchanged from 2021.

This year, having better health and having a cleaner, greener environment were the two reasons respondents wanted to live a sustainable life, at 47%.

Cost and inconvenience were cited as the main barriers to sustainable living.

“Thus, desires for a more sustainable world did not tip the index score this year, as personal practical reasons continue to drive real action,” OCBC said.

Although the overall score remained the same as last year, Ms. Koh Ching Ching, Head of Group Branding and Communications at OCBC Bank, noted that this year’s survey results showed that more Singaporeans wanted to create a more sustainable world, but real change was difficult. when it’s expensive or impractical.

Ms. Jessica Cheam, Founder and Managing Director of Eco-Business, also noted that while the results may be discouraging at first glance, there are “bright spots” in the results that indicate improvements, such as in the choice of transport or in the adoption of re-commerce.

In its inaugural edition, the OCBC Climate Index in 2020 found that high awareness of environmental issues did not reflect adoption of green practices.

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