Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 17:00:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Penn State Extension Relaunches Community Leadership Around Environmental Issues | New https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-relaunches-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues-new/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-relaunches-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues-new/ UNIVERSITY PARK – Twenty-six volunteers from four counties signed up for the pilot. Led by educators from Extension’s Leadership and Community Vitality team, participants learned about leadership styles, team development, working with local leaders and dealing with conflict. What prevents people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK – Twenty-six volunteers from four counties signed up for the pilot. Led by educators from Extension’s Leadership and Community Vitality team, participants learned about leadership styles, team development, working with local leaders and dealing with conflict.

What prevents people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action to fight climate change? These questions seized a team of Penn State Extension educators and master gardeners, who set out to find answers.

They started out by securing a Science to Practice Extension grant from the College of Agricultural Sciences office for research and higher education. These grants provide up to $ 10,000 per year to integrated research and extension teams to address pressing and complex challenges.

“Our premise was that people don’t run projects because they don’t feel like they have leadership skills and they don’t know how to get the money,” said Linda Falcone, a Entrepreneurial, Economic and Community Development Educator based in Wyoming County.

To test this theory, Suzanna Windon, an assistant professor of youth and adult leadership at the college, interviewed more than a thousand master gardeners and master watershed stewards about their volunteering habits.

The survey revealed that the volunteers did indeed perceive weaknesses in educating others, writing grants, raising funds for projects and communicating with local governments. These results guided the training topics for a pilot leadership program. What touched participants the most was the grant writing course, where they learned how to measure impact and how to prepare a proposal.

Participants then worked in county-based teams to draft grant proposals for local projects dealing with environmental issues. They described their projects, explained the potential impacts of the project and prepared a budget. After evaluating and comparing the proposals, extension educators allocated Science-to-Practice grant funds to each team.

“That’s what makes this program unique,” ​​Falcone said. “It took the risk of writing a grant and not getting funded because we already did it for them.”

Competing for a portion of the grant money created healthy competition among the participants. The extension team provided comments on the proposals and projects; they wanted participants to practice and improve their grant writing skills.

Fostering independence was a primary goal, explained Falcone. The skills acquired through the leadership program will enable participants to fundraise and initiate community projects on their own.

The county-based teams partnered with local leaders to bring their projects to fruition. A team cleaned up an overgrown garden in a state park and planted pollinator-friendly plants to rejuvenate the garden. Another team created a rain garden around a pavilion in a new waterfront municipal park. The rain garden captures the overflow water that rushes down the hills – with the aim of reducing water pollution in the Susquehanna River.

A third team conducted soil health testing experiments and offered training and soil testing kits to community members. Introducing home gardeners to these techniques could increase the nutrient level in their soil and reduce the use of synthetic fertilizers.

The fourth team partnered with a group of community volunteers to educate residents about native plants and distribute plants to low-income homeowners.

Teaching others about environmental issues was crucial, according to Falcone. “The purpose of Master Gardeners is to educate others on why the environment is so important and how they can help,” she said.

Additionally, the county-based teams gathered letters of recognition from the community and created impact statements to use for future education and publicity.

In a post-program survey, more than half of participants said they were more likely to lead a community project in the future, and 86% said it improved their leadership skills.

Efforts are underway to expand the program statewide. A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will fund a pilot youth program in 2022. Aimed at youth ages 13 to 18, the program will take place in five locations and consist of two Master Watershed Steward projects and three Master Gardener projects.

“We need the next generation to not only be aware of environmental issues, but also to take action to address them,” Falcone said.

Falcone and the team are hoping to secure a second DEP scholarship for another adult program.

Lori Voll-Wallace, Master Gardener Zone Coordinator based in Susquehanna County, highlighted an important point regarding the upcoming training: “This is open to everyone, not just master gardeners or master stewards of watersheds. She said. “We hope to motivate people to volunteer and make a difference in their local communities. “


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Council tackles environmental issues for series of discussions on status report | Culture & Society https://eco-label-tourism.com/council-tackles-environmental-issues-for-series-of-discussions-on-status-report-culture-society/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 09:29:08 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/council-tackles-environmental-issues-for-series-of-discussions-on-status-report-culture-society/ Ammon news – The Economic and Social Council on Tuesday addressed the environmental aspect as part of the state of the country report, as part of a series of sessions to discuss the report with a group of experts from the public and public sectors. private. After a briefing on the key points of the […]]]>

Ammon news – The Economic and Social Council on Tuesday addressed the environmental aspect as part of the state of the country report, as part of a series of sessions to discuss the report with a group of experts from the public and public sectors. private.

After a briefing on the key points of the report, Environment Minister Muawieh Radaideh said the recommendations from the environmental angle of the state of the country report will be reviewed and addressed, adding that Jordan is working with the global system. relevant to moving towards a green economy, as the world struggles to address the challenges of climate change and its impact on the environment sector.

He stressed the importance of setting and meeting targets to help countries cope with environmental challenges, noting that the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly evident in the Middle East.

He stressed the importance of linking the environmental aspect with economic and societal aspects to achieve sustainable development, in addition to networking between the water, energy and food sectors to achieve food and environmental security.

The Secretary General of the Council Mitri Madanat underlined the importance of the green economy, vital for the preservation of biodiversity. The main challenges facing the environment sector, he noted, include climate change, increasing population growth and changing consumption patterns.

At the same time, Secretary General of the Ministry of Environment Muhammad Khashashna stressed the importance of the general framework law for waste management and efforts to restructure the environment sector, which includes organizations of the civil society, universities and government entities.

The Council’s financial policy coordinator, Ziad Dardakah, presented the main weaknesses and strengths of the environmental sector, such as the reduced budget of the Ministry of the Environment.

During the panel discussion, participants stressed the importance of infrastructure rehabilitation, focusing on the green economy, and cooperation between the public and private and environmental sectors to implement plans and strategies .

They also stressed the importance of raising awareness of the seriousness of environmental challenges and their repercussions, as well as developing a roadmap with stakeholder participation to reduce the risks facing the sector.

They stressed the need to shift to sustainable transport to reduce the effects of climate change and the optimal use of resources in several sectors, in addition to supporting scientific studies on reducing the carbon footprint to avoid the mismanagement of projects.

Over the next few weeks, the council will hold discussion sessions that will bring together experts and stakeholders from the sectors and fields of macroeconomics, infrastructure, human resources, community development (1) and community development (2), in particular. more to discuss policy development and public sector development.


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Penn State Extension revives community leadership around environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-revives-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 22:17:22 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-revives-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues/ UNIVERSITY PARK, PA – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action to fight climate change? These questions seized a team of Pennsylvania State Extension educators and Master Gardeners, who began to search for answers. They started by getting a Science-to-practice grant Extension and College of […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action to fight climate change? These questions seized a team of Pennsylvania State Extension educators and Master Gardeners, who began to search for answers.

They started by getting a Science-to-practice grant Extension and College of Agricultural Sciences Office of Research and Higher Education. These grants provide up to $ 10,000 per year to integrated research and extension teams to address pressing and complex challenges.

“Our premise was that people don’t run projects because they don’t feel like they have leadership skills and they don’t know how to get the money,” said Linda Falcone, a Entrepreneurial, Economic and Community Development Educator based in Wyoming County.

To test this theory, Suzanna Windon, an assistant professor of youth and adult leadership at the college, interviewed more than a thousand master gardeners and Master steward of the watershed volunteers about their volunteering habits. The survey found that the volunteers did indeed perceive weaknesses in educating others, writing grants, raising funds for projects and communicating with local government. These results guided the training topics for a pilot leadership program.

Twenty-six volunteers from four counties signed up for the pilot project. Led by educators from Extension’s Leadership and Community Vitality team, participants learned about leadership styles, team development, working with local leaders and dealing with conflict. What touched participants the most was the grant writing course, where they learned how to measure impact and how to prepare a proposal.

Participants then worked in county-based teams to draft grant proposals for local projects dealing with environmental issues. They described their projects, explained the potential impacts of the project and prepared a budget. After evaluating and comparing the proposals, extension educators allocated Science-to-Practice grant funds to each team.

“That’s what makes this program unique,” ​​Falcone said. “It took the risk of writing a grant and not being funded, because we already did it for them [with the Science-to-Practice grant]. “

Competing for a portion of the grant money created healthy competition among the participants. The extension team provided comments on the proposals and projects; they wanted participants to practice and improve their grant writing skills.

Fostering independence was a primary goal, explained Falcone. The skills acquired through the leadership program will enable participants to fundraise and initiate community projects on their own.

The county-based teams partnered with local leaders to bring their projects to fruition. A team cleaned up an overgrown garden in a state park and planted pollinator-friendly plants to rejuvenate the garden. Another team created a rain garden around a pavilion in a new waterfront municipal park. The rain garden captures the overflow water that rushes down the hills – with the aim of reducing water pollution in the Susquehanna River.

A third team conducted soil health testing experiments and offered training and soil testing kits to community members. Introducing home gardeners to these techniques could increase the nutrient level in their soil and reduce the use of synthetic fertilizers.

The fourth team partnered with a group of community volunteers to educate residents about native plants and distribute plants to low-income homeowners.

Teaching others about environmental issues was crucial, according to Falcone.

“The purpose of Master Gardeners is to educate others on why the environment is so important and how they can help,” she said.

Additionally, the county-based teams gathered letters of recognition from the community and created impact statements to use for future education and publicity.

In a post-program survey, more than half of participants said they were more likely to lead a community project in the future, and 86% said it improved their leadership skills.

Melissa Wright participated in the Soil Health Project in Wyoming County. She found the hands-on learning activities interesting and informative. As the Master Gardeners coordinator, Wright observed that the Master Gardeners volunteers undergo basic training with a lot of knowledge to share. This course helped translate this knowledge into community awareness.

Efforts are underway to expand the program statewide. A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will fund a pilot youth program in 2022. Aimed at youth ages 13 to 18, the program will take place in five locations and consist of two Master Watershed Steward projects and three Master Gardener projects.

“We need the next generation to not only be aware of environmental issues, but also to take action to address them,” Falcone said.

Falcone and the team are hoping to secure a second DEP scholarship for another adult program.

Lori Voll-Wallace, Master Gardener Zone Coordinator based in Susquehanna County, highlighted an important point regarding upcoming trainings: “This is open to everyone, not just master gardeners or master stewards of watersheds. She said. “We hope to motivate people to volunteer and make a difference in their local communities. “


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Penn State Extension revives community leadership around environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-revives-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues-2/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-revives-community-leadership-around-environmental-issues-2/ UNIVERSITY PARK, PA – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action to fight climate change? These questions seized a team of Pennsylvania State Extension educators and Master Gardeners, who began to search for answers. They started by getting a Science-to-practice grant Extension and College of […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can we encourage volunteers to take action to fight climate change? These questions seized a team of Pennsylvania State Extension educators and Master Gardeners, who began to search for answers.

They started by getting a Science-to-practice grant Extension and College of Agricultural Sciences Office of Research and Higher Education. These grants provide up to $ 10,000 per year to integrated research and extension teams to address pressing and complex challenges.

“Our premise was that people don’t run projects because they don’t feel like they have leadership skills and they don’t know how to get the money,” said Linda Falcone, a Entrepreneurship, economic and community development educator based in Wyoming County.

To test this theory, Suzanna Windon, an assistant professor of youth and adult leadership at the college, interviewed more than a thousand master gardeners and Master steward of the watershed volunteers about their volunteering habits. The survey found that the volunteers did indeed perceive weaknesses in educating others, writing grants, raising funds for projects and communicating with local government. These results guided the training topics for a pilot leadership program.

Twenty-six volunteers from four counties signed up for the pilot project. Led by educators from Extension’s Leadership and Community Vitality team, participants learned about leadership styles, team development, working with local leaders and dealing with conflict. What touched participants the most was the grant writing course, where they learned how to measure impact and how to prepare a proposal.

Participants then worked in county-based teams to draft grant proposals for local projects dealing with environmental issues. They described their projects, explained the potential impacts of the project and prepared a budget. After evaluating and comparing the proposals, extension educators allocated Science-to-Practice grant funds to each team.

“That’s what makes this program unique,” ​​Falcone said. “It took the risk of writing a grant and not being funded, because we already did it for them [with the Science-to-Practice grant]. “

Competing for a portion of the grant money created healthy competition among the participants. The extension team provided comments on the proposals and projects; they wanted participants to practice and improve their grant writing skills.

Fostering independence was a primary goal, explained Falcone. The skills acquired through the leadership program will enable participants to raise funds and initiate community projects on their own.

The county-based teams partnered with local leaders to bring their projects to fruition. A team cleaned up an overgrown garden in a state park and planted pollinator-friendly plants to rejuvenate the garden. Another team created a rain garden around a pavilion in a new waterfront municipal park. The rain garden captures the overflow water that rushes down the hills – with the aim of reducing water pollution in the Susquehanna River.

A third team conducted soil health testing experiments and offered training and soil testing kits to community members. Introducing home gardeners to these techniques could increase the nutrient level in their soil and reduce the use of synthetic fertilizers.

The fourth team partnered with a group of community volunteers to educate residents about native plants and distribute plants to low-income homeowners.

Teaching others about environmental issues was crucial, according to Falcone.

“The purpose of Master Gardeners is to educate others about why the environment is so important and how they can help,” she said.

Additionally, county-based teams gathered letters of recognition from the community and created impact statements to use for future education and publicity.

In a post-program survey, more than half of participants said they were more likely to lead a community project in the future, and 86% said it improved their leadership skills.

Melissa Wright participated in the Soil Health Project in Wyoming County. She found the hands-on learning activities interesting and informative. As the Master Gardeners coordinator, Wright observed that the Master Gardeners volunteers undergo basic training with a lot of knowledge to share. This course helped translate this knowledge into community awareness.

Efforts are underway to expand the program statewide. A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will fund a pilot youth program in 2022. Aimed at youth ages 13 to 18, the program will take place in five locations and consist of two Master Watershed Steward projects and three Master Gardener projects.

“We need the next generation to not only be aware of environmental issues, but also to take action to address them,” Falcone said.

Falcone and the team are hoping to secure a second DEP scholarship for another adult program.

Lori Voll-Wallace, Master Gardener Zone Coordinator based in Susquehanna County, highlighted an important point regarding upcoming trainings: “This is open to everyone, not just master gardeners or master stewards of watersheds. She said. “We hope to motivate people to volunteer and make a difference in their local communities. “


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At COP26, attention turns to Iran’s environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/at-cop26-attention-turns-to-irans-environmental-issues/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 12:11:16 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/at-cop26-attention-turns-to-irans-environmental-issues/ As the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) reached its final day, discussions about the growing number of storms, floods and wildfires around the world featured prominently in the debate. agenda. The impacts of climate change are devastating, affecting the lives of tens of millions of people every year. There are several advances in tackling […]]]>

As the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) reached its final day, discussions about the growing number of storms, floods and wildfires around the world featured prominently in the debate. agenda. The impacts of climate change are devastating, affecting the lives of tens of millions of people every year.

There are several advances in tackling climate change that lead to cleaner air and the restoration of nature, but it is a slow process. If the countries of the world join forces to help each other, the sooner we can see bigger improvements.

Iran is a disaster prone country due to both its geological and climatic situation, facing both floods and drought. The variation of these pressures reflects the great diversity of the climatic and geophysical zones of the country.

Massive deforestation, deterioration of ecosystems and rapid desertification of agricultural land are putting significant pressure on the Iranian environment. Disaster planning is greatly needed to overcome the impacts of natural disasters in the country, as well as a reduction in actions causing deforestation and desertification. An important task is to provide education and training to all citizens to help them better respond to natural disasters. As Iran is prone to relatively frequent earthquakes, there is a need to improve the research and monitoring of these events to enable better earthquake forecasting technology, as well as to improve and implement earthquake-resistant building regulations throughout the country.

Population density and its distribution is a major stressor with transport, mainly in urban areas, as well as issues such as age of vehicles, number and fuel consumption.

With so many people crowded into cities, there is a great strain on resources. The effects of such urbanization include poor air quality, light pollution, noise, encroachment on green spaces and excessive pressure on waste disposal and recycling. The worse the conditions, it can lead to serious public health and sanitation problems. With the majority of Iran’s landmass mountainous and environmental problems causing rapid desertification, remaining arable land is scarce at best, so cities have seen a massive influx of people migrating to them.

Despite promises of reform, human rights violations are still “rife” in Iran. Among the targeted groups are environmental activists, with more than 60 activists and researchers arrested in 2018.

Widespread unrest across Iran has built up in recent years, with environmental issues facing citizens as one of the root causes, the other issues being severe economic decline and dominance of the regime as a whole.

The most serious environmental problem facing Iran today is drought. However, this is not a natural situation. The severe water shortage was created by the Iranian government due to plans to build dams by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), as well as the regime’s institutionalized corruption and mismanagement of water resources. already rare.

This crisis has led to the abandonment of thousands of villages as the land becomes unsustainable. Predictions suggest that millions of people will eventually be displaced as the problems worsen.

Natural climate variability, climate change, droughts and economic sanctions have had undeniable impacts on Iran’s environment and its water resources. Yet Iran’s environmental and water problems are mostly man-made, the product of decades of absolutely poor management coupled with a lack of forethought, uncoordinated planning and a misperception of development.


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Enactment of the Law on Investment in Infrastructure and Employment: Energy, Water and Environment Issues Addressed | Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, PLLC https://eco-label-tourism.com/enactment-of-the-law-on-investment-in-infrastructure-and-employment-energy-water-and-environment-issues-addressed-mitchell-williams-selig-gates-woodyard-pllc/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/enactment-of-the-law-on-investment-in-infrastructure-and-employment-energy-water-and-environment-issues-addressed-mitchell-williams-selig-gates-woodyard-pllc/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 19:19:56 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/enactment-of-the-law-on-investment-in-infrastructure-and-employment-energy-water-and-environment-issues-addressed-mitchell-williams-selig-gates-woodyard-pllc/ Download PDF President Biden is expected to sign the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (“Act”) this week. An important part of the law addresses a number of issues related to energy, water and the environment. Examples include: Subsurface injection control grants (50 million) Decarbonize the school bus fleet (5 billion) Carbon Use Subsidy Program (310 […]]]>

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Eco Health Cluster Solves Environmental Problems and Fosters Collaboration | New https://eco-label-tourism.com/eco-health-cluster-solves-environmental-problems-and-fosters-collaboration-new/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/eco-health-cluster-solves-environmental-problems-and-fosters-collaboration-new/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 21:35:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/eco-health-cluster-solves-environmental-problems-and-fosters-collaboration-new/ Texas Tech is researching the effects of climate change on various ecosystems through the Eco Health Cluster of the Department of Biology. The Eco Health Cluster is an on-campus group led by faculty members from the Biology Department, including Nick Smith, Natasja van Gestel, and Dylan Schwilk, who help students study different facets of climate […]]]>

Texas Tech is researching the effects of climate change on various ecosystems through the Eco Health Cluster of the Department of Biology.

The Eco Health Cluster is an on-campus group led by faculty members from the Biology Department, including Nick Smith, Natasja van Gestel, and Dylan Schwilk, who help students study different facets of climate change.

Cluster members are generally interested in the impact of environmental changes on ecosystems over space and time, Smith said.

“It can be things like abiotic conditions like temperature and precipitation, and atmospheric conditions, but also things like what humans do to the environment,” Smith said.

Much of the research is heavily based in the American Southwest, but research is also underway closer to Tech, Smith said. There are field sites in and around Lubbock with work underway at the Department of Natural Resource Management, which maintains native rangelands where field experiments are being set up.

There is also work in the region’s farming systems as Eco Health group partners with those of the USDA, but also with local farmers, Smith said.

“Much of our research is focused on global change,” said Evan Perkowski, teaching assistant in biological sciences. “We have a group that focuses on, like, the ecology of fire. (And) our group is focused on finding a good physiology, an outdated synthesis, an answer to different, you know, global change scenarios, and then on the guests of the event, these labs come together. focus on what’s going on under the ground, so different, you know, microorganisms, bacteria, fungi and how those might spread to have an impact, for example, like farming practices and stuff like that.

The work done in the labs brings several benefits, helping the environment and teaching students at the same time, Perkowski said.

Smith said one benefit of the group’s collaboration is that everyone has access to resources and knowledge they might not have had before, as well as helping postdoctoral fellows and fellow students. .

“They can interact with each other more than they normally would, which is pretty great for collaboration and idea development,” Smith said.

Azaj Mahmud, a teaching assistant in the biological sciences, said the group continues to grow and the group is trying to achieve many goals.

“One of the biggest goals is to foster that sense of collaboration, but also just a sense of community,” said Mahmud. of our post-docs an opportunity to mentor undergraduates, right? “

This growing group not only helps teach how environmental changes impact ecosystems, Perkowski said, but also gives students a chance to gain hands-on experience for future projects.

“We strive to make this space a truly inclusive space that anyone can join in,” said Perkowski. “If there are any undergraduates who wish to join our lab group, they are always welcome to contact Nick, Dylan or Natasha, and we would be more than happy to have them. “


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Environmental issues will be addressed by the U of Haifa and Zayed U through a memorandum of understanding https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-will-be-addressed-by-the-u-of-haifa-and-zayed-u-through-a-memorandum-of-understanding/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-will-be-addressed-by-the-u-of-haifa-and-zayed-u-through-a-memorandum-of-understanding/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 11:47:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-will-be-addressed-by-the-u-of-haifa-and-zayed-u-through-a-memorandum-of-understanding/ The Israeli University of Haifa and the Zayed University of the United Arab Emirates have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to work together on environmental issues with joint research between faculty and students of the institutions. The agreement was signed in a virtual ceremony on Wednesday by the president of the University of […]]]>
The Israeli University of Haifa and the Zayed University of the United Arab Emirates have signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to work together on environmental issues with joint research between faculty and students of the institutions.

The agreement was signed in a virtual ceremony on Wednesday by the president of the University of Haifa, Professor Ron Robin and the Minister of Culture and Youth of the United Arab Emirates, Noura bint Mohammed Al Kaabi, in the presence the Ambassador of Israel to the United Arab Emirates Amir Hayek and the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to Israel Mohamed Mahmoud Al Khaja.

This new cooperation agreement will see joint research in a variety of fields, including natural resource management, education and marine sciences, and will also conduct exchange programs for conferences, workshops and seminars.

“As a result of the many common challenges humanity faces as we tackle the climate crisis, this kind of academic cooperation is a way to preserve what we all call at home – the planet,” Robin said during ceremony.

This partnership “will create cross-border opportunities for students, faculty and the region as a whole,” Al Kaabi said. “Together, we can lead innovation in food and water security, marine science and environmental sustainability.”

The President of the University of Haifa, Professor Ron Robin, presents the University’s Memorandum of Understanding with Zayed University of the United Arab Emirates. (credit: UNIVERSITY OF HAIFA)

The signing, which precedes the 50th anniversary of the University of Haifa and following the 50th anniversary of Zayed University, is the latest academic cooperation agreement signed by Israeli and Emirati institutions following the normalization of relations between the two. countries in 2020 thanks to the Abrahamic accords.


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UAE-Israeli universities sign MoU on environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/uae-israeli-universities-sign-mou-on-environmental-issues/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/uae-israeli-universities-sign-mou-on-environmental-issues/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 12:41:36 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/uae-israeli-universities-sign-mou-on-environmental-issues/ that of Israel Haifa University signed an academic cooperation agreement with Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates, which will focus on environmental issues and spearhead joint research between faculty and students. The MOU will promote information sharing and joint research projects across various disciplines that include, but not limited to, marine sciences, education and […]]]>

that of Israel Haifa University signed an academic cooperation agreement with Zayed University in the United Arab Emirates, which will focus on environmental issues and spearhead joint research between faculty and students.

The MOU will promote information sharing and joint research projects across various disciplines that include, but not limited to, marine sciences, education and natural resource management, said the University of Haifa in a statement. In addition, universities will organize student and faculty exchange programs for seminars, conferences and workshops.

In a virtual ceremony on Wednesday, UAE Minister of Culture and Youth Noura bint Mohammed Al Kaabi and University of Haifa President Professor Ron Robin signed the ‘OK. The Ambassador of Israel to the United Arab Emirates, Amir Hayek, and the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to Israel, Mohamed Mahmoud Al Khaja, were also present.

“As a result of the many common challenges humanity faces as we tackle the climate crisis, this kind of academic cooperation is a way to preserve what we all call at home – the planet,” said President Robin when signing.

Minister Al Kaabi agreed, saying this partnership “will create cross-border opportunities for students, faculty and the region as a whole. Together, we can lead innovation in food and water security, marine science and environmental sustainability. “

Haifa University’s vice president for international affairs and sustainability Baruch Marzen and director of government, community and external relations Hila Elroy were also present at the signing. The Zayed University provost and Professor Clayton MacKenzie, Director of Studies and Research Assistant Professor Michael Allen, were on hand to represent the Emirati side.

Professor Robin, who as vice-chancellor at New York University was responsible for establishing its international campus in Abu Dhabi in 2010, began his remarks with greetings in Arabic and then said the agreement is important to him both professionally and personally. He also congratulated Zayed University on its 50th anniversary and added that the University of Haifa is also expected to celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2022.


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Azerbaijan holds regular meeting of Working Group on Environmental Issues in Liberated Lands https://eco-label-tourism.com/azerbaijan-holds-regular-meeting-of-working-group-on-environmental-issues-in-liberated-lands/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/azerbaijan-holds-regular-meeting-of-working-group-on-environmental-issues-in-liberated-lands/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 13:38:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/azerbaijan-holds-regular-meeting-of-working-group-on-environmental-issues-in-liberated-lands/ October 29, 2021 17:38 (UTC + 04: 00) 254 Through Tendency A regular meeting of the Working Group on Environmental Issues of the Interdepartmental Center under the Headquarters of the Coordination, established for the centralized solution of the problems in the liberated territories of Azerbaijan, was held, Tendency reports Oct. 29. According to information, the […]]]>

October 29, 2021 17:38 (UTC + 04: 00)

254

Through Tendency

A regular meeting of the Working Group on Environmental Issues of the Interdepartmental Center under the Headquarters of the Coordination, established for the centralized solution of the problems in the liberated territories of Azerbaijan, was held, Tendency reports Oct. 29.

According to information, the meeting brought together representatives of the President of Azerbaijan in Shusha and the part of Aghdam district freed from occupation, including the city of Aghdam, the ministries of ecology and resources. natural resources, agriculture, water improvement and management. OJSC and other state structures.

It is reported that in order to assess the environmental situation in accordance with the “Action Plan for the Solution of Military-Political, Socio-economic, Humanitarian, Organizational and Other Urgent Problems in the Liberated Territories of Azerbaijan”, members of the working group were informed of the comprehensive monitoring carried out in the liberated territories, including for the control of pollution of transboundary watercourses.

It was noted during the meeting that the preparation of a plan – an extension program of monitoring carried out on the Okhchuchay river, which is still polluted by Armenia, including carrying out biomonitoring, identification indicators sensitive to heavy metals, the attraction of scientific institutions to relevant research – has started.

The meeting also discussed issues arising from the decree of the President of Azerbaijan “On measures to organize activities of Basitchay State Nature Reserve”, protected natural areas, natural complexes and unique objects.

It was also noted that the tree planting events, which are organized annually by the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources, will this time be organized on a large scale in Karabakh and East Zanguezur in accordance with the objectives. improvement of the environment of the liberated territories.

In addition, the members of the working group were informed of the challenges of environmental protection during the implementation of road infrastructure construction projects and transport in the liberated territories, a preliminary assessment of forest resources on these land using satellite imagery.

The working group on environmental issues works in close coordination and exchanges information with the other working groups of the Interdepartmental Center.

The coordination headquarters, created by decree of the President of Azerbaijan on November 24, 2020, is headed by the head of the presidential administration Samir Nouriyev.

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