Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:01:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental issues – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Yamaha Motor Establishes Sustainable Development Investment Fund — Accelerating Efforts to Solve Environmental Problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/yamaha-motor-establishes-sustainable-development-investment-fund-accelerating-efforts-to-solve-environmental-problems/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:01:41 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/yamaha-motor-establishes-sustainable-development-investment-fund-accelerating-efforts-to-solve-environmental-problems/ IWATA, JAPAN – June 21, 2022 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. (Tokyo: 7272) is pleased to announce today that it has established the Yamaha Motor Sustainability Fund to invest in companies working to solve environmental issues. This is a new initiative that enables carbon offsetting in addition to reducing CO2 levels […]]]>

IWATA, JAPAN – June 21, 2022 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd. (Tokyo: 7272) is pleased to announce today that it has established the Yamaha Motor Sustainability Fund to invest in companies working to solve environmental issues. This is a new initiative that enables carbon offsetting in addition to reducing CO2 levels and the environmental footprint of our existing operations. The fund has a total investment value of $100 million and will be managed for a period of 15 years.

Yamaha Motor’s corporate mission is “to bring new thrills and more fulfilling lives to people around the world,” and environmental initiatives are among the most important themes to achieve this mission. Through this fund, Yamaha Motor intends to foster collaborative relationships with the many companies striving to solve environmental problems and to contribute as a like-minded partner to creating a better world all by mutually improving the activities of each company.

In 2015, the Company established Yamaha Motor Ventures (YMV)* in Silicon Valley, USA, and the Yamaha Motor Exploratory Fund, LP as its own investment fund in 2018. This fund aims to make exploratory investments in start-ups to create new businesses.

In the new Mid-Term Management Plan (2022-2024) announced in February this year, Yamaha Motor has made strengthening its sustainability efforts a central theme in addition to growth strategies and strengthening the foundations of management that the company has pushed to date. . The Company is exploring new technologies and business models that contribute to sustainability to accelerate the carbon offset efforts needed to achieve its carbon neutral goals.

*Yamaha Motor Ventures & Laboratory Silicon Valley Inc. (YMVSV) when founded, but renamed Yamaha Motor Ventures (YMV) in 2022.

Fund Facts

220621 Yamaha Motor establishes sustainable investment fund

Source: Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd.

Yamaha makes your heart spin

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Montrose Environmental: Ransomware Attack Issue Report – Form 8-K https://eco-label-tourism.com/montrose-environmental-ransomware-attack-issue-report-form-8-k/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:23:46 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/montrose-environmental-ransomware-attack-issue-report-form-8-k/ Montrose Environmental Group releases statement on ransomware attack LITTLE ROCK, Ark.-June 14, 2022–Over the past weekend, Montrose Environmental Group, Inc. (NYSE: MEG) determined that it was the target of an organized ransomware attack. Based on the information currently available to us, we believe the incident primarily affected computers and servers in our network of enthalpy […]]]>

Montrose Environmental Group releases statement on ransomware attack

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.-June 14, 2022–Over the past weekend, Montrose Environmental Group, Inc. (NYSE: MEG) determined that it was the target of an organized ransomware attack. Based on the information currently available to us, we believe the incident primarily affected computers and servers in our network of enthalpy analysis labs. The factual patterns of this attack, along with information from law enforcement and independent cybersecurity experts, lead us to believe that this attack was carried out by highly sophisticated malicious actors.

Upon discovery of the attack, we took immediate action, suspending all affected systems, notifying law enforcement, and activating the company’s global network of IT professionals and recovery protocols and data continuity, and engaging third-party experts to begin to remedy the situation. Based on the information available to us at this time, we do not believe our backup data and cloud-based business systems, including email, have been affected, and we are actively working to restore affected systems as soon as possible.

The full investigation and resolution of this incident will take time, and we anticipate that some lab results within our Enthalpy business will be delayed. However, we do not currently anticipate any major disruption to our other services and are in the process of notifying customers as appropriate of any delays or impacts due to the attack. If the investigation identifies access or other impacts to third party data or information, we will notify the relevant third parties and appropriate regulatory agencies.

Although we anticipate limited impact and rapid recovery from the attack, we are closely monitoring our networks with third-party security experts, and circumstances may change as we learn more about the incident. We sincerely apologize to customers of our laboratories and sites who have been or may be impacted by the consequences of this sophisticated cyber-attack.

About Montrose

Montrose is a leading environmental solutions company focused on supporting commercial and government organizations as they meet today’s challenges and prepare for what’s to come tomorrow. With more than 2,700 employees in more than 80 locations around the world, Montrose combines deep local knowledge with an integrated approach to design, engineering and operations, enabling the company to respond efficiently and effectively to requirements unique to each project. From comprehensive air measurement and laboratory services to regulatory compliance, emergency response, permits, engineering and remediation, Montrose provides innovative and practical solutions that enable its customers to meet to their immediate needs – and well ahead of the strategic curve. For more information, visit www.montrose-env.com.

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “intends”, “expects” and “may” and other similar expressions that predict or indicate future events or are not statements of historical issues. Forward-looking statements are based on current information available at the time they are made and on management’s reasonable beliefs or expectations regarding future events, and are subject to risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the control of the Company, which could cause actual performance or results to differ materially from the belief or expectations expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Moreover, many of these factors are, and may continue to be, amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Other factors or events that could cause actual results to differ may also arise from time to time, and it is not possible for the Company to predict all of them. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and the Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect future events, developments or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. required. Investors are encouraged to consult the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, for additional information regarding the risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement.

contacts

Customer requests:
Todd Grosshandler
(919) 850-4392
ir@montrose-env.com

Investor Relations:
Rodny Nacier
(949) 988-3383
ir@montrose-env.com

Media Relations:
Doug Donsky
(646) 361-1427
Montrose@icrinc.com

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Congo’s upcoming oil block auction faces environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/congos-upcoming-oil-block-auction-faces-environmental-issues/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:57:51 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/congos-upcoming-oil-block-auction-faces-environmental-issues/ Antony Sguazzin and Michael J. Kavanagh 06/08/2022 (Bloomberg) – The Democratic Republic of Congo’s plan to auction oil exploration blocks next month threatens to disrupt some of the world’s largest carbon sinks and could jeopardize a $500 million forest preservation deal of dollars. Some of the blocks, which are estimated to contain 16 […]]]>

Antony Sguazzin and Michael J. Kavanagh 06/08/2022

(Bloomberg) – The Democratic Republic of Congo’s plan to auction oil exploration blocks next month threatens to disrupt some of the world’s largest carbon sinks and could jeopardize a $500 million forest preservation deal of dollars.


Some of the blocks, which are estimated to contain 16 billion barrels of crude reserves, overlap the largest tropical peatlands which cover 145,000 square kilometers (56,000 square miles) and store around 30 billion tonnes of carbon, or l equivalent to about 82% of annual global carbon. dioxide emissions. So-called carbon sinks help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels and other activities.

Protecting wetlands and the wider Congo Basin rainforest was the subject of one of the landmark agreements at last year’s COP26 climate conference in Glasgow. Under the compact with the Central African Forest Initiative, Congo will get the funding for five years, provided it meets agreed milestones.

“This letter of engagement will begin with a comprehensive analysis of the extent to which mining, oil and gas titles overlap or impact high-value protected areas, forests and peatlands,” CAFI said in a response. by e-mail to questions. “Donors are working closely with the DRC government to ensure that the commitments set out in the Letter of Intent are met.”

CAFI is a partnership created in 2015 between a coalition of European countries, the European Union, South Korea and the United Kingdom as well as the six countries of the Congo Basin. It aims to curb the loss of forests in the region.

“The geology, geography and environment experts at the Ministry of Hydrocarbons worked meticulously on the selection of the oil blocks, taking into account environmental sensitivities,” the government said in a May video on the tenders, seen by Bloomberg. . “The will of the Head of State is to consider the exploitation of the oil resources of the DRC but also the protection of nature.”

release carbon

The two goals are unlikely to be compatible, said Simon Lewis, professor of global change science at University College London.

Ecosystems “have to maintain their moisture to keep all the carbon locked in. If there are drilling rigs, you risk disturbing the peatlands, drying them out and releasing some of the carbon,” Lewis said in a statement. interview. “They are among the most carbon-dense systems on Earth. This is where you would go first to protect the carbon.

As part of the agreement with the partnership, Congo has pledged to place 30% of its area under protection status and to restore 8 million hectares (19.8 million acres) of land and forest. degraded. The mineral-rich country will also halt mining and hydrocarbon extraction in protected areas if it leads to deforestation, according to the letter of intent. The Congo Basin is the second largest rainforest in the world, after the Amazon.

Oil block auctions will be held on July 28 and 29, according to the government.

“The invitation to big oil companies to trash Congo’s most sensitive ecosystems and drill into the carbon bomb of peatlands is a historic mistake that must be abandoned immediately,” said Irene Wabiwa Betoko, international project manager for the Congo Basin forest for Greenpeace Africa.




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Peak District secures funding to tackle environmental issues – Quest Media Network https://eco-label-tourism.com/peak-district-secures-funding-to-tackle-environmental-issues-quest-media-network/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 07:42:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/peak-district-secures-funding-to-tackle-environmental-issues-quest-media-network/ The Foundation and the Peak District National Park Authority are among 10 organizations to secure funding through the Alan Turing Institute to tackle environmental issues. Environmental and sustainability charities and non-governmental organizations have been chosen to participate in the Alan Turing Institute’s first combined Turing Internship Network (TIN) and Data Study Group (DSG) program. The […]]]>

The Foundation and the Peak District National Park Authority are among 10 organizations to secure funding through the Alan Turing Institute to tackle environmental issues.

Environmental and sustainability charities and non-governmental organizations have been chosen to participate in the Alan Turing Institute’s first combined Turing Internship Network (TIN) and Data Study Group (DSG) program.

The program will place researchers with PhDs in data science within organizations to work on their data challenges. Interns will use their technical and research skills to find new ways to approach these challenges, while gaining in-depth subject matter expertise.

In the Peak District, the funding will be used to develop an automated land cover classification for the 555 square mile national park, using satellite and aerial photography and a range of data science tools in partnership with the University of Cranfield, Bedfordshire.

David Alexander, Senior Data Research Analyst at Peak District National Park, developed this research with lecturers from Cranfield University.

David said: “No feature of the national park landscape is untouched by past or present human activity. However, new technologies, climate change, increasing numbers of people and changing lifestyles mean that our potential to alter the environment and the appearance of the landscape is far greater today than it is today. to any previous generation.

“Understanding land cover change at the landscape scale is fundamental to being able to measure the changes that are already happening, as well as the effect of the improvements we are making.”

The Foundation’s Fundraising Development Manager, Sarah Slowther, added: “Working together, the Foundation and the Peak District National Park Authority were in a unique position to access this exciting new stream of funding. .

“This funding gives us access to the expertise and knowledge of data scientists from across UK universities. This will not only support the priorities of the Foundation, but also the management plan for the national park as well as many other areas of our work.

The new joint initiative demonstrates Turing’s continued commitment to fighting climate change and learning more about its impact through data science and artificial intelligence (AI) research.

Organizations participating in the program are: Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Keep Wales Tidy and Keep Scotland Beautiful, Peak District National Park Authority, The Rivers Trust, Global Witness, John Muir Trust, National Oceanography Centre, Environmental Investigation Agency and Sustrans.

All focus on solving a wide range of critical environmental and sustainability issues.

Along with this research, successful participants will also prepare a related DSG challenge to be held towards the end of the six-month internship. Data science experts will then explore these challenges in more detail. The aim is for these projects to lead to longer-term collaborations with these organizations and others.

Chief Scientist Professor Mark Girolami said: “Bringing together data scientists and industry collaborators will harness our power to work together to tackle a range of environmental issues.

“We focused on environmental organizations because we are committed to finding solutions to some of the big climate-related challenges we face globally. The combined TIN and DSG program will offer innovative data science approaches to solving real-world problems.

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Combine your interest in social and environmental issues with “technical skills” for Temple’s Geospatial Data Science program https://eco-label-tourism.com/combine-your-interest-in-social-and-environmental-issues-with-technical-skills-for-temples-geospatial-data-science-program/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 14:56:20 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/combine-your-interest-in-social-and-environmental-issues-with-technical-skills-for-temples-geospatial-data-science-program/ After 10 years of teaching statistics in high school, John Fitzgibbons found himself on the other side of the class as a student in Temple University Professional Science Masters Program (PSM) in Geospatial Data Science (GDS). Fitzgibbons decided to make a career change in 2019, fresh from getting married with a child on the way […]]]>
After 10 years of teaching statistics in high school, John Fitzgibbons found himself on the other side of the class as a student in Temple University Professional Science Masters Program (PSM) in Geospatial Data Science (GDS).

Fitzgibbons decided to make a career change in 2019, fresh from getting married with a child on the way — and unknowingly heading into the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It was a very scary decision and a particularly scary time for a change,” Fitzgibbons said. “I didn’t know how long it was going to take to find a position after the program. I didn’t know what was going to come out of it. Looking back, I couldn’t be happier with the support I received from home and Temple because I really love what I do.

Fitzgibbons completed a graduate certificate in Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) at Temple in 2020. Afterwards, he moved on to the PSM in GDS program.

Shortly after graduating in 2021, he was hired as a Data Visualization Associate for the City of Philadelphia Child and Family Office. Like Fitzgibbons, about 96% of Temple’s PSM alumni in GIS and GDS have secured employment in GDS or data science upon completion of the one-year program, according to Liz JanczewskiProgram Student Services Coordinator.

The program was officially launched at the end of 2019. Lee HachadoorianPSM’s deputy director in the GIS and GDS programs, said Temple observed a need for programming and statistical analysis skills in the industry.

“We knew there was a demand in the workforce from people working in geospatial, so we started paying attention to that,” Hachadoorian said. “We thought it would be really important to focus on those skills and move forward with curriculum development while thinking carefully about how to differentiate GDS and GIS.”

Because so much data has a spatial element, graduates of GDS and GIS programs can apply their skills to any industry, Hachadoorian said. The GDS differs, however, with its emphasis on big data and advanced statistical education.

On the Temple campus. (Photo via facebook.com/templeu)

A combined interest in social issues and the “technical skills” inherent in GDS attracted Stephane Franciscoformer PSM 2022 in GDS, on the program.

“A lot of my peers who also went to liberal arts college have the same gap as me. They really enjoyed learning and got passionate about the subject, but their skill is doing research and reading and writing, which is what a lot of people have,” said Francisco, who has a degree in urban studies. of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. “I just wanted a more specific skill in a growing industry. This program definitely fits that category.

Three quarters into the program, Francisco was hired as a data analyst for the Urban Health Collective at Drexel University.

Simultaneously working in the field full-time and completing a master’s program can be exhausting, Francisco said, but the class schedule allows him to balance the two. By design, all classes begin at or after 5:30 p.m. so that students can maintain employment and other opportunities.

“The jobs are out there. If you improve your skills that way, you can find something where you can use it.”

Assistant Director Lee Hachadoorian

Fitzgibbons ran into a scheduling problem along the way – one that Hachadoorian quickly remedied. A class Fitzgibbons needed to complete the program was unavailable, and he feared delaying graduation for another semester. To help, Hachadoorian offered to teach Fitzgibbons the course as an independent study during his lunch hour.

“Every teacher is so helpful and so knowledgeable about what we can do with this kind of technology,” Fitzgibbons said. “He can do so much to benefit public policy, public health and education. They really see how it can bring awareness to all the issues that we see societally.

“He could just create an app to really show, ‘Hey, here’s what’s going on in Philadelphia, a city that’s so affected by violence or poverty,’ and then hopefully get it into the hands of the right people who can start to make a difference,” he said.

Hachadoorian isn’t just excited about the job retention rates of the PSM in GDS program. The vice principal is also excited about the work that Temple alumni have taken on, such as jobs with city and state agencies, engineering companies, geotechnology companies, and nonprofit organizations.

“I am so proud of our alumni, and the truth is there is room for more growth,” Hachadoorian said. “The advantage is that if you’re interested in that stuff, the jobs are out there. If you improve your skills that way, you can find something where you can use it.

Learn more about Temple’s PSM in GDS program -30-

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Kitchener-Conestoga Provincial Candidates Answer Questions on Important Environmental Issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/kitchener-conestoga-provincial-candidates-answer-questions-on-important-environmental-issues/ Fri, 27 May 2022 14:01:37 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/kitchener-conestoga-provincial-candidates-answer-questions-on-important-environmental-issues/ Wilmot Township voters are concerned about their environment. And they want whoever they elect on June 2 to have a positive impact on the environment. The New Hamburg Independent asked five Kitchener-Conestoga candidates – from the New Democratic Party, Progressive Conservatives, Liberal Party, Green Party and New Blue Party of Ontario – the following questions […]]]>

Wilmot Township voters are concerned about their environment. And they want whoever they elect on June 2 to have a positive impact on the environment.

The New Hamburg Independent asked five Kitchener-Conestoga candidates – from the New Democratic Party, Progressive Conservatives, Liberal Party, Green Party and New Blue Party of Ontario – the following questions about the environment by mail electronic. Only three candidates submitted their answers. The Green Party and New Blue Party of Ontario failed to send in their responses after an email reminder.

Citizens are concerned about preserving the environment. They are calling for a moratorium on MZOs and gravel quarry permits. What do you have to say about that?

Karen Meissner (NDP): “Currently, gravel extraction approvals are not well coordinated. They are disruptive and we see them popping up everywhere. I support calls to hold new approvals for gravel mines until we have a plan in place – until we know how much we need and we have a plan for where we can put mines.

Mike Harris (PC): “PC Ontario has been very clear that MZOs will only be granted with the support of local municipal councils after they have done their own due diligence on the project. This tool has been used to create over 4,100 new long-term care beds and 58,000 housing units, including over 600 supportive housing units.

Melanie Van Alphen (Liberal): “I support community advocacy on these issues and will continue to work with them to bring their voice to Queen’s Park. The Ontario Liberal Party is committed to eliminating MZOs and replacing them with new rules, including transparent consultations. We will also strengthen environmental monitoring and protections on gravel and aggregate extraction.

Eight years from the horizon of 2030, what is your party’s plan to reduce gas emissions by 50% by 2030?

Meissner (NDP): “The NDP’s Green and Democratic New Deal includes a mandate for all newly constructed public, residential and commercial buildings to be net zero emissions by 2030, alongside a world-class building retrofit program which will generate $15.2 billion in annual revenue. economic activity and create 100,000 jobs. We will implement Ontario’s first zero-emission vehicle strategy. In addition, we will support municipalities in the transition to a fleet of all-electric public transit vehicles. These are just a few of the overall strategies.

Harris (PC): “Ontario is making great strides in reducing its greenhouse gas emissions and we are on track to meet the Paris Agreement reduction targets. Ontario’s PC government has made historic investments in green vehicle technology and is partnering with large-scale manufacturers like Dofasco to convert their coal-fired blast furnace to a low-emission electric furnace.

Van Alphen (LIB): “The Ontario Liberal Party will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50% below 2005 levels by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050. We have a plan to provide a $9,500 rebate for electric vehicles and charging stations, eliminate installation connection fees for rooftop solar panels, renew the Ontario Electricity Rebate, and switch to a supply into completely clean energy.

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6 biggest environmental problems in Hong Kong in 2022 https://eco-label-tourism.com/6-biggest-environmental-problems-in-hong-kong-in-2022/ Sun, 22 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/6-biggest-environmental-problems-in-hong-kong-in-2022/ Following the latest IPCC report published in April 2022, warning that it is now or never to limit global warming to 1.5°C, the climate crisis is clearly accelerating at an unprecedented rate. From deforestation to plastic pollution, several factors are driving worsening climate change. Here are some of the biggest environmental issues we will […]]]>

Following the latest IPCC report published in April 2022, warning that it is now or never to limit global warming to 1.5°C, the climate crisis is clearly accelerating at an unprecedented rate. From deforestation to plastic pollution, several factors are driving worsening climate change. Here are some of the biggest environmental issues we will face in Hong Kong in 2022.

Hong Kong’s Biggest Environmental Problems

1. Outdoor air pollution

One of the major environmental issues in Hong Kong is air pollution. According to a study on global mortality and pollution levels published in The Planetary Health of the Lancet log, 9 million people worldwide die each year from outdoor air pollution. Long-term exposure to severe air pollution also poses serious health problems ranging from chronic respiratory infections and diseases to increased risk of cancer.

Based on Hong Kong’s Air Quality and Health Index (AQHI) records, street-level air pollution in densely populated areas including Causeway Bay, Central and Mong Kok , often exceeds WHO guidelines, reflecting a significant number of Hong Kong residents breathing air containing high levels of pollutants every day.




The causes of air pollution in Hong Kong stem from sources such as fossil fuel motor vehicles and regional smog, which is caused by pollutants from ships and industrial power plants in the city and mainland China. .

Although the Hong Kong government has announced its intention to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050, the current rate of carbon emissions shows no signs of slowing down. As for 2021, the the number of private motor vehicles registered in Hong Kong reaches 657,000, nearly 30,000 more vehicles than the previous year. Despite being at home one of the best public transport systems in the world, Hong Kong residents still rely heavily on private cars to get around the city and this proportion continues to grow year on year. Over the past decade, the volume of passenger cars has increased by almost a third, contributing to massive amounts of carbon emissions in the city.

While the government has made efforts to regulate emissions from industrial power stations and ships that pass through our waters, the smog in the Pearl River Delta region has proven difficult to control. Collaborative efforts with Guangdong authorities have been made to improve air quality in the Greater Bay Area, but improvements in air quality remain to be seen.


One of three strategic landfills in Tuen Mun, Hong Kong. Photo by: Edwin Lee/Flickr

2. Landfill Waste

One of the most pressing environmental issues Hong Kong is currently facing is landfilling. Each year, approximately 4.17 million tons of solid waste are heading to our landfills, and during the coronavirus pandemic, local waste has increased exponentially thanks to the increased use of take-out boxes, plastic cutlery and single-use masks. Landfill gas, which is emissions from landfills breaking down organic waste, will continue to increase as a result and contribute to global warming, especially considering that 40-60% of landfill emissions are landfill gas. methane and have a warming potential 10 times that of carbon dioxide. .

As one of the most densely populated cities in the world with a population of almost 7.5 million, Hong Kong is in an extremely difficult position to create new dedicated landfills. Reducing and recycling waste is the only viable long-term solution to the city’s insurmountable landfill waste problem. And while the waste tax system adopted by the Legislative Council at the end of 2021 – 16 years after it was first proposed – is a good first step, there is still a long way to go to solve the problem.

3. Plastic pollution

Even before the coronavirus pandemic, Hong Kong generated approximately 3.9 billion disposable food and beverage containers every year. That’s 170 takeaways and 180 disposable drinks for every Hong Konger. As restaurants limit opening hours and seating capacity during the pandemic, people are relying on takeout and the amount of plastic containers and cutlery being used and thrown away has only increased. In 2020, plastics accounted for 21% of the city’s total municipal solid waste (MSW), accounting for the third largest share of MSW after food waste and paper. The city’s beaches and waterways are drowning in plastic, and levels of microplastics in the sea are 40% higher than the global average. According to estimates, more than 5,000 pieces of microplastic can be found in every square meter of sea.

Some restaurant businesses have made the effort to embrace biodegradable and even compostable take-out packaging and utensils, but a majority of local restaurants and small businesses are still opting for low-cost materials like Styrofoam.

The lack of an effective recycling infrastructure is a major contributing factor to Hong Kong’s plastic crisis. In 2019, less than 20% of plastic packaging waste was recycled due to lack of adequate recycling facilities. Before China’s waste ban, where the country banned the import of unprocessed materials, Hong Kong used to dump the city’s waste on the mainland for recycling. Since the policy’s implementation, Hong Kong has further developed enough recycling plants to compensate. While some government interventions such as the Plastic Recycling Pilot Scheme appear to be working, as Hong Kong saw a 27% increase in locally recycled plastics in 2020, the plastic problem still haunts the city.

4. Food waste

Known as an international cuisine paradise, Hong Kong has a reputation for being affordable and offering an amazing variety of international cuisines. Therefore, this means that food waste is also high in the city and undoubtedly one of the biggest environmental issues Hong Kong faces.

Food waste in Hong Kong accounts for about 30% of municipal solid waste that goes directly to landfills. In 2019, 1,067 tonnes of food waste was generated from commercial and industrial sources such as restaurants, hotels and wet markets. The amount of food waste has also increased, particularly in the F&B industry where it increased from 800 tonnes per day in 2012 to 1,000 tonnes of waste generated per day in 2019.

While the government has set up educational initiatives and a functioning organic waste recovery center OPARKmore 3,600 tons of food waste are still being sent to Hong Kong landfills every daycontributing to more than one hundred thousand tons of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

environmental issues, land reclamation in hong kong Land fill site for Central piers, Hong Kong. Picture by: Piqsels

5. Loss of biodiversity

Hong Kong has a surprisingly rich biodiversity thanks to its vast natural terrain and coastal waters. In fact, 40% of the city’s land belongs to national parks and protected areas, which are home to over 3,300 species of vascular plants, 57 species of land mammals, and over 540 species of birds. Our waters are also home to over 1,000 species of fish.

However, in order to make room for the city’s already dense and growing population, Hong Kong has put a lot of effort into urbanization and land reclamation. Land development, be it deforestation or illegal dumping of waste, is one of the growing environmental issues in Hong Kong and has led to significant impacts on local biodiversity and habits.

The pink dolphin, also known as the Chinese white dolphin, is a prime example of how local species are threatened by continued land development. The waters surrounding Hong Kong have been a habitat for dolphins for centuries, with recorded sightings dating back to the Tang Dynasty. The number of pink dolphins that frequent the shores of Hong Kong has dropped to around 300 in recent years due to intense maritime traffic and, above all, the decrease in its habitat. Development of Chek Lap Kok Island, home to Hong Kong International Airport, and associated land reclamation has reduced the amount of fish dolphins can eat while dredging has exposed pollution of the seabed causing water pollution. A massive 1,700 hectare land reclamation plan near the eastern waters of Lantau Island that was proposed in 2018 will further degrade dolphin habitat and increase vulnerabilities to sea level rise.

Another serious threat to Hong Kong’s biodiversity is illegal wildlife trafficking. The city is home to one of the largest hubs for the illegal wildlife trafficking industry thanks to its free ports, geographic location in the Greater Bay Area, and accessibility to other Asian countries. Every year, the city sees millions of live animals and their derivatives pass through its ports. In 2019 alone, more than 7,000 endangered animals were illegally traded in the city, including pangolins and live turtles. However a landmark bill was passed in August 2021 that will treat illegal wildlife trade and seizures as a serious crime while paying greater attention to criminals and organized networks rather than transporters and mules. The passage of the amendment is intended to deter smuggling operations and supply networks in the city.

6. Water pollution

Hong Kong is a unique city surrounded by the South China Sea, where the marine waters cover approximately 1700 km² and are home to a wide range of different marine environments. In the early 1970s and 1980s, most of the city’s sewage and sewage was discharged into the sea, with little or no treatment. As a result, Hong Kong waters have seen an increase in organic and inorganic pollutants, a reduction in oxygen content and an increase in bacteria levels. In 2005, Hong Kong generated around 2 million tonnes of sewage as well as industrial effluent every day, making it one of the main sources of water pollution in Hong Kong.

Marine pollution has also been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic as 4,680 to 6,240 tonnes of marine plastic waste is making its way through Hong Kong waters. An estimated 1.56 billion face masks were thrown into the ocean during that time, which experts say will take up to 450 years to decompose. Microplastics from single-use masks are also incredibly harmful to marine life and the ecosystem, potentially killing up to 100,000 marine mammals and turtles, and over a million seabirds.

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The aquarium helps children solve environmental problems in Bridgeport, Fairfield https://eco-label-tourism.com/the-aquarium-helps-children-solve-environmental-problems-in-bridgeport-fairfield-2/ Sat, 21 May 2022 10:16:07 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/the-aquarium-helps-children-solve-environmental-problems-in-bridgeport-fairfield-2/ An expansion of a program to engage children in science will try to give them the tools to understand and help solve environmental problems in their own communities. The initiative, which begins this summer, will build on Mystic Aquarium’s previous programs. Mystic will work with local organizations, including Wakeman Boys and Girls Club in Bridgeport […]]]>

An expansion of a program to engage children in science will try to give them the tools to understand and help solve environmental problems in their own communities.

The initiative, which begins this summer, will build on Mystic Aquarium’s previous programs. Mystic will work with local organizations, including Wakeman Boys and Girls Club in Bridgeport and Fairfield, to identify environmental issues in their own community and develop plans to address those challenges, said Katie Cubina, senior vice president of the aquarium. for mission programs.


“Maybe it’s the water quality in a local stream or the erosion of the beach or the litter,” she said. “Maybe they want to set up a rain garden or a butterfly garden or maybe they want to be part of a national citizen science program that monitors horseshoe crabs or amphibians.”

Cubina said the initiative stems from a desire to work with young people on things happening in their communities, instead of transplanting issues that concern the aquarium.

There is a significant environmental justice issue in underserved and high-needs communities, Cubina said, and what works in one community may not necessarily work in another. She said the organization wants to be respectful of people’s lived experiences and work collaboratively and strategically with youth and adults at each site, as well as other community members.

“It’s something we’re really launching this summer with a peer-to-peer leadership and environmental stewardship academy,” she said. “We bring groups from across the country who are on our program to participate in these intense week-long workshops.”

Mystic will also visit sites, such as the Wakeman Boys and Girls Club, with resources to help them learn about environmental issues and advocacy. .

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The aquarium helps children solve environmental problems in Bridgeport, Fairfield https://eco-label-tourism.com/the-aquarium-helps-children-solve-environmental-problems-in-bridgeport-fairfield/ Sat, 21 May 2022 10:06:26 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/the-aquarium-helps-children-solve-environmental-problems-in-bridgeport-fairfield/ An expansion of a program to engage children in science will try to give them the tools to understand and help solve environmental problems in their own communities. The initiative, which begins this summer, will build on Mystic Aquarium’s previous programs. Mystic will work with local organizations, including Wakeman Boys and Girls Club in Bridgeport […]]]>

An expansion of a program to engage children in science will try to give them the tools to understand and help solve environmental problems in their own communities.

The initiative, which begins this summer, will build on Mystic Aquarium’s previous programs. Mystic will work with local organizations, including Wakeman Boys and Girls Club in Bridgeport and Fairfield, to identify environmental issues in their own community and develop plans to address those challenges, said Katie Cubina, senior vice president of the aquarium. for mission programs.


“Maybe it’s the water quality in a local stream or the erosion of the beach or the litter,” she said. “Maybe they want to set up a rain garden or a butterfly garden or maybe they want to be part of a national citizen science program that monitors horseshoe crabs or amphibians.”

Cubina said the initiative stems from a desire to work with young people on things happening in their communities, instead of transplanting issues that concern the aquarium.

There is a significant environmental justice issue in underserved and high-needs communities, Cubina said, and what works in one community may not necessarily work in another. She said the organization wants to be respectful of people’s lived experiences and work collaboratively and strategically with youth and adults at each site, as well as other community members.

“That’s something we’re really launching this summer with a peer-to-peer leadership and environmental stewardship academy,” she said. “We bring in groups from across the country who are on our program to participate in these intense, week-long workshops.”

Mystic will also visit sites, such as the Wakeman Boys and Girls Club, with resources to help them learn about environmental issues and advocacy. .

James Murphy, character and leadership program director at Wakeman, said the partnership between his organization and Mystic is excellent.

The two groups have worked together for many years.

“Every year we take a big group there,” he said. “We’re lucky because it’s a nationwide program. But we only have an hour to drive.

Wakeman teens can also take an overnight trip to the aquarium where they meet young people from other cities and states. Murphy said they would take what they learn back to Bridgeport, which is important because it’s a coastal city.

“With that experience at Mystic, working with their team, I think they’re going to be able to bring something back here so we can start our own little bands locally,” he said. “We’ll see how we can impact Seaside and see how we can impact St. Mary’s-by-the-Sea.”

Murphy said the program is usually only offered in Bridgeport, but will also be offered in Fairfield this year. This will allow Wakeman to bring children from each community together, which he says is important so they can learn from each other.

He said kids are introduced to STEM early at Wakeman, allowing them to progress through programs as they get older, with the goal of getting them to start thinking about going to high schools, colleges or science-based trade schools.

“We try to provide access at a young age,” he said. “So that it’s always on their minds as the next step.”

Murphy said kids who have gone through programs like this in their clubhouse have ended up at great universities.

“That’s always what’s important to me,” he said. “No matter what city you’re from or where you are, you should always have access to it.”

Cubina said the Sea Research Foundation, which operates Mystic, has received grants from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, which aims to create mentorship programs for youth in communities. in need.

The grant helps Mystic invest more than $1.5 million in participating communities to support their work locally, an average of $30,000 per site, Cubina said. The money will cover local staff time, travel costs, and all training, curriculum, and supplies needed to successfully implement the program.

Cubina said Mystic has developed a program that introduces young people to STEM, adding that each site the aquarium works with will recruit up to 24 young people between the ages of 6 and 10, as well as community-based teen mentors.

“The content of the program is really fun and hands-on surveys because when you work with young people outside of school, kids choose to opt in and opt out of these programs,” she said. “Must be fun if the kids want to do it.”

Those who go through the program really enjoy it, Murphy said, adding that the mentor-mentee relationship is a crucial part.

The program will also provide career role models, Cubina said, so young people can see there is a place for them in these fields.

She also sees the program helping children to be their own agents of change. She said the goal of the program is to make children understand that everyone benefits from protecting, restoring and conserving wild places.

“They hear all this unhappiness and they really want to make a difference,” she said. “They have the power to do that, and part of the workshop we’re going to do with them is Advocacy 101, because local leaders want to hear from kids much more than they want to hear from adults.”

joshua.labella@hearstmediact.com

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Sacramento County Board District 5: where are the candidates on environmental issues? https://eco-label-tourism.com/sacramento-county-board-district-5-where-are-the-candidates-on-environmental-issues/ Thu, 19 May 2022 18:42:54 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/sacramento-county-board-district-5-where-are-the-candidates-on-environmental-issues/ This will be a busy election year for residents of Sacramento County. Depending on where you live, you might vote for a new county representative, city council member, sheriff, and district attorney. And those are just the local races. If you live in County District 5, you will choose a new representative on the Sacramento […]]]>

This will be a busy election year for residents of Sacramento County. Depending on where you live, you might vote for a new county representative, city council member, sheriff, and district attorney. And those are just the local races.

If you live in County District 5, you will choose a new representative on the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors. Don Nottoli, who has represented the district since 1994, is not seeking re-election.

The district includes towns like Rancho Cordova and Elk Grove, and extends to communities in Galt and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta like Isleton.

The area is vast, and much of its population is centralized in the ever-growing town of Elk Grove.

That’s probably why the four candidates vying for the seat all come from Elk Grove, which was once one of the fastest growing cities in the country.

with the four candidates at a climate change forum hosted by Sacramento Environmental Council, 350 Sacramento, Sierra Club of Sacramento, Citizens’ Climate Lobby.

Below are the candidates’ answers to questions about carbon neutrality, roaming and transportation.

The following answers have been edited for clarity and brevity.

Interview Highlights

On Sacramento County’s 2030 carbon neutral goal

Pat Hume: I think when we set strict deadlines, it puts the aggressiveness of the situation in front of us, which is good as a call to action. But it sometimes causes a rush to judgment before we can consider the unintended consequences of certain things. And so one of the things the county can obviously do to achieve carbon neutrality is to use green energy sources. Solar is the most obvious example. But we have a grid that can’t even meet the demands for electricity that are put on it as they exist…And then one of the first things we can do is make sure that all the new buildings coming in are certified LEED Gold or above and ensure the fleet is electrified and operating with SMUD and all of its carbon neutral goals.

Alex Joe: I would wholeheartedly say that the programs we run here in the county reflect the needs of the community and have the community as partners in doing simple things. There are many things we can do to turn off water and lights and check our travel routes when we go out and shop, plant trees – we have very many aspects of this issue that we can affect like individuals and then as a community. Support these areas and give our children the opportunity to see what is needed and what they need to do so that they can help make progress possible.

Steve Ly: I think one of the biggest offenders is Kiefer Landfill. If you look at it, we can’t just bury our trash and hope it goes away. We bury it today, we’ll drink it tomorrow. And so, as one of the biggest offenders across the country, we have to start looking at the landfill and exploring the possibilities of green energy… We have to look at other countries and see what they’re doing. And there are great examples, if you look specifically at Korea and how they’re able to do their system and how they’re able to manage their waste is key. The other thing that’s really important is fleet services, and that’s at all levels.

Jaclyn Moreno: We know that transportation accounts for about 40% of all carbon emissions in this state. And so I think we’re not going to meet California’s carbon targets if we don’t reduce the number of vehicle miles driven, if we don’t reduce the number of cars on the road. And so I think two areas that we can focus on to achieve those goals would be land use – using land use as a tool to get closer to California’s climate goals by supporting an urban growth limit, supporting more conservation efforts for recreation and agriculture and encouraging mixed-use infill development where goods, services and transportation are nearby. And then in terms of transportation…I think it’s extremely important that we work together to develop a bus rapid transit plan to get people moving, to get cars off the road, ensuring that ridership is easy, efficient and reliable.

On how the county should help our most climate-sensitive residents, such as the homeless

Alex Joe: The United States is built on education and the opportunities that come from that education. In this case, where companies will come into [low-income] areas, they pollute, they take a very great privilege in creating problems that lead to disease which is created by clusters of cancer and a myriad of other diseases that are difficult to live with and their property is thereby devalued and effectively taken away of their property. And that goes against the practice of growing wealth that can be transferred to families. Another issue would just be racism and redlining and other factors that exist within our society that have created issues for people of color and other Native Americans and people who are not wealthy to have a restriction built in at birth, often eliminating their ability to thrive.

Jaclyn Moreno: [Senate Bill 1000] required local jurisdictions to develop an environmental justice plan and include that environmental justice plan as part of the overall plan. And I know for District 5, the North Vineyard community, it was included in this study. As with any equity issue, it’s really important to talk to the people most affected by the challenges that will arise with climate change. And that means not only including their voices in the potential problems that will arise, but also including their voices in the solution. To fight homelessness, we have to talk about housing. We need to talk about site plans. The City of Sacramento is the only jurisdiction that has a site plan at this time. We need to force other jurisdictions, including Sacramento County, to create site plans and make sure people have a place to go.

Pat Hume: We’ve spent about 200 years with bad behavior, and we’ve really spent the last 40 years trying to recognize it. And “when you know better, do better”, as Maya Angelou says. So I think the number one thing…the county can do is use planning and zoning effectively. As I always say, the best way to reduce vehicle miles traveled and traffic congestion is to put people where they live and where they want to be closer to each other. I’ve been working…to try to bring passenger rail to town, to try to expand light rail, to try to work on more frequency and coverage for our transit system, as well as to have capacity road for the electrification of our vehicles, which will still require roads to travel.

Steve Ly: When I was mayor, I was on the air quality board, and one of the things we did was we had monitoring stations all over the county. And part of that is knowing when a certain area isn’t advised to actually be outdoors. Not only this type of approach, but also ways to deal with it appropriately – ensuring and monitoring that the biggest polluters are controlled. Now, when it comes to the homeless population, or the homeless population, what really needs to happen is housing first. Across the country, when you look at communities, if you find the house, that solves the first problem, and then you can then look at some of the other problems that come with it – either mental illness, drug problems, skills not techniques, technical skills – that need to be addressed. And of course number 3 deals with affordable housing across the country.

On reducing carbon emissions from transportation, which is the number one cause of emissions in California

Steve Ly: The first thing is to have a robust public transport. When I was on council we talked, we deliberated on a bus rapid transit system – building regional public transport where you can actually take a light rail in the south of the county and be able to get to the airport . These are things that would undoubtedly alleviate road congestion and also pollution. And again, going back to the municipalities, I think the municipalities, respectively, in the region really need to move towards electrifying their fleets. When I was on the environmental mayors of the United States Conference of Mayors, we talked about this – leveraging our buying power to be able to get deep discounts on electric vehicles, and that makes sense . For us to really move properly in this direction, we need to stop talking about it and start doing it.

Jaclyn Moreno: Experts agree that we need to reduce vehicle miles traveled in order to meet climate emissions targets set by the State of California. We know that Elk Grove will have two train stations, and I’m glad those stations are good for moving some people. But the point is, one, we need to move more people, and two, people will still have to go to these stations, which ultimately won’t reduce the vehicle miles traveled much… I think that the best value for money will be to create a bus rapid transit plan linking our regions with clean energy buses. When we have fast, reliable and efficient services, we will use these buses, but not without a comprehensive awareness program also in place.

Alex Joe: Florida has toll roads that stretch from Orlando to the Kennedy Space Center. These toll roads are very clean and efficient, but for the occasional snake or turtle. They are smooth and very convenient for transporting people from point A to point B. To achieve similar opportunities here in Sacramento, we have secondary roads to our major highways that may have tolls. We have corridors to build between different parts of Sacramento County. What we should be doing in addition to building these corridors is to promote the use of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles to reduce impacts. Now, I don’t believe we should expand on Watt Avenue once more, and I think the connections between Rancho Cordova and Fair Oaks should be explored.

Pat Hume: I focus on mobility options, and it differs depending on whether you are traveling intra-regional, inter-regional, or mega-regional. And we need to empower people to make solid choices about what suits their lives and their transportation needs. But the one thing I will say is what we see with the electrification of the fleet, it does great things for GHG emissions, but it does nothing for congestion… One vehicle miles driven, the definition of that is whether it takes you a minute or an hour, it’s still a vehicle-mile traveled. And so if we build ourselves into a state of frustration with congestion, we’ve done great things to improve our air quality, but we haven’t really improved people who want to have individual mobility.

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