Environmental problems – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 05:54:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental problems – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Effectively use livestock waste to avoid any possible environmental problem: Tomar https://eco-label-tourism.com/effectively-use-livestock-waste-to-avoid-any-possible-environmental-problem-tomar/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 05:54:56 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/effectively-use-livestock-waste-to-avoid-any-possible-environmental-problem-tomar/ Narendra Singh Tomar, Union Minister of Agriculture and Farmer Welfare (Photo courtesy of IDF Twitter) The central government of India has warned that there might be an environmental problem and impact on human beings and to avoid such a situation, proper utilization […]]]>







Narendra Singh Tomar, Union Minister of Agriculture and Farmer Welfare (Photo courtesy of IDF Twitter)





The central government of India has warned that there might be an environmental problem and impact on human beings and to avoid such a situation, proper utilization of livestock waste is essential.












Giving a warning during a session on ‘food, food and waste’, Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare Minister Narendra Singh Tomar said there was an urgent need to step up a campaign for the efficient use of animal waste as the unfavorable environment could make feed for dairy cattle a shortage and human beings will have to bear the brunt of it.

“Availability of fodder may be a challenge in the future; we should deliberate on how to avoid this. We must work to find solutions to the challenges of the sector and many, including start-ups and cooperatives, are working on this. We need to ensure that our cattle get the food, because proper feeding will improve milk production, thus improving milk production. Tomar added.

During the session, Tomar said that we don’t usually dispose of waste properly. Whether it’s crop stubble or disposing of fruit and vegetable waste in homes, converting it into wealth is the need of the hour.












It is necessary to reflect and work on how we can use waste in different ways. He also pointed out that natural and organic farming are a few ways to use waste for agriculture and could help save the environment. Tomar informed participants that the PUSA Institute has developed a decomposer that is used on farms that are also used to feed cattle.

Participating in the session, Varsha Joshi, Additional Secretary, Cattle and Dairy Products, Ministry of Fisheries, Animal Husbandry and Dairy, Government of India, highlighted the efforts undertaken by the government, aimed at improving the availability fodder as part of the National Livestock Mission.

Joshi informed us that the Livestock Department has always worked in tandem with NDDB. “The ministry and NDDB have set up a new biogas plant in Ramnagar where the dairy plant will run on biogas. We plan to replicate it nationwide,” Joshi said.












The session – Food, Food and Waste – was organized on the third day of the IDF World Dairy Summit 2022. Manager Dairy, Trouw Nutrition, Netherlands, Dr Chetan Arun Narake, Director, Gokul Milk Cooperative, Kolhapur and Niranjan Karade, Team Leader (IPM Cell), NDDB.











First published: September 15, 2022, 11:08 a.m. IST


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UF supercomputer helps solve Florida’s daunting agricultural and environmental problems – Action News Jax https://eco-label-tourism.com/uf-supercomputer-helps-solve-floridas-daunting-agricultural-and-environmental-problems-action-news-jax/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 16:48:43 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/uf-supercomputer-helps-solve-floridas-daunting-agricultural-and-environmental-problems-action-news-jax/ TALLAHASSEE — A supercomputer housed at the University of Florida is being used by researchers at several state universities to solve some of Florida’s most pressing agricultural and environmental problems. STORY: Conditions at Baker County Immigrant Detention Center Targeted by Abuse Allegations The computer, known as HiPerGator, went live in early 2021 and is touted […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE — A supercomputer housed at the University of Florida is being used by researchers at several state universities to solve some of Florida’s most pressing agricultural and environmental problems.

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The computer, known as HiPerGator, went live in early 2021 and is touted by higher education officials as the 22nd fastest supercomputer in the world. The $50 million supercomputer was a gift to the university from NVIDIA, a Silicon Valley-based technology company, and company co-founder Chris Malachowsky, a graduate of the University of Florida.

Researchers from other universities are given access to use the capabilities of the computer.

A committee of the state university system’s board of governors received an update on the technology’s applications during a meeting Tuesday in Pensacola.

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David Norton, vice president of research at UF, detailed how HiPerGator can be used to mitigate citrus greening, a disease that has ravaged Florida’s important citrus industry.

“We set a record for cases of oranges (produced) last year. For that, it is extremely important to understand what the inventory of our citrus crops, groves and trees in the state of Florida is – their age, their health,” Norton said.

Norton said a company started by the university can fly drones over citrus groves to take photographic inventories of the trees. Another university-started venture can capture satellite images of the state’s entire citrus harvest “to understand where the trees are struggling and what our inventory is,” he said.

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The supercomputer is used to process and make sense of the images, Norton said.

“You can imagine the number of images that have to be processed from all this information and delivered periodically in a timely manner, often enough to be useful to farmers. It’s not possible unless you use artificial intelligence,” Norton said.

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The supercomputer could also be applied in research related to the fight against COVID-19, Norton said, identifying which variants of the coronavirus could become dominant in the future and helping researchers decide where to put resources to develop new vaccines. .

Meanwhile, researchers at Florida International University in Miami are using HiPerGator to address flooding issues that are increasingly affecting South Florida.

Andres Gil, senior vice president for research and economic development at CRF, said the school’s Institute of the Environment is using HiPerGator’s artificial intelligence capabilities to predict future coastal flooding.

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Sea level rise, seasonal high tides, storm surges, inland precipitation, river flow, and groundwater level rise are part of the “complex” set. of factors factored into those predictions, Gil said. Providing forecasts could help guide emergency responses to flooding.

“The goals of the project using HiPerGator are to understand the role of local, regional and distant environmental predictors in sea level variability using machine learning,” Gil said.

About 120 non-UF based university users have accessed HiPerGator.

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Jim Clark, provost and executive vice president of academic affairs at Florida State University, said Jonathan Adams, a professor at FSU’s School of Information, used the supercomputer in an application that combines music and medicine.

“He’s using HiPerGator to create synthetic music via Jukebox, to create binaural beats to aid in patient care (for) recovering patients,” Clark said, referring to an AI tool called Jukebox.

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FSU is in the “early stages” of determining the best way to use artificial intelligence in lessons for all students, Clark said.

As universities seek to increase use of the technology, Norton said UF is leveraging the supercomputer in all facets of its research efforts — and the technology could provide a significant return on investment for the state.

“Artificial Intelligence is changing the way we do business, in so many different industries, so many areas, and it’s just one of many really important areas where the State of Florida needs to be a leader. “said Norton.

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UMaine Lab solves environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/umaine-lab-solves-environmental-problems/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 02:53:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/umaine-lab-solves-environmental-problems/ ORONO, Maine (WABI) – The University of Maine’s Cooperative Extension Research and Diagnostics Laboratory serves as a hub for environmental research on a number of issues related to the Pine Tree State. We stopped for the tour of Governor Mills facilities and learned more about their mission. Much has changed in the four years since […]]]>

ORONO, Maine (WABI) – The University of Maine’s Cooperative Extension Research and Diagnostics Laboratory serves as a hub for environmental research on a number of issues related to the Pine Tree State.

We stopped for the tour of Governor Mills facilities and learned more about their mission.

Much has changed in the four years since the UMaine Diagnostics and Research Laboratory opened, but the exploration mission remains the same.

After securing state funding for the lab, Governor Mills got a hands-on insight.

“This is an example of world-class research and world-class education taking place right here in Orono, Maine,” Mills said. “It’s all very recent research and current data on current issues.”

The facility has extensive aquaculture resources, a necropsy room and a plant pathology center, but it was the tick research lab – with potted samples of massive winter ticks – that let a lasting impression.

“We are at the forefront of research management strategies and also look at different types of diseases and new diseases that are emerging online, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Connecticut,” said lab director Jim Dill.

The projects studied in the laboratory will make it possible to answer environmental questions such as diseases caused by tick bites and the future of the lobster population, amid coastal climate change.

“One of my favorite projects is actually with WL Gore, Gore Tex, where we’re looking at a pest of Atlantic salmon,” said Debbie Bouchard, director of the Aquaculture Research Institute. “From this scale of Petri dishes, we are now carrying out a complete study of the marine site.”

It all adds up to a great learning opportunity.

“During the year, we have around 20 students working here at different times. This is a great opportunity for them to learn lab skills etc. said Dill.

It’s a great resource for everyone in the state of Maine, not just students and faculty, but people who can use the results from this lab,” said Mills.

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Tackling more complex environmental issues than just reducing emissions: the farmer https://eco-label-tourism.com/tackling-more-complex-environmental-issues-than-just-reducing-emissions-the-farmer/ Sat, 20 Aug 2022 03:15:30 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/tackling-more-complex-environmental-issues-than-just-reducing-emissions-the-farmer/ An Australian farmer has urged the federal government to adopt a constructive and optimistic strategy on environmental issues, warning that oversimplified strategies can get results and never address the complexity of issues in the region. Mark Davie, head of the Beef Sustainability Australia trade group, told The Epoch Times that society and science should find […]]]>
An Australian farmer has urged the federal government to adopt a constructive and optimistic strategy on environmental issues, warning that oversimplified strategies can get results and never address the complexity of issues in the region.

Mark Davie, head of the Beef Sustainability Australia trade group, told The Epoch Times that society and science should find a solution that balances carbon reduction goals with the need to continue producing food for a growing international population. .

“I welcome initiatives that can reduce emissions while working in productivity drivers for commerce because we still need to feed people,” he said.

Whatever the need to feed people, ‘simple options’ such as cutting methane emissions will work in one respect, but at the expense of farmers and small businesses, as well as people’s livelihoods, warned David.

The Queensland grower called it a “low-hanging fruit strategy”, citing an example in Ireland where farmers were forced to reduce herd numbers to reduce emissions.

“[Given the fact that] People in other parts of the world are starving, I just wonder if that’s high ethical level in this situation.

Davie further warned that an overly simplified strategy could result in profitable options; for example, “We will be faced with a scenario where we now have large corporations offsetting their carbon emissions by planting bushes on farmland.”

The local weather debate in Australia recently took to the federal stage when the country of decline handed over a Climate Change Bill which set the target of reducing emissions by 43% by 2030 as the minimum standard.

However, the opposition and a few independents have expressed concern that the 14-page proposal lacks detail on how the goal might very well be achieved.

A name to focus more on options, not negativities

It follows the release of the State of the Atmosphere Report, which paints a dire scenario for Australia’s atmosphere and a deteriorating landscape and biodiversity.

“I have to admit – maybe I should have known – I didn’t know how far we were in collecting these environmental streams until we took over this portfolio,” the minister said. Environment Tanya Plibersek attacking former coalition leaders. July 18. .

“Alerts ignored or kept secret for years. Guarantees had been made but not fulfilled. “Bad habits, brutal budget cuts, willful negligence that undermines public belief,” he said.

Epoch Times Photo
Australian beef on display at a butcher shop in the Melbourne suburb of Yarraville on May 12, 2020. (WILLIAM WEST/AFP, Getty Photos)

However, Davie noted that some elements of the report “could rely on national coverage” and likely hurt the popularity of Australian farmers overseas “if they really do the right thing”.

“We will do this with our own measurements and reports,” Davie told The Epoch Times. “For those looking at the national accounts, we are back to 1990 forest cover levels… [also] It went from 50% good ground cover at the end of last September (at the end of the dry season) to now 78%”

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Experts in technology, management and solutions to environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/experts-in-technology-management-and-solutions-to-environmental-problems/ Sat, 13 Aug 2022 21:01:51 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/experts-in-technology-management-and-solutions-to-environmental-problems/ Earlier this year, O’Higgins established a company that provides environmental traceability services to public and private sector institutions. This is Ekuges, an organization made up of an interdisciplinary group of professionals in this field with more than 15 years of experience in their field. The three fundamental pillars underpin the work and the services they […]]]>

Earlier this year, O’Higgins established a company that provides environmental traceability services to public and private sector institutions. This is Ekuges, an organization made up of an interdisciplinary group of professionals in this field with more than 15 years of experience in their field.

The three fundamental pillars underpin the work and the services they provide. One of them is legal advice on environmental issues to ensure that institutions comply with all the regulations required in this area; In particular with regard to the law on extended producer responsibility (REP), the framework law on climate change and the Escazi Treaty, which are currently being validated and ratified in the country.

“The Escazzi treaty will be binding for everyone. Companies and the public world will be required to respect what was established there at the time of its entry into force in the country. For example, all in-house work in municipal policies will be prohibited and will need to be automatically renewed. This is where we are able to update the system and ensure there are no issues,” explained Debbie Lemus, who is at Acuse. Commercial director.

Lemus said it has “preventative software” for this, which, through artificial intelligence, provides companies with alerts about non-compliance they may have “both in regulations and internal processes”.

“It’s our second pillar, it’s the center and the spine from which everything emerges,” he said.

prevention of environmental problems

In Lemus’ words, the purpose of its business services is “to keep them from paying fines or getting in trouble with the law.” But something that stands above all is civil welfare and the prevention of environmental problems.

Thus, the third of the fundamental pillars of Ekuges concerns the resolution of socio-environmental conflicts in communities.

“When you manage to reduce environmental problems, you improve people’s quality of life. It’s about bringing communities closer to environmental justice,” said the company’s general manager, Sabina Alarcón.

“We have developed technologies that drive innovation in the public sector that will, for example, help municipalities establish guidelines to ensure environmental justice,” he explained.

An important fact is that Alarcon is one of the few people trained in the country and with the ranks to be able to certify environmental mediators. This is where Acuges points it out. Later this year, this company plans to have a seal that will allow them to certify other organizations that meet certain environmental characteristics.

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Turkish border wall causes serious environmental problems for Iran: senior official https://eco-label-tourism.com/turkish-border-wall-causes-serious-environmental-problems-for-iran-senior-official/ Thu, 11 Aug 2022 06:19:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/turkish-border-wall-causes-serious-environmental-problems-for-iran-senior-official/ A senior Iranian official has criticized Turkey for creating “serious” environmental problems by building a wall along the border between the two countries. In an interview with Iran’s al-Alam TV channel, Iranian Deputy Interior Minister Majid Mir Ahmadi said the wall being built along the Iranian border was part of a strategy designed by Turkey […]]]>

A senior Iranian official has criticized Turkey for creating “serious” environmental problems by building a wall along the border between the two countries.

In an interview with Iran’s al-Alam TV channel, Iranian Deputy Interior Minister Majid Mir Ahmadi said the wall being built along the Iranian border was part of a strategy designed by Turkey based on its own assessment of the threats it faced at the border. areas.

“We have had and will have no problems in this respect as long as our [country’s] the geographical and territorial limits are respected but [the border wall] has caused us serious environmental problems and has affected our rivers and our environment,” he added.

The official noted that Iran has briefed Turkish officials on environmental issues and is awaiting necessary reforms.

Construction of the 295 kilometer wall along the border with Iran is currently underway and is expected to be completed by 2023.

Ankara says the construction work aims to improve security by stopping the infiltration of Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) militants and “illegal smugglers”.

Some five million Afghan refugees live in Iran

The Interior Ministry official further said that some five million Afghan refugees are currently living in Iran, which is among the top hosts of refugees in the world.

Mir Ahmadi noted that Iran has plans to organize Afghan refugees and is currently working to implement them.

Iran has been facing a new wave of refugees from Afghanistan since the country fell under the control of the Taliban group in August.

Iran has criticized the lack of global financial support for refugees in Iran, saying funds provided by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) have not matched the size of the country’s refugee programs .

Authorities have warned that if sufficient support is not provided to deal with the refugees, the influx could reach countries in Europe.

“Border clashes with the Taliban must be settled”

Elsewhere in his interview, Mir Ahmadi said Taliban forces were unfamiliar with border guard duties and sometimes engaged in clashes with Iranian forces, stressing the importance of adopting measures to gradually resolve the problem.

Iran believes that Taliban forces are not seeking to get involved in a dispute with Iranian border guards and said it is ready to train Afghan forces in relevant tasks, he added.

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eNGOs present national solutions to reduce environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/engos-present-national-solutions-to-reduce-environmental-problems/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:51:06 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/engos-present-national-solutions-to-reduce-environmental-problems/ A coalition of local environmental NGOs have come up with a number of national solutions to tackle illegal landfills in Malta. The coalition is formed by Din l-Art Ħelwa Mellieħa, 7R, Nadur Nadif, Birżebbuġa Clean-up Group, No to Plastic Malta, Green Hats, Raniero’s Adventures, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq Clean-up Group and Green Waves. Throughout the document, NGOs […]]]>

A coalition of local environmental NGOs have come up with a number of national solutions to tackle illegal landfills in Malta.

The coalition is formed by Din l-Art Ħelwa Mellieħa, 7R, Nadur Nadif, Birżebbuġa Clean-up Group, No to Plastic Malta, Green Hats, Raniero’s Adventures, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq Clean-up Group and Green Waves.

Throughout the document, NGOs have highlighted a number of issues in Malta in three contexts; rural, urban and marine.

For all the problems that have been highlighted, thoughtful solutions have been provided, as a way to move forward towards a respected natural environment.

In addition to raising awareness of these issues, the coalition is also pushing for the reassessment of Malta’s environmental policies, as well as the implementation of new ones.

Here are some of the proposed solutions:

Environmental offenses

1. Have a centralized system served by a single line of contact (one stop shop) that encompasses all agencies and answers all questions. This could emulate the 112 emergency telephone line currently in place in Malta, which provides simultaneous access to all emergency services.

2. Continue to invest in a strong environmental policing force.

3. Create an environmental court, which would give more weight to decisions against environmental crimes than the court, which is currently in charge of environmental crimes.

4. Further improve the ‘Clean and Upkeep’ application by creating a link between the CMD and the Malta Police Force – EPU in investigating and fining the perpetrator responsible for environmental damage.

5. Launch an educational program on how to report environmental crimes.

Rural waste management

1. Set up a flexible schedule for emptying bins, with a schedule that respects the area in question, and that changes according to any planned mass event.

2. Ban the burning of waste on agricultural land as a form of waste management. It is suggested that the perpetrators be fined for the wider environmental damage caused.

Urban waste management

1. Update the law on condominiums with the aim of creating a system for better waste management in apartment buildings, which falls under this law.

2. To encourage a system of “best practices”, especially in practices regarding waste minimization and waste recycling in localities, it is suggested that authorities positively reinforce the desired behavior.

3. To further increase awareness, the Ministry of Environment could implement a strong nationwide publicity campaign to highlight environmental degradation.

Unnecessary waste

1. To limit unnecessary waste, such as plastic and/or laminated confetti, it is suggested that these items either be prohibited or those used must be made from recycled/organic materials.

2. To reduce spam, local councils should distribute a ‘No Spam’ label in their annual newsletter or be able to distribute these labels from their office.

3. To further reduce environmental damage, laminated/glossy print advertisements should be banned and a print or online alternative should be found.

4. Encourage reusable water bottles by introducing water refill stations, thereby encouraging the reduction of single-use plastic waste.

Marine litter management

1. To reduce the level of polystyrene pollution, polystyrene foam crates should be banned and replaced with cork/wooden crates.

2. To stop unnecessary marine litter, tires and plastic bottles/containers should be banned from use as fenders and buoys respectively.

3. To limit the problem of ghost nets, all nets should be chipped, and each missing net should be reported to authorities and collected.

Coastal waste management

1. Ensure that more cigarette bins are installed, especially on beaches and in any other tourist areas, and enforce these practices.

2. Ensure that paper/reusable cups are used in all events held near the coast (≈30m).

3. Encourage food outlets very close to the coast to switch to reusable utensils, containers and packaging, as well as reusable or paper cups, and thus lead to the creation of the “plastic-free beach”.

The coalition aims to support the implementation of these proposals at the national level, by first organizing meetings with the competent authorities.

The end goal of these efforts is to seek solutions for the reduction of waste that accumulates in the Maltese countryside, the marine environment as well as in urban infrastructure.

For more information, please contact the coalition by contacting a coalition group member or emailing [email protected]

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When Sasha (formerly known as Sasha Tas-Sigar) isn’t busy writing about environmental injustice, she’s likely fighting for women’s rights. Follow her @saaxhaa on Instagram and send her all things environment, art and women’s rights to [email protected]
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Why climate change is different from other environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/why-climate-change-is-different-from-other-environmental-issues/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 10:04:07 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/why-climate-change-is-different-from-other-environmental-issues/ Breadcrumb Links PF Comment It’s not politics, it’s economics Demonstrators hold signs and banners as they take part in a protest march arriving in Parliament Square, London, on July 23, 2022 to demand action against the cost of living crisis and the climate change crisis . Photo by NIKLAS HALLE’N/AFP via Getty Images Files Content […]]]>

It’s not politics, it’s economics

Content of the article

Twitter recently decided I needed to see an exchange between angry greens and devious conservatives that looked something like this. Smirking Conservative: The Greens have been telling us for decades to panic about overpopulation, acid rain, pollution, the ozone layer and now climate change. Yawn. Angry Greens: Yes, but that’s because we took action and solved all these problems, but now we’re ignoring the climate crisis because the good Tories who cared about it are all gone and now all we have is this are bad conservatives who hate the planet (and are stupid).

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Twitter is a factory of slogans, insults and low blows, but unfortunately it also seems that a lot of journalists form their opinions on things, so it is worth talking about. For context, as the above exchange unfolded, the news from Reuters was “Global coal-fired power generation in 2021 hits record high.”

Is it because stupid planet-hating conservatives are in charge everywhere? Barely.

The laws of the economy are in effect everywhere, which is why political leaders on all sides (including the Greens) are now ordering their coal-fired power plants to reopen and run at full capacity. They desperately need energy and the alternatives are much more expensive.

Regarding the Twitter feed, there are two questions to ask. First, do conservationists have a history of exaggeration, and second, why aren’t we stopping climate change even though we’ve tackled all these other issues? My answer to the first is yes: they are engaged in political advocacy and they use alarmism to get attention. The failed apocalyptic predictions of people like Paul Ehrlich and Al Gore have been documented elsewhere. I have written many times about how this impacts on the issue of climate change in terms of claims such as floods and storms, extreme weather, wildfires, economic growth, etc. The green movement has gotten a lot of political traction over the years. announcing the end of the world, but people are turning away from it now, for valid reasons.

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On the second issue, we don’t address climate change the way we did, say, acid rain because the costs and benefits of action are completely different. Simply put, for some of the earlier environmental problems there were emission control options that provided dramatic improvements at low cost. In the case of carbon dioxide, control options are expensive and accomplish little. Hence the difference.

Canada, like most industrialized countries, once had a problem with high levels of carbon monoxide (CO, not CO2) in our cities. In the mid-1970s, 84% of urban air quality readings in Canada violated health standards for carbon monoxide. But technology was developed (primarily catalytic converters for automobile tailpipes) that dramatically reduced emissions at low cost. Problem solved. As my colleague Elmira Aliakbari and I showed in a 2017 report published by the Fraser Institute, data from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) shows that ambient carbon monoxide levels have fallen by 90% from 1975 to 2015, and since 2011 no monitoring sites anywhere in the country have shown carbon monoxide violations. This happened despite economic growth of 240% and the tripling of the size of the vehicle fleet.

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The story is similar for sulfur dioxide, which is linked to acid rain, and fine particles, which contribute to smog. Technology in the form of stack scrubbers and process methods that remove sulfur at the refinery stage has significantly reduced both types of emissions. Eliminating lead from gasoline also eliminated lead from the air. Stratospheric ozone depletion was linked to the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). By the time the problem was discovered, relatively inexpensive substitutes were available, so CFCs were banned in 1987 under the Montreal Protocol.

Then, around 1988, the conversation turned to carbon dioxide and global warming. Despite some early hopes that a global treaty like the Montreal Protocol could work the same magic, it quickly became clear that the economics were very different. Carbon dioxide is closely related to the use of fossil fuels, but there are no scrubbers or catalytic converters capable of capturing it before releasing it. Large-scale global emission reductions would require large-scale global reductions in fossil energy uses for which there are no feasible alternatives. And even aggressive emissions cuts would barely affect global CO2 concentration for a century due to the size and slowness of the natural carbon cycle. Meanwhile, the socio-economic costs of warming, despite green alarmists, have proven small, especially compared to the benefits of energy-driven economic growth. Climate models have overestimated atmospheric warming for decades, while the IPCC (and many climatologists) have been arrested for using deliberately exaggerated emissions forecast scenarios.

This is why we have not yet, and probably never will, respond to the climate issue as we have to acid rain, urban smog, and other past environmental issues. The costs and benefits of feasible policy options differ. It’s not politics, it’s economics.

Ross McKitrick is Professor of Economics at the University of Guelph and Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute.

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‘Envirothon’ Challenges Students to Help Solve Environmental Problems | The mighty 790 KFGO https://eco-label-tourism.com/envirothon-challenges-students-to-help-solve-environmental-problems-the-mighty-790-kfgo/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 14:48:11 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/envirothon-challenges-students-to-help-solve-environmental-problems-the-mighty-790-kfgo/ BISMARCK, ND (KFGO/PRAIRIE PUBLIC) The North Dakota Department of Environmental Quality has awarded nearly $3 million in federal EPA grants to 11 pollution prevention projects. One of them is a statewide competition for high school students, called “Envirothon”. Andrea Petersen is the statewide coordinator for “Envirothon.” She said it’s a contest of natural resources. “Students […]]]>

BISMARCK, ND (KFGO/PRAIRIE PUBLIC) The North Dakota Department of Environmental Quality has awarded nearly $3 million in federal EPA grants to 11 pollution prevention projects.

One of them is a statewide competition for high school students, called “Envirothon”.

Andrea Petersen is the statewide coordinator for “Envirothon.” She said it’s a contest of natural resources.

“Students work in teams to solve questions related to soils, water, grasslands, forestry, wildlife, and then each year there is a current problem that students will take on the challenge of trying to solve. find an answer and that ties into something going on in the world right now,” Petersen said.

Petersen said “Envirothon” is a hands-on competition.

“It’s all outdoors, sampling water, texturing soils with their hands, identifying bird wings, listening to bird sounds,” Petersen said. “Last year in the state competition, they actually had to use a large logging saw and saw down a tree and then identify the tree rings. So it’s very convenient, very few questions are in a book.

Petersen said regional competitions take place before national finals. She said that this year, 14 teams from 10 schools participated.

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Ecologist recognized for his cutting-edge work on major environmental issues | Colorado Arts and Sciences Magazine https://eco-label-tourism.com/ecologist-recognized-for-his-cutting-edge-work-on-major-environmental-issues-colorado-arts-and-sciences-magazine/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/ecologist-recognized-for-his-cutting-edge-work-on-major-environmental-issues-colorado-arts-and-sciences-magazine/ CU Boulder Assistant Professor Laura E. Dee has been named an Ecological Society of America Early Career Fellow, reflecting her contributions so far and to come An interdisciplinary ecologist with a degree in economics has received high honor for her collaborative efforts to help solve big environmental problems. Laura E. Dee, Assistant Professor of Ecology […]]]>

CU Boulder Assistant Professor Laura E. Dee has been named an Ecological Society of America Early Career Fellow, reflecting her contributions so far and to come


An interdisciplinary ecologist with a degree in economics has received high honor for her collaborative efforts to help solve big environmental problems.

Laura E. Dee, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EBIO) at the University of Colorado at Boulder, was recently elected as an Early Career Fellow of the Ecological Society of America (ESA).

The society is a non-profit, non-partisan organization of professional environmentalists. He reserves the Early Career Award as a special recognition for ESA members “who have advanced ecological knowledge and applications and who promise to continue to make outstanding contributions to the wide range of fields served by ESA”.

Dee earned a Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2015. She recently answered questions about her work, its implications, and more. Parts of this exchange follow:

Question: You are an ecologist with a master’s degree in economics and you collaborate with other specialists in various disciplines; why is it important in your research to collaborate with other disciplines?

Answer: I think the biggest challenges facing society, such as climate change and biodiversity loss, require a multidisciplinary perspective. We cannot be siloed in our disciplines because the problems we face are not just a problem of biology, or not just a problem of sociology. They require a wide range of skills.

I think the biggest challenges facing society, like climate change and biodiversity loss, require a multidisciplinary perspective.

Much of my work involves collaborating across disciplines and working with different stakeholders and government agencies, as well as other scientists.

Q: Can you share an example of how this interdisciplinary collaboration happens?

A: I have worked with US Fish and Wildlife, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and the Nature Conservancy to understand and improve grassland conservation in the Upper Midwest. This group is a multi-agency collaboration that monitors and manages remnant grasslands across Minnesota and South Dakota. These are areas where native grasslands have declined significantly from their historic extent, but they are valuable habitats from a biodiversity perspective.

These areas have lost disturbances that were once part of the system, such as fire and grazing by large ungulates (like elk or bison), which are essential for these systems to maintain some of these native species, as invasive species take over otherwise. However, we don’t know much about how these ecosystems will respond to factors such as climate and management. Despite the uncertainty, conservation cannot wait for better information given the rate of climate change and the high potential for extinctions.

With this group, we are undergoing what is called “adaptive management”, or “learn-as-you-go” management to reduce uncertainty about how the prairies respond to things like climate and management. Through an iterative process of implementing grazing and prescribed burns, the group monitors the system to see what is happening, and we use this information to update our understanding and models to improve future management decisions. management.

My research group developed models for this team to better inform management decisions on their lands and to use data science to maximize what we can learn from over 10 years of monitoring data. As a group, we work with over 60 individual land managers through this partnership. Our lab group develops partnerships, so we can help with the science needed to inform management decisions, and then work with partners like these who connect with the people on the ground who are implementing measures like burning and grazing to maintain native grasslands.

At the top of the page: Bluestem, Minnesota tallgrass prairie plants (Justin Meissen/Flickr). Above: Laura Dee was recently elected ESA Early Career Fellow.

More locally, I work with the City of Boulder’s Climate Initiatives to collaboratively examine the potential effects of climate adaptation on the benefits people receive from nature.

For example, we (largely EBIO students Meghan Hayden and Rebecca McHugh) measure how vegetation, such as trees and pollinator corridors, impact Boulder’s urban heat island effect and how temperatures in the city differ according to the demography of the neighborhood, from the point of view of thermal inequality in the city.

We have air temperature sensors in parks, RV areas, and various neighborhoods in Boulder. We are also working with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, as they want to validate some of their satellite data with ground data in urban areas.

Q: Among other things, your lab aims to understand how ecosystems provide benefits to people, how global change alters these relationships, and how best to adapt conservation and response; it looks like we have a lot to learn in this area. Is this your view?

A: Yes. Let’s take fire as an example. Along with students and postdoctoral fellows in my group (Dr. Katherine Siegel and PhD student Anna LoPresti), I begin to work with fire scientists studying how climate change is altering fire regimes in the West. We are interested in how different management strategies, such as prescribed burning, can alter the severity of wildfires and minimize impacts on the benefits that people depend on forests.

Ultimately, what interests us is how fire and forest management alters the benefits people derive from a forest ecosystem. With our interdisciplinary approach, we can ask ourselves: what are the downstream consequences on the quality and quantity of water, and on the carbon stored? How might the cultural benefits we derive from forests change?

Q: Are there particular difficulties in working in several disciplines?

A: It’s a huge investment in building relationships and establishing a common language because people use different terms for the same thing or the same terms for different things.

Interdisciplinary work should be viewed as collaboration and an investment in relationships. There are a lot of pushes and pulls where you have to identify common interests, and a common problem that gives equal respect to what each discipline can bring to the table. To make these collaborations work, it’s not enough to approach someone and say, “Hey, I want you to like this challenge we’re working on.” You really want to work together to see a problem from different angles, so that everyone gets something out of it. Building that foundation takes time, but the product is often more innovative and transformative, and ultimately more useful outside of academia.

I am truly delighted to receive this award from ESA, as it signals to me that the standards of our field, and what can be defined as ecology, are changing to recognize the importance of interdisciplinary science.

Q: When did you know you wanted to be a scientist?

A: From an early age: I grew up on the East Coast and would go down to the beach and count the snails on the various piers. I had a failed snail relocation project where I thought the tides would kill the snails before I knew anything about their biology and moved them to the upper title area on the beach. Then they all died, so that was a big signal that I needed to learn a bit more about science. But from an early age, my mother introduced me to the natural history of coastal ecosystems. Although I am now in Colorado, I got my start in marine biology.

I am truly delighted to receive this award from ESA, as it signals to me that the standards of our field, and what can be defined as ecology, are changing to recognize the importance of interdisciplinary science.

Going back to some of the work we do in Boulder, I think the role of ecology in urban environments and cities could potentially create more connections to science for a broader set of people.

Q: What else are you working on?

A: Although I am based in Colorado, I also continue to do coastal research and have a grant from the National Science Foundation on the impacts of climate change and species loss in the Gulf of Maine. Specifically, blue mussels are in decline in the Gulf of Maine, but were once very abundant. The loss of the blue mussel could result in the loss of other species, as it serves as food and habitat for other species. The theory even predicts food web collapse and loss of critical ecosystem functions is possible. We test these predictions.

For this project, we combine hands-on field experience with tools from complex systems and network science to understand species losses in food webs. Food webs describe who eats whom in an ecosystem. With this approach, we want to understand the broader consequences of species extinctions due to climate change for rocky shore ecosystems, since species are connected by a complex web of interactions.

This project has been really fun and exciting, especially because it has established a new collaboration between CU Boulder and Colby College in Maine (Dr. Allison Barner) which has allowed us to involve and train many undergraduate students and graduate cycles.

To expand the reach and impact of this research, a PhD candidate in my lab, Aislyn Keyes, and I are developing an online game that will allow students anywhere in the world to learn about potential cascading consequences. species losses in rocky intertidal zones and salt marsh ecosystems for ecosystems and people.

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