Environmental problems – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 11:01:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png Environmental problems – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Nuclear fusion could solve our energy and environmental problems – Rimbey Review https://eco-label-tourism.com/nuclear-fusion-could-solve-our-energy-and-environmental-problems-rimbey-review/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 23:30:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/nuclear-fusion-could-solve-our-energy-and-environmental-problems-rimbey-review/ Nuclear fusion has long been a science fiction fantasy, the holy grail of power generation. But it is quickly approaching reality. The process involves combining several atomic nuclei to generate energy, just like the sun. It is the opposite of nuclear fission, in which atoms are divided. Canadian and British innovators are bringing this incredible […]]]>

Nuclear fusion has long been a science fiction fantasy, the holy grail of power generation. But it is quickly approaching reality.

The process involves combining several atomic nuclei to generate energy, just like the sun. It is the opposite of nuclear fission, in which atoms are divided.

Canadian and British innovators are bringing this incredible technology to life and in doing so could unite the warring factions of climate alarmists and climate skeptics.

The production of fusion energy requires less fuel than fission and this fuel is inexpensive. It is a long-term, sustainable source of energy, and the nuclear waste seen with typical nuclear fission power plants is not replicated with fusion power plants.

This technology offers an opportunity to finally stop building wind turbines on all natural sites and solar panels in countries that just don’t see as much sun.

And it could offer welcome relief from international climate alarmism and Extinction Rebellion extremism.

Nuclear fission today produces around 10% of the world’s energy. According to EUROfusion, a group of research organizations from European Union states, fusion reaction plants could supply about 10 percent more of the world’s energy needs. Over time, this number could increase dramatically.

After decades of experimentation, including breakthroughs in 2014 that allowed scientists to generate more energy than they used to create the reaction, researchers believe the technology is ready for the big hours. listen.

This summer, scientists in Los Angeles revealed how lasers the size of three football fields were used to generate enormous amounts of energy from nuclear fusion reactions. Some 200 laser beams were focused on a point to create an explosion of energy eight times the size of any experience in the past.

The UK – newly independent from the European Union – and Canada are leading the way in embracing fusion and preparing for this energy source of the future.

The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) launched a call for proposals for new sites for a prototype fusion power plant in December 2020, and Oxfordshire was selected this year. The plant will be used to prove the viability of a project by Canadian energy company General Fusion.

The factory and associated campus are expected to be completed in 2025 at an estimated cost of US $ 400 million. This is a significant investment but significantly lower than the ITER project of 20 billion euros which was many years behind schedule.

Canadian innovators plan to use mechanical pressure to contain the gigantic amount of heat and plasma generated during the smelting process, rather than the massive electromagnets that other factories are likely to experiment with. Mechanical pistons squeeze fuel from all sides, creating intense pressure that generates heat.

This could be a huge economic boost for the UK and Canada. Not only do nuclear fusion experiments create jobs – with research centers in 26 countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Korea and Japan – but these power plants offer long-term opportunities.

Far beyond the possibility of uniting climate skeptics and environmental activists around energy efficiency, fusion nuclear power plants could generate thousands, if not millions of jobs worldwide, in management and the maintenance of these plants to the logistics of fuel and waste and to the manufacture of the plants themselves.

It’s the kind of win-win scenario the world needs and another great example of how well an independent Britain can cooperate with Canada. It’s greener, cheaper, more efficient and could generate a lot of jobs. These are goals behind which alarmists and climate skeptics can surely unite as the world moves away from fossil fuels for “green” technology that clearly isn’t ready.

However, the possibility that nuclear fusion technology can unite factions in government, politics and society depends on the willingness of environmental activists to recognize that solar and wind power are simply not ready for hours. listening and that nuclear technology – even with its historical background – is the right solution.

The rejection of such potential by politicians or activists who influence politicians could boil down to the desire of environmental activists to perpetually protest.

Jack Buckby is Associate Researcher at the Frontier Center for Public Policy.


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Humans are on track to export our environmental problems to space https://eco-label-tourism.com/humans-are-on-track-to-export-our-environmental-problems-to-space/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/humans-are-on-track-to-export-our-environmental-problems-to-space/ To be clear, space is not exactly the Wild West. The 1967 Outer Space Treaty—The Magna Carta of Space Law — establishes a framework and key principles to guide responsible behavior in space. Negotiated and drafted during an era of the Cold War and heightened political tensions, the binding treaty largely addresses concerns of a […]]]>

To be clear, space is not exactly the Wild West. The 1967 Outer Space Treaty—The Magna Carta of Space Law — establishes a framework and key principles to guide responsible behavior in space. Negotiated and drafted during an era of the Cold War and heightened political tensions, the binding treaty largely addresses concerns of a time when the apocalypse was a far more imminent threat than space debris. On the one hand, it prohibits the deployment of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction in outer space. Four other international treaties dealing exclusively with outer space and related activities followed. These include the 1972 Liability Convention, which establishes who should be held responsible for damage caused by space objects, and the 1979 Lunar Accord, which attempts to prevent the commercial exploitation of space resources, such as mineral resources to establish lunar colonies.

Today, what has become mundane space activities (think plans to launch constellations of hundreds to tens of thousands of satellites or even ambitious proposals to extract resources from near-Earth asteroids) are subject to rules. established at a time when such activity fell within the realm of science fiction.

Space law documents are vague with respect to many of the scenarios that present themselves, and the Moon Accord has too few signatories to be effective. As a result, private space companies today can look at the half-century-old Outer Space Treaty and the four agreements that followed and reinterpret them in ways that favor their results, according to Jakhu. For example, efforts to extract asteroids have been supported by the argument that, according to the Outer Space Treaty, governments cannot extract and conserve an asteroid’s natural resources, but private companies can. (At best, the grandfather of space treaties does not provide a clear answer on the legality of asteroid mining.) Since private companies prioritize money, “the ground rules of l ‘outer space must be extended, strengthened and enforced’.

Efforts have been done to solve this problem. Regulatory bodies like the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and government, non-government and commercial space experts have come together to chop the building blocks of a new governance fill the current gaps in space law. In view of the intensification of space activities in recent years, UNOOSA has drafted widely accepted guidelines for debris mitigation and long term durability. (The guidelines suggest safe debris mitigation, disposal practices, and general good behavior, for example advising that all space objects be recorded and tracked and that 90% of them be removed from orbit. here the end of their mission.) These, like most efforts. to fill policy gaps in space law – are “soft rights” or a soft international instrument that no one is legally bound to abide by. Yet some countries, such as the United States, China and India, have incorporated standards of international legal principles of conduct in space into their national laws for the licensing of space activities.

Multinational initiatives led by individual space countries, such as the recent US-sponsored project Artemis chords, signal an alternative route. Named after NASA’s Human Spaceflight Program to the Moon, these are general guidelines that nations should follow when exploring the Moon, including being peaceful, working together, and leaving no trash. Yet the agreements have yet to be signed by key US allies and space partners, such as Germany and France. Meanwhile, a concrete path to an international agreement may soon emerge. During the first week of November, representatives from the United Kingdom proposed that the United Nations organize a task force – the first step in treaty negotiations – to develop new standards of international behavior beyond Earth.


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Nuclear fusion can solve our energy and environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/nuclear-fusion-can-solve-our-energy-and-environmental-problems/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 15:04:27 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/nuclear-fusion-can-solve-our-energy-and-environmental-problems/ Reading time: 3 minutes Nuclear fusion has long been a science fiction fantasy, the holy grail of power generation. But it is quickly approaching reality. The process involves combining several atomic nuclei to generate energy, just like the sun does. It is the opposite of nuclear fission, in which atoms are divided. Canadian and British […]]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes

Nuclear fusion has long been a science fiction fantasy, the holy grail of power generation. But it is quickly approaching reality.

The process involves combining several atomic nuclei to generate energy, just like the sun does. It is the opposite of nuclear fission, in which atoms are divided.

Canadian and British innovators are bringing this incredible technology to life and in so doing could unite the warring factions of climate alarmists and skeptics.

The production of fusion energy requires less fuel than fission and this fuel is inexpensive. It is a long-term, sustainable source of energy, and the nuclear waste seen with typical nuclear fission power plants is not replicated with fusion power plants.

This technology offers an opportunity to finally stop building wind turbines on all natural sites and solar panels in countries that just don’t see as much sun.

And it could offer welcome relief from international climate alarmism and Extinction Rebellion extremism.

Nuclear fission today produces around 10% of the world’s energy. According to EUROfusion, a group of research organizations from European Union states, fusion reaction plants could provide about 10% more global energy needs. Over time, this number could increase dramatically.

After decades of experimentation, including breakthroughs in 2014 that allowed scientists to generate more energy than they used to create the reaction, researchers believe the technology is ready for prime time .

Click here to downloadThis summer, scientists in Los Angeles revealed how lasers as large as three football fields were used to generate enormous amounts of energy from nuclear fusion reactions. Some 200 laser beams were focused on a point to create an explosion of energy eight times the size of any experience in the past.

The UK – newly independent from the European Union – and Canada are leading the way in embracing fusion and preparing for this energy source of the future.

The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) launched a call for proposals for new sites for a prototype fusion power plant in December 2020, and Oxfordshire was selected this year. The plant will be used to prove the viability of a project of a Canadian energy company General merger.

The factory and associated campus are expected to be completed in 2025 at an estimated cost of US $ 400 million. This is a significant investment, but much lower than the 20 billion ITER project which is several years late.

Canadian innovators plan to use mechanical pressure to contain the gigantic amount of heat and plasma generated during the smelting process, rather than the massive electromagnets other factories are likely to experiment with. Mechanical pistons squeeze fuel from all sides, creating intense pressure that generates heat.

This could be a huge economic boost for the UK and Canada. Not only do nuclear fusion experiments create jobs – with research centers in 26 countries, including the United States, United Kingdom, Korea and Japan – but these power plants offer long-term opportunities.

Far beyond the possibility of uniting climate-skeptics and environmental activists around energy efficiency, fusion nuclear power plants could generate thousands, if not millions of jobs worldwide, in management and development. the maintenance of these plants to the logistics of fuel and waste and to the manufacture of the plants themselves.

It’s the kind of win-win scenario the world needs and another great example of how well an independent Britain can cooperate with Canada. It’s greener, cheaper, more efficient and could generate a lot of jobs. These are goals behind which alarmists and climate skeptics can surely unite as the world moves away from fossil fuels for “green” technology that clearly isn’t ready.

However, the possibility that nuclear fusion technology can unite factions in government, politics and society depends on the willingness of environmental activists to recognize that solar and wind power are simply not ready for hours. listening and that nuclear technology – even with its historical background – is the right solution.

The rejection of such potential by politicians or activists who influence politicians could boil down to the desire of environmental activists to perpetually protest.

Jack Buckby is Associate Researcher at the Frontier Center for Public Policy.

Jack is a Troy Media Opinion leader. For interview requests, Click here.


The views, opinions and positions expressed by columnists and contributors are the only authors. They do not inherently or expressly reflect the views, opinions and / or positions of our post.

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Jack Buckby

Jack Buckby is a research associate at the Frontier Center for Public Policy and a British author and researcher, with experience working in the English, American, Canadian and Polish media.

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Manatees die at record rate as environmental problems increase https://eco-label-tourism.com/manatees-die-at-record-rate-as-environmental-problems-increase/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/manatees-die-at-record-rate-as-environmental-problems-increase/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/manatees-die-at-record-rate-as-environmental-problems-increase/ STUART, Florida – Jim Moir’s back dock in Stuart is near the intersection of the St. Lucia River and Indian River Lagoon. It’s a beautiful sight, at first glance. The longtime advocate of marine conservation knows full well that beneath the surface there are ever-growing problems. Concrete example, a record mortality of manatees this year. […]]]>

STUART, Florida – Jim Moir’s back dock in Stuart is near the intersection of the St. Lucia River and Indian River Lagoon. It’s a beautiful sight, at first glance. The longtime advocate of marine conservation knows full well that beneath the surface there are ever-growing problems. Concrete example, a record mortality of manatees this year.

“The devastation was an event of famine, these animals starved for almost 10 years,” Moir said.

The figures are astounding. More than 900 manatee deaths recorded so far this year in Florida.

Moir said two of those three deaths occurred in the Indian River Lagoon. One main reason is the loss of seagrass. Seagrass beds serve as food for manatees, and Moir said they have long been lost, and especially in the past decade due to pollution. Without it, gentle creatures are deeply endangered.

“The famine was somewhat inevitable because humans didn’t notice the pollution from the nutrients we dump into our estuaries,” Moir told me.

The runoff of ranch and farm manure in the water that has long swept east of Lake Okeechobee is a culprit. The same goes for urban and suburban runoff and septic tank leaks. The list is long. The result of all this nutrient-rich runoff is a supercharged algal bloom that cuts through the light seagrass beds they need to thrive.

“It has,” Moir said of the estuary and lagoon, “a dominant seagrass ecology, and now we can see a dominant macroalgae ecology.”

Moir said that in recent years there were signs of improving water quality, but habitat recovery, he said, is not happening. He argues that there is a need for living shorelines rich in vegetation and a focus on more comprehensive wastewater management.

“Our (human) ability to survive as a dominant species depends on the resilience of the ecosystem we live in, and the diversity of the ecosystem is responsible for its resilience,” he added.

Sizeable challenges and Moir is committed to continuing, for the beloved and endangered manatees, for all of us. “I’m a father too,” Moir tells me, “and I have to give him a better place. That’s why I keep doing what I do.”


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Serbs protest lithium mining and other environmental issues, Energy News, ET EnergyWorld https://eco-label-tourism.com/serbs-protest-lithium-mining-and-other-environmental-issues-energy-news-et-energyworld/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/serbs-protest-lithium-mining-and-other-environmental-issues-energy-news-et-energyworld/#respond Sun, 12 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/serbs-protest-lithium-mining-and-other-environmental-issues-energy-news-et-energyworld/ People attend a demonstration against pollution and the exploitation of a lithium mine in the west of the country, in Belgrade, Serbia, on Saturday September 11, 2021. Hundreds of activists gathered to protest against the operation of a lithium mine by the international company Rio Tinto. (AP Photo / Darko Vojinovic) BELGRADE, Serbia: Several thousand […]]]>
People attend a demonstration against pollution and the exploitation of a lithium mine in the west of the country, in Belgrade, Serbia, on Saturday September 11, 2021. Hundreds of activists gathered to protest against the operation of a lithium mine by the international company Rio Tinto. (AP Photo / Darko Vojinovic)

BELGRADE, Serbia: Several thousand people demonstrated in Serbia on Saturday to demand a ban on lithium mining in the Balkan country as well as a resolution of many other environmental problems that have made the region one of the most polluted in Europe.

The rally in downtown Belgrade was organized by some 30 environmental groups who have recently gained popularity in Serbia amid widespread disillusionment with mainstream politicians and amid the major pollution problems facing the region is facing.

Protesters held banners demanding protection of Serbia’s rivers, nature and air which they said have been endangered by for-profit government policies and decades of neglect.

Protesters then blocked one of the capital’s main bridges for a while as they announced several more blockades across the rest of the country in the coming months.

More than 100,000 people have signed a petition against international mining company Rio Tinto, which has sought to build a lithium mine in the west of the country rich in ore used in the production of electric car batteries.

“Our demand is that the government of Serbia rescind all obligations to Rio Tinto,” said Aleksandar Jovanovic, one of the organizers. “We have come together to say no to those who offer concentrated sulfuric acid in place of raspberries and honey.”

A number of experts have warned that nature in western Serbia will suffer if lithium is exploited in the region rich in fertile land and agriculture. Serbia has also faced huge pollution problems caused by coal-fired power plants run by Chinese companies.

In addition to mining, Serbia faces growing problems, including poor waste management and high air pollution caused by the use of low-quality coal and other pollutants. Rivers have been polluted with toxic industrial waste and many cities, including Belgrade, do not have good sewage and sewage systems.

“We were thirsty this summer, we are breathing toxic air and the land is being sold,” protest organizers said in a statement. “The forests are cut and the mines are spreading.”

The Balkan countries must significantly improve their environmental protection policies if they are to move forward in their application for EU27 membership. Impoverished and corrupted after years of war in the In the 1990s, many Balkan countries put environmental issues in the background.

Rio Tinto has committed $ 2.4 billion to the project in Serbia, which would make it one of the world’s largest lithium producers amid growing demand for electric cars.


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AI energy consumption poses environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/ai-energy-consumption-poses-environmental-problems/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/ai-energy-consumption-poses-environmental-problems/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 17:37:30 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/ai-energy-consumption-poses-environmental-problems/ Training an advanced AI model takes time, money, and high-quality data. It also takes energy – a lot. Between storing data in large-scale data centers and using that data to train a machine learning or deep learning model, the power consumption of AI is high. While an AI system can pay off, AI poses an […]]]>

Training an advanced AI model takes time, money, and high-quality data. It also takes energy – a lot.

Between storing data in large-scale data centers and using that data to train a machine learning or deep learning model, the power consumption of AI is high. While an AI system can pay off, AI poses an environmental problem.

AI energy consumption during training

Take for example some of the most popular language models.

OpenAI trained its GPT-3 model on 45 terabytes of data. To form the final version of MegatronLM, a similar language model but smaller than GPT-3, Nvidia ran 512 V100 GPUs over nine days.

A single V100 GPU can consume between 250 and 300 watts. If we assume 250 watts, then 512 V100 GPUs consume 128,000 watts, or 128 kilowatts (kW). Running for nine days means training the MegatronLM cost 27,648 kilowatt hours (kWh).

The average household uses 10,649 kWh per year, according to the US Energy Information Administration. Therefore, forming the final version of MegatronLM used almost the amount of energy used by three households in one year.

New training techniques reduce the amount of data needed to train machine learning and deep learning models, but many models still need a huge amount of data to complete an initial training phase and additional data to stay up to date.

Data center power consumption

As AI becomes more complex, expect some models to use even more data. This is a problem, because data centers use an incredible amount of energy.

“Data centers are going to be one of the most impacting things on the environment,” said Alan Pelz-Sharpe, founder of the analysis firm Deep Analysis.

AI has many benefits for businesses, but it creates problems for the environment.

IBM’s weather company processes approximately 400 terabytes of data per day to enable its models to predict weather days in advance around the world. Facebook generates approximately 4 petabytes (4000 terabytes) of data per day.

People generated 64.2 zettabytes of data in 2020. That’s about 58,389,559,853 terabytes, estimated market research firm IDC.

Data centers store this data all over the world.

Meanwhile, the largest data centers require more than 100 megawatts of electrical capacity, which is enough to power some 80,000 American homes, depending on energy and climate. think tank Energy innovation.

With about 600 hyperscale data centers – data centers that exceed 5,000 servers and 10,000 square feet – around the world, it’s not clear how much power is needed to store all of our data, but the number is probably staggering.

From an environmental perspective, the energy consumption of data centers and AI is also a nightmare.

Google data center
A Google data center in Douglas County, Georgia.

AI, data and environment

The use of energy creates CO2, the main greenhouse gas emitted by humans. In the atmosphere, greenhouse gases like CO2 trap heat near the Earth’s surface, causing the Earth’s temperature to rise and disrupting delicate ecosystems.

“We have an energy consumption crisis,” said Gerry McGovern, author of the book Waste in the world.

AI is energy intensive, and the higher the demand for AI, the more energy we use, he said.

“It’s not just electrical energy to train AI,” he said. “It builds the supercomputers. It collects and stores data.”

McGovern pointed to estimates that by 2035 humans will have produced more than 2,000 zettabytes of data.

Data centers are going to be one of the most impacting things on the environment.

Alan pelz sharpeFounder, Deep Analysis

“The storage energy required for this will be astronomical,” he said.

Currently, the heaviest users of data are not doing much about the carbon footprint or the problem of AI power consumption.

“I am aware of a certain recognition [of AI’s carbon footprint problem] but not a lot of action, “said McGovern.” Data centers, which are the ‘food source’ for AI, have focused on electrical efficiency and have certainly made major improvements over the past 10 years. last years.”

While data centers have become more electrically efficient over the past decade, experts estimate that electricity accounts for only about 10% of a data center’s CO2 emissions, McGovern said. The infrastructure of a data center, including the building and cooling systems, also produces a lot of CO2.

On top of that, data centers also use a lot of water as a form of evaporative cooling. This cooling method reduces electricity consumption, but can use millions of gallons of water per day per hyperscale data center. Additionally, the water used can become polluted in the process, McGovern noted.

“There is always this broad assumption that digital is inherently green, and it is far from it,” he said.

Environmental impact of companies

While the average business cannot change the way large companies store their data, companies that care about their environmental footprint can focus on high quality creation, rather than large amounts of data. For example, they can delete data that they no longer use; companies tend not to use 90% of data 90 days after it is stored, according to McGovern.

Businesses can also adjust the way they use AI or the type of AI they use.

Organizations can think about the specific use case they want to accomplish and choose an AI or automation technology dedicated to that use case. However, different types of AI have additional AI power consumption costs.

Businesses can get carried away with the idea that they need an advanced deep learning system that can do it all, Pelz-Sharpe said. However, if they want to tackle a targeted use case, like automating an invoicing process, they don’t need an advanced system. These systems are expensive and use a lot of data, which means they have a high carbon footprint.

A dedicated system will have been trained on a much smaller amount of data while probably completing a specific use case as well as a more general system.

“Because it is highly specialized, the AI ​​has been trained on the most precise data possible” while keeping a small set of data, Pelz-Sharpe said. A deep learning model, on the other hand, has to process huge amounts of data to achieve anything.

“In all of our decisions, we must take into account the experience of the land,” said McGovern.


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Dr Kevin Sabet: Cannabis industry causes ‘huge’ environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/dr-kevin-sabet-cannabis-industry-causes-huge-environmental-problems/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/dr-kevin-sabet-cannabis-industry-causes-huge-environmental-problems/#respond Fri, 13 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/dr-kevin-sabet-cannabis-industry-causes-huge-environmental-problems/ Smart Approaches to Marijuana CEO Dr Kevin Sabet told “Fox & Friends” on Friday that the cannabis industry is a “huge problem” for the environment when it comes to water and cannabis use. electricity. Sabet reacted to a Politics report denouncing the “inconvenient truth” about carbon emissions from the cannabis industry. POLICE NO LONGER SEIZE […]]]>

Smart Approaches to Marijuana CEO Dr Kevin Sabet told “Fox & Friends” on Friday that the cannabis industry is a “huge problem” for the environment when it comes to water and cannabis use. electricity. Sabet reacted to a Politics report denouncing the “inconvenient truth” about carbon emissions from the cannabis industry.

POLICE NO LONGER SEIZE MARIJUANA AT NEW YORK AIRPORTS

KEVIN SABET: It affects him tremendously. First of all, marijuana is an extremely thirsty plant. It takes extreme amounts of water inside and out. Outdoors about twice as much indoors to grow it. We are seeing major water depletion in states like California that are already struggling with water issues. And by the way, this happens both in the legal growth of the state, but also in the illegal growth of the state. It is not just an illegal problem.

We see a huge consumption of electricity. The marijuana industry uses essentially the same amount of electricity as the computer industry – as home computers. Anyone who owns a home computer or laptop and uses it in the home or apartment. It’s more than cars and energyefficient cars. It’s like running your dishwasher three times a day. This is a big, big problem.

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Heavy burden of environmental problems on the Caspian Sea https://eco-label-tourism.com/heavy-burden-of-environmental-problems-on-the-caspian-sea/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/heavy-burden-of-environmental-problems-on-the-caspian-sea/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/heavy-burden-of-environmental-problems-on-the-caspian-sea/ TEHRAN – As we celebrate National Caspian Sea Day every year, the precious body of water is still struggling with environmental issues such as oil pollutants, sewage and leakage of petroleum products from coastal countries. Caspian Sea Day is held annually on August 12, with the aim of raising awareness of the environmental ramifications of […]]]>

TEHRAN – As we celebrate National Caspian Sea Day every year, the precious body of water is still struggling with environmental issues such as oil pollutants, sewage and leakage of petroleum products from coastal countries.

Caspian Sea Day is held annually on August 12, with the aim of raising awareness of the environmental ramifications of human interference with this precious ecosystem.

The day marks the Framework Convention, also known as the Tehran Convention, signed by the official representatives of the five Caspian coastal states, namely Azerbaijan, Iran, Kazakhstan, the Russian Federation and Turkmenistan in Tehran on November 4, 2003.

The Caspian Sea is the largest enclosed body of inland water on Earth by area. It is bounded by Kazakhstan to the northeast, Russia to the northwest, Azerbaijan to the west, Iran to the south and Turkmenistan to the southeast. The sea has an area of ​​600,384 square kilometers and a coastline of 7,000 kilometers.

Home to 400 aquatic species and holding the third place in terms of oil and gas reserves under its bed after the “Persian Gulf” and “Siberia” has doubled the value of this basin, while sturgeons are the most important inhabitants Lake.

Researchers believe that 80% of the pollution of the Caspian Sea is related to the flow of water from the Volga and other western rivers of the Republic of Azerbaijan.

The frequent oil spills in the coastal areas of Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan, the entry of waste from more than 40 factories and refineries into the sea, the decline and extinction of aquatic species in the Caspian Sea since 1990, are among the main challenges facing the Caspian Sea. .

The National Institute of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences has conducted extensive studies in this watershed, including more than 10 research patrols in the Caspian Sea, certification and establishment of ” a trusted laboratory of the Ministry of the Environment, identifying high-risk points for breaking waves on the shores of the sea.

In addition, the sampling of bed sediments in the deep waters of the southern Caspian basin, the publication of over 80 scientific papers on the Caspian Sea, the study, measurement and modeling in Gorgan Bay and the presentation of scientific and executive solutions for the sustainability of its ecosystem and more than 70 research projects in the southern part of the Caspian Sea are other actions of the researchers of the Research Institute.

Dealing with poor waste management

Ahmad Reza Lahijanzadeh, deputy head of the Department of the Environment (DOE) for the marine environment, said in August 2020 that waste management in the Caspian Sea is on the brink of crisis and seriously threatens the sea environment. .

In addition to waste, leachate enters the sea through rivers or precipitation, and because the severity of leachate pollution is very high, it poses a serious threat to the marine environment, he said. lamented.

Noting that the discharge of urban and rural wastewater into the sea is another problem that the Caspian Sea is grappling with, he clarified that a number of towns in the northern provinces also do not have a plant. wastewater treatment.

Stating that plastics and microplastics are among the issues that may threaten humanity over the next 10 years, he noted that erosion makes microplastics from plastic waste, and 70 percent of them they are transferred directly to the seas, and can therefore enter the aquatic and human food cycle, causing damage to human health and marine biodiversity.

The Caspian Sea will be smaller in the future

Over the past 25 years, the water level in the Caspian Sea has fallen by 130cm, he said, noting that whether this drop will stop in the future is a matter of controversy, but given climate change and increased water consumption in the Volga. , the main source of water for the Caspian Sea, many believe that the water level will continue to drop and the Caspian Sea will be smaller in the future.

The water level of the Caspian Sea has reached its lowest level since 1995, mainly due to a recent drop in the water level of the Volga, which provides most of the sea water, d ‘about 22%.

In 2019, the average water level was -27.18 meters, a decrease of 13 centimeters from the previous year.

According to the National Center for Studies and Research on the Caspian Sea affiliated with the Water Research Institute, sea water temperature is one of the main criteria of heat exchange and an indicator to assess the evaporation potential of the water level, which is one of the main components of the water balance of the Caspian Sea.

The rising trend in the surface temperature of the Caspian Sea, especially in recent years, has been one of the factors affecting the reduction in water level.

FB / MG


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Charles challenges students to design solutions to environmental problems https://eco-label-tourism.com/charles-challenges-students-to-design-solutions-to-environmental-problems/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/charles-challenges-students-to-design-solutions-to-environmental-problems/#respond Sat, 24 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/charles-challenges-students-to-design-solutions-to-environmental-problems/ T he Prince of Wales and design guru Sir Jony Ive have joined forces to encourage students to create high impact, low cost solutions to help the global transition to a sustainable future. Students at the Royal College of Art (RCA) have taken on the challenge of designing projects, as part of the Terra Carta […]]]>
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he Prince of Wales and design guru Sir Jony Ive have joined forces to encourage students to create high impact, low cost solutions to help the global transition to a sustainable future.

Students at the Royal College of Art (RCA) have taken on the challenge of designing projects, as part of the Terra Carta Design Lab initiative, that tackle environmental damage to the planet.

Charles, who has an official role with RCA as a Royal Visitor, said: “Small ideas can have a big impact if backed up by the right design, science and engineering and that’s the idea. key behind today’s Terra Carta Design Lab.

Charles, pictured releasing a turtle into the sea in Malta, is a longtime conservationist (Steve Parsons / PA) / AP Archives

“We only have 100 days before Cop26, the major United Nations conference in Glasgow to tackle the climate and biodiversity crisis, and we will all have to play our part, young and old, if we want to change the how we take care of the Earth by making it sustainable for nature, people and the planet.

The Terra Carta Design Lab developed from Charles’s Terra Carta or Earth Charter project, an ambitious Magna Carta-style charter to encourage the private sector to protect the planet by embracing sustainability and investing $ 10 billion (7.3 billion pounds) into ‘natural capital’.

Sir Jony, credited with designing some of the modern era’s most beloved gadgets including Apple’s iPhone, iPod and iPad, designed the layout of the charter document.

The industrial, product and architectural designer, who is the Chancellor of RCA, said of the design lab: “This is a visionary and imaginative way to help solve the world’s increasingly pressing environmental problems.

“Often times the biggest challenges require the most resourceful and creative thinking, which is why I am so excited about the work that RCA students will be able to contribute through this collaboration.

“I know their creativity and inventiveness will develop truly powerful solutions. “

Jony Ive has been named a knight for his work in design (Rebecca Naden / PA) / AP Archives

Former RCA students are already working to create solutions to environmental problems, with graduates involved in the Tire Collective, which has developed a device to capture microplastic particles from tires as they are emitted.

Another project is Zelp (Zero Emissions Livestock Project), which has created an innovative device worn by livestock that neutralizes methane exhalations from livestock at the source.


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Tomorrow was late: Nur-Sultan hosts book presentation on environmental issues https://eco-label-tourism.com/tomorrow-was-late-nur-sultan-hosts-book-presentation-on-environmental-issues/ https://eco-label-tourism.com/tomorrow-was-late-nur-sultan-hosts-book-presentation-on-environmental-issues/#respond Sun, 20 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/tomorrow-was-late-nur-sultan-hosts-book-presentation-on-environmental-issues/ NUR-SULTAN – The Kazakh capital hosted the presentation of the book Tomorrow Was Late: Environmental Risks of Kazakhstan on June 17, bringing together, virtually and physically, representatives of government and international organizations to participate in the event. Book cover. The environment concerns us all. Kazakhstan was among the first countries in the post-Soviet space to […]]]>

NUR-SULTAN – The Kazakh capital hosted the presentation of the book Tomorrow Was Late: Environmental Risks of Kazakhstan on June 17, bringing together, virtually and physically, representatives of government and international organizations to participate in the event.

Book cover.

The environment concerns us all. Kazakhstan was among the first countries in the post-Soviet space to implement the idea of ​​a green economy and promote significant changes in ecology. But environmental issues are becoming increasingly urgent and complex as countries strive for sustainable development.

The book covers several important topics – water resource management, air pollution, waste management, land degradation, biodiversity, energy resource efficiency and climate change – with a common goal of show the direct and indirect links between environmental threats and risks in Kazakhstan. The authors of the book also hoped that it could serve as a set of recommendations for policymakers and NGOs to prevent or mitigate environmental threats.

In his opening remarks, Zulfahar Zholdashov, head of the Department of Ecological Regulation and Control at the Kazakh Ministry of Ecology, Geology and Natural Resources, touched on some of the main issues the government is trying to address, including air quality, water pollution and waste management.

“We are monitoring our big cities and ten cities are among the most polluted – Nur-Sultan, Almaty and our industrial cities Temirtau, Balhash, Ust-Kamenogorsk,” he said.

He also explained how the new Environmental Code, which is expected to come into force on July 1, can help address these issues, including through the introduction of new technologies. According to the new environmental code, the 50 largest companies, which account for 80% of emissions in Kazakhstan, will replace their old technology with the best available technologies by 2025.

Participants agreed that addressing environmental issues requires a multisectoral approach from both government and NGOs.

Climate change

Climate change is also among the issues that need to be addressed, said Vadim Nee, an environmental expert addressing the panel session.

“Anthropogenic factors are causing climate change and we need to review Kazakhstan’s contribution,” he said, noting that the volume of emissions is increasing and has exceeded the 1990 level.

He said that by 2030, the temperature could rise by two degrees Celsius and cause an increase in water flows in June and May and a decrease in flows in July and August when water is needed for irrigation.

“What we get is that key sectors will be at risk, those that play an important role in economic growth like agriculture,” he said.

He said that Kazakhstan has taken important steps in this area, but there is still a lot to do. People should also switch to a low carbon lifestyle, because “the temperature will rise and we will not be able to change anything in the near future, so we have to change our life and adapt to the economy,” he said. -he declares.

Energy sector

Despite the negative effects associated with problems in the energy sector, it remains crucial for the economy, said Alexey Kobzev, head of renewable energy projects at the German Kazakh University.

“The energy sector is the bloodstream of the country and the economy,” Kobzev said.

Among the problems to be resolved in the sector are the dilapidated heating and electricity networks, 43% of the heating networks being worn out.

“The electricity network is also suffering losses, nearly 14% of the electricity is lost,” he added.

Kobzev notes that a 3% share of renewable energies in the total energy balance was achieved in 2020.

The use of computer technologies could help Kazakhstan in this effort.

“A target of six percent by 2025 is very realistic, but that includes stimulating maneuvering capabilities and creating market mechanisms,” he said.

The project was implemented by the Dosym Satpayev Foundation in partnership with the Kazakh-German University and with the support of the OSCE Program Office in Nur-Sultan, the Friedrich Ebert Foundation in Kazakhstan and the eco -living Asia magazine.


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