environmental protection – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 07:30:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://eco-label-tourism.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-23-120x120.png environmental protection – Eco Label Tourism http://eco-label-tourism.com/ 32 32 Environmental issues are back in Richmond https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-are-back-in-richmond/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 14:47:22 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-are-back-in-richmond/ Posted on Sunday, March 6, 2022 at 9:45 a.m. Join the 100,000 AFP subscribers on Facebook Buy an AFP subscription Subscribe to AFP podcasts on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Pandora News, press releases, letters to the editor: augustafreepress2@gmail.com Advertising inquiries: freepress@ntelos.net (© cbies – stock.adobe.com) Even with growing evidence of climate change, there is a […]]]>
Virginia
(© cbies – stock.adobe.com)

Even with growing evidence of climate change, there is a paucity of bills in this session of the General Assembly addressing environmental and climate change. Of more concern is the fact that of the bills that could be classified as environment-related, most would roll back current laws, programs and regulations in place to protect the environment. Virginia hasn’t earned its top spot as a business-friendly state because of its tough environmental regulations, but its already minimal laws and programs are under attack from those who oppose government action to keep our clean environment and stop climate change.

Evidence of environmental policy change emerged earlier this year when new Governor Glenn Youngkin announced his opposition to Virginia’s participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), an 11-state effort to cap and reduce emissions. of CO2 from mains electricity. CO2 is the main culprit for the warming of the earth which leads to climate change and the bizarre changes in weather and air quality. Most surprising of this policy change is the fact that RGGI is a cooperative, market-based approach supported by many industry players to cap and reduce CO2 emissions in the northeast region of the country without the need for regulations. governmental.

Another concerning piece of evidence of a shift in policy came with the new governor appointing a former Trump administration official known for his opposition to environmental protection regulations as secretary of natural and historic resources. A review of the nominee’s credentials raised such concern among lawmakers that the Senate declined to confirm the nomination, only the second such refusal in the decades-long history of the Virginia cabinet system.

More recently, two bills made their way through the General Assembly that would strip Citizens’ Councils of their power and responsibility to protect air and water quality. The impetus for the bills came from businesses and industries that felt it was too time-consuming and complex to obtain the air or water permits needed to locate their industries in Virginia. More recently, there has been a lot of controversy and lawsuits over pipelines that proposed to go through Virginia. These affected industries blamed the complexity of the regulatory process on the need for scientific evidence and public participation that raised questions about their plans at the State Water Control Board and the State Air Board. Bills making their way through the legislature and no doubt having to be signed by the governor would strip the councils of their power.

I took a strong stand against the changes to the Air and Water Commissions. My speech against the House of Delegates floor bills can be heard at youtu.be/UaAytHE-o_s, and an article I wrote with Del. Kathy Tran and an expert on the subject is available in The Washington Post at www. washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/02/23/efforts-silence-virginias-citizens-boards-commissions-are-wrong/.

Current policies being implemented in Virginia can cause immeasurable harm to the Commonwealth’s already fragile environment.

Ken Plum is a member of the Virginia House of Delegates.

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5 environmental issues to watch in Connecticut’s legislative session https://eco-label-tourism.com/5-environmental-issues-to-watch-in-connecticuts-legislative-session/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/5-environmental-issues-to-watch-in-connecticuts-legislative-session/ That effort, the Transportation Climate Initiative, is not on Lamont’s agenda this year as lawmakers begin a short legislative session that will last until May 4. Despite the short time frame for action on the state budget and a few other important items such as crime and health care reform, lawmakers and lobbyists who deal […]]]>

That effort, the Transportation Climate Initiative, is not on Lamont’s agenda this year as lawmakers begin a short legislative session that will last until May 4.

Despite the short time frame for action on the state budget and a few other important items such as crime and health care reform, lawmakers and lobbyists who deal with environmental issues say they are preparing to do push aggressively for a short list of policies this year. At the top of their list are things like reducing truck emissions and new regulations to reduce the waste filling the state’s landfills and incinerators.

“Climate and waste are the two big areas our lawmakers need to take seriously this session,” said Lori Brown, executive director of the Connecticut League of Conservation Voters. “We were really upset that not enough was done on the climate last year.”

Brown pointed to the planned closure of the MIRA plant in Hartford, one of Connecticut’s largest waste-to-energy incinerators, as evidence that the state is increasingly taking cleaning up its air problems seriously. and waste. Still, she said the plant’s closure will force officials to make new decisions about where to send the waste, as well as where to place new polluting factories in years to come.

Here are some of the policies related to climate change, recycling and other environmental issues that lawmakers say could become law this year:

Emission reductions

With talks about joining a regional climate initiative shelved for the time being, leaders of the General Assembly’s environment committee said they would instead focus on cutting carbon emissions through new technologies. new regulations imposed on vehicles purchased or registered within Connecticut’s borders.

On Thursday, Lamont proposed legislation to adopt California’s emission standards on medium- and heavy-duty vehicles — essentially vehicles that range in weight from a typical delivery truck to an 18-wheeler. Under the Clean Air Act, states can either adhere to federal standards or stricter rules set by California to regulate vehicle emissions.

Connecticut already requires emissions testing for light trucks such as domestic pickup trucks, however, vehicles weighing more than 10,000 pounds are exempt from testing.

California passed the tougher emissions standards for trucks in 2020, requiring manufacturers and dealers to start selling zero-emission trucks in 2024 and gradually increase quotas for zero-emission sales through 2035.

That effort overcame opposition from the trucking and oil industries, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Both industries were the main opponents of the TCI initiative, which they successfully described as a gas tax at a time when inflation was already raising prices at the pump.

In addition to focusing on truck emissions, Democratic lawmakers have also proposed changes to the state’s Clean Air Act to encourage sales of more electric vehicles, while Lamont’s administration seeks to phase out emissions. greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by mid-century, at an estimated cost of $5.5 billion.

Environment Committee Co-Chair Sen. Christine Cohen, D-Guilford, said last week she was confident lawmakers could get enough support to pass a combination of these proposals and “address a lot of the things that could have been addressed in the ICT if that had been the case”. crossed the finish line. »

Extended Producer Responsibility

While any effort to reduce emissions by regulating gas-guzzling vehicles and power plants is likely to spark a partisan showdown, both sides have expressed an interest in cleaning up Connecticut’s environment through rules known as accountability. extension of producers.

The concept essentially requires that the manufacturers or distributors – the producers – of certain hard-to-dispose products like mattresses or tires take greater responsibility for their discarded products, so that they do not end up clogging landfills and recycling centers that are not equipped to handle them.

Connecticut already has five EPR programs for mattresses, mercury thermometers, architectural paint, home electronics and rechargeable batteries. The programs are widely popular with local authorities because they remove some of the burden caused by illegal dumping on public lands and in municipal landfills.

For example, a bill that would have created EPR programs for tires, propane cylinders and smoke detectors last year received support from more than a dozen towns along the river valley. Lower Connecticut, after area leaders complained about the spillage of products along the river.

The Environment Committee’s other co-chair, state Rep. Joe Gresko, D-Stratford, said the legislation, which he sponsored, did not garner enough support to overcome opposition from the tire industry.

However, he said there was less opposition to an EPR program for propane cylinders and that he would likely introduce two separate bills this year to cover tires and propane tanks, hoping that one of them would be adopted.

“The industry needs to step up, and we hope to adopt something that will be accepted by the industry and that will be suitable for customers,” Gresko said.

bear hunting

Legalizing bear hunting has been an idea that has been swirling around Hartford for years, only to fail in the face of opposition from animal rights groups.

However, encounters with black bears continued to make headlines in nearly every corner of the state last year – even prompting state wildlife officials to urge residents to take their bird feeders – so it is possible that calls for a hunting season will resurface this session.

A leading supporter of a Connecticut bear hunt, state Sen. Craig Miner, R-Litchfield, did not return calls seeking comment on the matter. Miner is one of the GOP’s ranking members on the environment committee.

The state’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection has remained open to the idea of ​​allowing hunting as a way to cull Connecticut’s growing black bear population, resulting in more encounters with humans.

“DEEP is interested in the full range of options available to help cope with a growing bear population and bear habituation,” agency spokesman Will Healey said in a statement. communicated. “Hunting is a possible tool in the toolbox. Another is to increase our educational efforts to help residents get used to living with bears.

DEEP estimates there are about 1,200 black bears living in Connecticut, Healey said.

Among Connecticut’s neighbors in New York and all New England states except Rhode Island, there is a bear hunting season, which usually takes place in the fall. New Jersey previously allowed bear hunts. However, Governor Phil Murphy has suspended hunts beginning in 2020.

Ban on single-use plastics

Environment committee leaders said they also hope to resurrect last year’s legislation that would have phased out single-use plastic straws and styrofoam containers from restaurants by 2023.

The bill also would have required school districts to phase out the use of foam lunch trays.

The legislation passed the Environment Committee in a 2021 party vote, but failed to gain traction in the House or Senate after facing opposition from Republicans and the restaurant industry, who argued that the proposed ban would come at the wrong time. for restaurants already reeling from the pandemic.

To allay those concerns, Gresko said he and other supporters of the legislation would likely give the restaurant industry more time to phase out the use of single-use plastics and styrofoam containers.

“We were in the middle of a pandemic and the restaurant industry was suffering as it is,” Gresko said. “If we push back the date [of the ban] far enough away for them to use the products they have, allowing them to explore other options.

On Friday, Scott Dolch, president of the Connecticut Restaurant Association, could not be reached for comment.

It was also estimated that the legislation would cost school districts across the state between $2 million and $2.8 million to phase out the use of single-use polystyrene lunch trays.

Environmental Justice

One of the legislature’s leading supporters of Connecticut’s decades-old environmental justice laws, state Rep. Geraldo Reyes, D-Waterbury, said he would seek further improvements to the law after passing legislation in 2020 that forces low-income communities to have more of a say in the placement of polluting industries like power plants and landfills

The DEEP policy dating back to 1993 has been to prevent any community from having to “bear a disproportionate share of the risks and consequences of environmental pollution”.

Reyes, however, faulted the agency for failing to prevent the expansion of a refuse transfer station in the South Waterbury borough in 2018, despite the “noise, rubbish and dirt that was already in decline in this area.

“The Environmental Justice Act failed us in Waterbury when we went to use it,” Reyes said.

Reyes said he has since offered each session updates to the state’s environmental justice laws, with varying success.

“Every year I invest, sometimes it goes and sometimes it doesn’t,” Reyes said. “I will always continue to plead until I believe the State of Connecticut is doing it right.”

This year, Reyes said his efforts will focus on giving DEEP “more teeth” to impose fines and corrective action on polluters who violate the Environmental Justice Act.

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect Governor Phil Murphy suspending New Jersey’s bear hunting season beginning in 2020.

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Environmental issues drive St. Joseph’s takeover https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-drive-st-josephs-takeover/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-drive-st-josephs-takeover/ ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered a receiver to take over facilities owned by a pesticide manufacturing company in St. Joseph that has been accused for years of failing to comply with environmental laws regarding hazardous waste. The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that a receiver was appointed last month for […]]]>

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered a receiver to take over facilities owned by a pesticide manufacturing company in St. Joseph that has been accused for years of failing to comply with environmental laws regarding hazardous waste.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that a receiver was appointed last month for facilities owned by HPI Products Inc., St. Joe Properties LLC and William Garvey.

A woman who answered the phone to HPI on Tuesday said no one was available for comment.

The defendants operate six facilities in Saint-Joseph that manufacture, store and distribute pesticides. Since at least 2007, thousands of containers of hazardous and non-hazardous chemicals have been stored at the sites, some of which are dilapidated, according to the EPA.

The federal government and Missouri state government have filed a lawsuit against the companies and Garvey since 2008, alleging multiple violations of environmental laws. They also allege that the companies failed to comply with the terms of a 2011 regulation requiring them to clean their facilities.

The judge’s order grants a June 2021 motion that temporarily freezes the defendants’ assets and allows the receiver to take control of the buildings, assets and limited operations for 60 days.

The receiver will determine whether the defendants have the assets to comply with the 2011 settlement.

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Environmental concerns lead to takeover of St. Joseph company | Missouri News https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-concerns-lead-to-takeover-of-st-joseph-company-missouri-news/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-concerns-lead-to-takeover-of-st-joseph-company-missouri-news/ ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered a receiver to take over facilities owned by a pesticide manufacturing company in St. Joseph that has been accused for years of failing to comply with environmental laws regarding hazardous waste. The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that a receiver was appointed last month for […]]]>

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge has ordered a receiver to take over facilities owned by a pesticide manufacturing company in St. Joseph that has been accused for years of failing to comply with environmental laws regarding hazardous waste.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday that a receiver was appointed last month for facilities owned by HPI Products Inc., St. Joe Properties LLC and William Garvey.

A woman who answered the phone to HPI on Tuesday said no one was available for comment.

The defendants operate six facilities in Saint-Joseph that manufacture, store and distribute pesticides. Since at least 2007, thousands of containers of hazardous and non-hazardous chemicals have been stored at the sites, some of which are dilapidated, according to the EPA.

The federal government and Missouri state government have filed a lawsuit against the companies and Garvey since 2008, alleging multiple violations of environmental laws. They also allege that the companies failed to comply with the terms of a 2011 regulation requiring them to clean their facilities.

political cartoons

The judge’s order grants a June 2021 motion that temporarily freezes the defendants’ assets and allows the receiver to take control of the buildings, assets and limited operations for 60 days.

The receiver will determine whether the defendants have the assets to comply with the 2011 settlement.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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A former environmental science student works to restore groundwater quality https://eco-label-tourism.com/a-former-environmental-science-student-works-to-restore-groundwater-quality/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 18:40:29 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/a-former-environmental-science-student-works-to-restore-groundwater-quality/ At Taylor, students passionate about caring for God’s creation and being good stewards of the earth can pursue a Environmental Sciences Major. This program integrates biology, chemistry, and geology, with environmental law, policy, economics, and ethics for an interdisciplinary understanding of the earth, stewardship, and sustainability. After graduating in 2020, Benj Morris decided to pursue […]]]>

At Taylor, students passionate about caring for God’s creation and being good stewards of the earth can pursue a Environmental Sciences Major. This program integrates biology, chemistry, and geology, with environmental law, policy, economics, and ethics for an interdisciplinary understanding of the earth, stewardship, and sustainability.

After graduating in 2020, Benj Morris decided to pursue his passion for creation by taking care of drinking water in Ohio.

Delight in God’s creation and creativity

Morris loves everything about being outdoors, even the feel of the earth beneath his feet, which is why he doesn’t wear shoes, not even when riding his bike. “One of the reasons I still love being outdoors is because I grew up a Christian, so I always knew (it was) really cool to hang out like God gave us gifts,” he said. “God didn’t need to make it beautiful, we don’t need to have the Grand Canyon; it’s not necessary. But He chose to do it. I always thought it was really cool that he chose to make nature really complex and interconnected.

Morris knew he wanted to major in environmental science at Taylor, but he also had a creative gift for music, so he pursued a major in both. However, he ultimately had to choose one or the other and found his answer with his classes and environmental science teachers.

“I was taking geology classes in the spring with Dr. Guebert, and I fell in love with him,” Morris said. With Environmental Science, Morris was thrilled to learn more about God and his art through his creation. Morris also became president of the Stewards of Creation Club, served as a sustainability assistant at campus apartments, and worked as a geology teaching assistant for Dr. Guebert.

Morris was still able to develop his musical skills and share his passion with others in the Taylor Chorale and by becoming the part-time worship director at Mercy Baptist Church in Marion. Music allowed Morris to connect with a church and the local community.

“There are people in the real world who want to invest in you, to see you grow and push you,” Morris said. “The pastor and I met every two weeks. He would come to campus or I would go to his house, and we would meet and have lunch or coffee, and he would just disciple me. We were going through the scriptures, and he asked me questions and I asked him questions, and he held me responsible for certain things. It made me grow a lot.

Educating Business Owners on Contamination Prevention

Morris graduated at the height of Covid-19 restrictions, which made it difficult to get a job straight out of college. Through a connection he made through Professors Taylor Jan and Rob Reber, his instructors in his summer field course in the Black Hills, hWe were hired for an internship in South Dakota at a hatchery.

Morris working on his internship at the South Dakota Hatchery

However, after the restrictions started to be lifted, he quickly applied for government jobs, which is how he landed in Ohio as an Environmental Specialist II for the Environmental Protection Agency. the Ohio environment. He now specializes in groundwater remediation.

Currently, most of Morris’ work is done from home due to Covid-19 regulations, but he remains busy keeping businesses up to date with the code, checking for contamination leaks and cleaning up pollution spills. Surprisingly, most leaks come from small businesses that simply don’t know the proper procedures, so education is a big part of their job.

One of the serious situations Morris faced involved a laundromat that spilled chemicals into a storm sewer, instead of a drain that went to a water treatment plant. The chemicals went straight into a nearby ditch, which polluted the town’s water supply for two years.

In order to reverse polluted water, appropriate chemicals must be added to treat or neutralize the pollutant, but cleaning up groundwater can take years, which is why avoiding contamination is always the best course of action. simple.

Vocational and professional training in every class

As an environmental scientist, Morris has gained hands-on experience through labs each semester of his academic career, which has helped prepare him for the job he is in now.

“The Department of Environmental Science is so good at making sure you don’t just learn information,” Morris said, “Every class I took was specifically geared towards a function of a possible profession. we could have – every class was professional training. My whole degree was all about group projects and presentations, and that’s what all this work is about.”

Before going to Taylor, Morris knew he wanted a small school where he could get to know the teachers personally, so he put Taylor at the top of his list.

“Teachers aren’t just there to teach you, they want to see you succeed in your career, your life, and your faith. They are there to push you. So really, the best advice I would have for anyone considering studying environmental science at Taylor is to befriend these professors, because they are awesome.

Trust in God’s plan

Morris’ education, experiences and professional development at Taylor led him down a meandering path to what he now considers his dream job, and while he encountered challenges, he never nothing changed.

“Everything that’s happened in my life has brought me to where I am now,” Morris said.

If you want to learn more about the Environmental Science major and the hands-on training it offers, click here!

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EPA Deputy Director obtains Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University – FrontPageAfrica https://eco-label-tourism.com/epa-deputy-director-obtains-masters-in-environmental-science-from-clark-university-frontpageafrica/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 10:07:04 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/epa-deputy-director-obtains-masters-in-environmental-science-from-clark-university-frontpageafrica/ MONROVIA – Mr. Randall Dobayou, Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) obtained a Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University of International Development, Community and Environment. This comes after an intense period of study and research in Worchester, Massachusetts. “I graduated with a Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy with an […]]]>

MONROVIA – Mr. Randall Dobayou, Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) obtained a Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University of International Development, Community and Environment.

This comes after an intense period of study and research in Worchester, Massachusetts.

“I graduated with a Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy with an absolute focus on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation,” Dobayou told FrontPageAfrica.

According to Dobayou, his journey at Clark was a knowledge expansion effort aimed at improving his knowledge of the environment and climate change-related activities.

“This nourishing journey began in the fall of 2020. Despite the challenges of work and school, I graduated with a GPA of 3.47. I have mastered the convolution of environmental science and decoded the intrinsic complexity of global climate change scenarios while understanding the meeting point where policy makers meet scientists in the real world, ”he said .

The young environmentalist expressed his gratitude to President George Weah and the government of Liberia for giving him the opportunity to continue his education at Clark University, where he discovered the social cost of carbon, solar climate engineering / la modification of solar radiation, circular economy, rationalism and the merit of investment in renewable energy sources.

“Her support has given me more methods and skills to solve the complexity of problems as the world tackles the booming impacts of climate change, environmental degradation, pollution and environmental injustice. “said Dobayou.

He also expressed his gratitude to Minister of Finance Samuel D. Tweah Jr, Minister of State Nathaniel F. McGill. “A huge thank you and appreciation to President Jefferson T. Koijee for his selfless support and leadership to many other young people and myself. Thanks to Professor Tarpeh and the EPA family, your support is greatly appreciated. Special thanks to Mother Piso Saydee — Tarr, President Mulbah K Morlu Jr and Dr Samora PZ Wolokolie.
Thank you for your support, motivation and courage to my father, mother, siblings and friends. Thank you Liberia, I promised to continue to serve you well ”, h

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Liberia: Deputy Director of EPA Earns MSc in Environmental Science from Clark University https://eco-label-tourism.com/liberia-deputy-director-of-epa-earns-msc-in-environmental-science-from-clark-university/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/liberia-deputy-director-of-epa-earns-msc-in-environmental-science-from-clark-university/ Monrovia — Mr. Randall Dobayou, Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) graduated with a Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University of International Development, Community and Environment. It comes after an intense period of study and research in Worchester, Massachusetts. “I graduated with a Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy with […]]]>

Monrovia — Mr. Randall Dobayou, Deputy Director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) graduated with a Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University of International Development, Community and Environment.

It comes after an intense period of study and research in Worchester, Massachusetts.

“I graduated with a Master of Science in Environmental Science and Policy with an absolute focus on climate change impacts and adaptation,” Dobayou told FrontPageAfrica.

According to Dobayou, his journey at Clark was an attempt at knowledge expansion intended to improve his knowledge of the environment and activities related to climate change.

“This nurturing journey began in the fall of 2020. Despite the challenges of work and school, I graduated with a 3.47 GPA. I mastered the convolution of environmental science and decoded the intrinsic complexity of global climate change scenarios while understanding the meeting point where policy makers meet scientists in the real world,” he said.

The young environmentalist expressed his gratitude to President George Weah and the government of Liberia for giving him the opportunity to continue his education at Clark University where he learned about the social cost of carbon, solar climate engineering/ modification of solar radiation, circular economy, rationalism administration and the merit of investing in renewable energy sources.

“His support has given me more methods and skills to solve the complexity of problems as the world struggles with the thundering impacts of climate change, environmental degradation, pollution and environmental injustice. “, said Dobayou.

He also thanked Finance Minister Samuel D. Tweah Jr, Minister of State Nathaniel F. McGill. “Many thanks and appreciation to President Jefferson T. Koijee for his selfless support and leadership to many other young people and me. Thanks to Professor Tarpeh and the EPA family, your support is much appreciated. Special thanks to Mother Piso Saydee–Tarr, President Mulbah K Morlu Jr and Dr. Samora PZ Wolokolie.

Thank you for your support, your motivation and your courage to my father, my mother, my brothers and sisters and my friends. Thank you Liberia, I have promised to continue to serve you well”, h

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Environmental issues and sustainable practices among the government’s main objectives https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-and-sustainable-practices-among-the-governments-main-objectives/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 14:35:09 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/environmental-issues-and-sustainable-practices-among-the-governments-main-objectives/ Environmental issues and the promotion of sustainable practices are among the main objectives of the government and of the European family at large, as predictions regarding the repercussions of global climate change and the need for immediate and effective action are recognized by all, Cypriot government spokesperson, Marios Pelekanos said on Friday. Addressing an event […]]]>


Environmental issues and the promotion of sustainable practices are among the main objectives of the government and of the European family at large, as predictions regarding the repercussions of global climate change and the need for immediate and effective action are recognized by all, Cypriot government spokesperson, Marios Pelekanos said on Friday.

Addressing an event organized by the environmental organization “Green Shield” in Nicosia, Pelekanos said that the government’s determination to take all necessary measures to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement in order to deal with the repercussions of climate change was confirmed during the recent successful organization of the 2nd International Conference on Climate Change in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, held in Paphos.

He noted that everyone recognized that our region is particularly vulnerable to the repercussions of climate change and that is why the initiative of the Cypriot President, Nicos Anastasiades, to put in place a regional action plan to deal with these repercussions. in all areas, including the environment, agriculture, tourism and others, which have a serious impact on the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East, were considered particularly important.

Pelekanos noted that over the past two years, 13 groups have worked for this action plan with the participation of 240 scientists from the region and international organizations.

Regarding Cyprus, he said that measures are encouraged through the action plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to put in place mechanisms for more resilient and competitive economies thanks to the sources of renewable energy, to encourage businesses and industries to adapt to sustainable and green technologies and create jobs in green policy sectors.

The spokesperson noted that more than 500 million euros, or 41% of the budget of the recovery and resilience plan of Cyprus, for the years 2021-2026 relate to investments and reforms that contribute to the green transition.

In addition, he said the government has adopted a national strategy to adapt to climate change so that Cyprus becomes more resilient, developing initiatives in the fields of agriculture, tourism, water resources, sea, biodiversity, forests, fisheries, health and energy. .

During the event, prizes were awarded to schools for their environmental activities. The President of the Chamber, Annita Demetriou, and the Deputy Minister of Research and Innovation, Kyriakos Kokkinos were also present, among others.

Addressing the event, Demetriou stressed the need for cooperation in order to implement all necessary measures for the environment.

She noted that it is recognized at both state and EU level that environmental protection is a fundamental human right and must be addressed as such, especially after the devastating fires in summer.


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Mayor of Limassol highlights environmental issues affecting city, KNEWS https://eco-label-tourism.com/mayor-of-limassol-highlights-environmental-issues-affecting-city-knews/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 09:28:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/mayor-of-limassol-highlights-environmental-issues-affecting-city-knews/ A research study on the environmental risks and economic benefits of the sector’s activities in Limassol demonstrates the urgent need to protect the city’s coastal, marine and maritime environment. The study “Blue Limassol: Environmental Risk Assessment” for the identification and comprehensive assessment of activities that threaten the coastal and marine environment of Limassol is coordinated […]]]>


A research study on the environmental risks and economic benefits of the sector’s activities in Limassol demonstrates the urgent need to protect the city’s coastal, marine and maritime environment.

The study “Blue Limassol: Environmental Risk Assessment” for the identification and comprehensive assessment of activities that threaten the coastal and marine environment of Limassol is coordinated by Frederick University and the Municipality of Limassol and its preliminary results have been presented during a round table organized at the initiative of the leader of the Democratic Rally (DISY), Mr. Averof Neophytou.

The Mayor of Limassol, the research team and representatives of stakeholders and organizations attended the discussion which took place in Limassol on December 6, 2021.

Thanking the participants, Mr. Neophytou stressed that “the broader issue of environmental protection must be at the center of political and social agendas”. Referring to the development of Limassol and its positive results for the local and national economy, the leader of DISY recognized the need to take measures for the protection of the environment.

The initiative for the study lies with the Mayor of Limassol, Mr. Nicos Nicolaides, who, in his welcome address, stressed the importance of the study as a documented scientific basis in the effort to ensure the development sustainable city. The mayor thanked Frederick University for its long-term collaboration, which began by co-hosting the Blue Limassol Forum in 2020.

As part of the Blue Limassol Forum, 500 Limassol citizens had the opportunity to share their thoughts on a number of environmental issues. “The ‘Limassol Blue: Environmental Risk Assessment’ study provides answers to the concerns of citizens,” said Mr Nicolaides.

Dr Angelos Menelaou, project leader of the Blue Limassol study and head of the Department of Marine and Trade at Frederick University, stressed that the study more reflects global concerns directly related to the strategic development goals of the ‘EU and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

More than 25 scientists from Cyprus and abroad worked on the scientific literature for the study, which is the first to examine all development and operational activities in key sectors of the economy that may pose risks to the coastal, marine and maritime environment of Limassol. . In particular, risks arising from the operation of ports and ships, oil and gas, marinas and yachts, water sports, fish farming and fishing, construction and hotels and water systems. sewerage and municipal waste management.

The study further suggests the implementation of best practices to reduce the risks that threaten the city’s environment, with the ultimate aim of preserving the attractiveness and sustainability of the great coastal front of Limassol. “We are optimistic that Limassol can have a sustainable future thanks to the willingness of more than 100 relevant bodies and relevant organizations to cooperate with us in the preparation of our study, their sincere concern and their intention to act now”, commented Dr Menelaou who thanked the research team that worked on the study: his academic colleagues and researchers from Frederick University, DNV Hellas, the Marine and Environmental Research Laboratory (MER), the Marine Institute and Maritime Cyprus (CMMI) and the Limassol District Development Company (ANELEM). He also thanked the Ministry of Energy, Trade and Industry, the Deputy Ministry of Maritime Transport, the companies Ernst & Young and Total Energies for their support to the project.

The final results of the study will be presented next February at the 2nd Blue Limassol Forum co-organized by the Municipality of Limassol and the Department of Marine and Trade of Frederick University as part of their strategic collaboration.


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Penn State Extension Relaunches Leadership on Environmental Issues | Way of life https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-relaunches-leadership-on-environmental-issues-way-of-life/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://eco-label-tourism.com/penn-state-extension-relaunches-leadership-on-environmental-issues-way-of-life/ UNIVERSITY PARK – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can people encourage volunteers to take action on climate change? These questions seized a team of Penn State Extension educators and master gardeners, who set out to find answers. They started out by securing a Science to Practice Extension grant from the […]]]>


UNIVERSITY PARK – What keeps people from leading and implementing local projects? How can people encourage volunteers to take action on climate change? These questions seized a team of Penn State Extension educators and master gardeners, who set out to find answers.

They started out by securing a Science to Practice Extension grant from the College of Agricultural Sciences office for research and higher education. These grants provide up to $ 10,000 per year to integrated research and extension teams to address pressing and complex challenges.

“Our premise was that people don’t run projects because they don’t feel like they have leadership skills and they don’t know how to get the money,” said Linda Falcone, a Entrepreneurship, economic and community development educator based in Wyoming County.

To test this theory, Suzanna Windon, an assistant professor of youth and adult leadership at the college, interviewed more than a thousand master gardeners and master watershed stewards about their volunteering habits. The survey found that the volunteers did indeed perceive weaknesses in educating others, writing grants, raising funds for projects and communicating with local government. These results guided the training topics for a pilot leadership program.

Twenty-six volunteers from four counties signed up for the pilot project. Led by educators from Extension’s Leadership and Community Vitality team, participants learned about leadership styles, team development, working with local leaders and dealing with conflict. What touched participants the most was the grant writing course, where they learned how to measure impact and how to prepare a proposal.

Participants then worked in county-based teams to draft grant proposals for local projects dealing with environmental issues. They described their projects, explained the potential impacts of the project and prepared a budget. After evaluating and comparing the proposals, extension educators allocated Science-to-Practice grant funds to each team.

“This is what makes this program unique,” ​​Falcone said. “It took the risk of writing a grant and not being funded, because we already did it for them [with the Science-to-Practice grant]. “

{span style = “font-size: 12px;”} Fostering independence was a primary goal, explained Falcone. The skills acquired through the leadership program will enable participants to raise funds and initiate community projects on their own. {/ span}

The county-based teams partnered with local leaders to bring their projects to fruition. A team cleaned up an overgrown garden in a state park and planted pollinator-friendly plants to rejuvenate the garden. Another team created a rain garden around a pavilion in a new waterfront municipal park. The rain garden captures the overflow water that rushes down the hills – with the aim of reducing water pollution in the Susquehanna River.

A third team conducted soil health testing experiments and offered training and soil testing kits to community members. Introducing home gardeners to these techniques could increase the nutrient level in their soil and reduce the use of synthetic fertilizers.

The fourth team partnered with a group of community volunteers to educate residents about native plants and distribute plants to low-income homeowners.

Teaching others about environmental issues was crucial, according to Falcone. “The purpose of Master Gardeners is to educate others about why the environment is so important and how they can help,” she said.

Additionally, county-based teams gathered letters of recognition from the community and created impact statements to use for future education and publicity.

In a survey that followed the program, more than half of participants said they were more likely to lead a community project in the future, and 86 percent said it improved their leadership skills.

Melissa Wright participated in the Soil Health Project in Wyoming County. She found the hands-on learning activities interesting and informative. As the Master Gardeners coordinator, Wright observed that the Master Gardeners volunteers undergo basic training with a lot of knowledge to share. This course helped translate this knowledge into community awareness.

Efforts are underway to expand the program statewide. A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will fund a pilot youth program in 2022. Aimed at youth ages 13 to 18, the program will take place in five locations and consist of two Master Watershed Steward projects and three Master Gardener projects.

“We need the next generation to not only be aware of environmental issues, but also to take action to address them,” Falcone said.


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